Luke Runyon http://kvnf.org en Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules http://kvnf.org/post/marijuana-laced-treats-leave-colorado-jonesing-food-safety-rules Where there's pot, there's pot brownies. But how do you make sure those high-inducing sweets are safe to eat?<p>Colorado regulators are wrestling with that question now that the state has legalized recreational marijuana. From sodas and truffles to granola bars and butter, food products infused with THC – the chemical in marijuana that gives you a high — are already for sale.<p>The problem? Marijuana is still illegal under federal law. Sun, 02 Feb 2014 21:10:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 21712 at http://kvnf.org Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules Colorado Imposes Food Safety Rules On Marijuana Industry http://kvnf.org/post/colorado-imposes-food-safety-rules-marijuana-industry <p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18px;">Colorado made history when it opened up&nbsp;</span><a href="http://kunc.org/post/colorados-mountain-resorts-gear-recreational-marijuana" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(0, 82, 155); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 18px;">licensed marijuana retail shops this year</a><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18px;">. Fri, 24 Jan 2014 15:24:24 +0000 Luke Runyon 21335 at http://kvnf.org Colorado Imposes Food Safety Rules On Marijuana Industry Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms http://kvnf.org/post/forget-golf-courses-subdivisions-draw-residents-farms When you picture a housing development in the suburbs, you might imagine golf courses, swimming pools, rows of identical houses.<p>But now, there's a new model springing up across the country that taps into the local food movement: Farms — complete with livestock, vegetables and fruit trees — are serving as the latest suburban amenity.<p>It's called development-supported agriculture, a more intimate version of community-supported agriculture — a farm-share program commonly known as CSA. Tue, 17 Dec 2013 08:15:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 19922 at http://kvnf.org Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms Forget The Golf Course, Developers Use Farming To Sell Suburban Homes http://kvnf.org/post/forget-golf-course-developers-use-farming-sell-suburban-homes <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">For decades, housing developments in the suburbs have come complete with golf courses, tennis courts, strip malls and swimming pools. But make way for the new subdivision amenity: the specialty farm.</span></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">A new model for suburban development is springing up across the country that taps into the local food movement. Farms, complete with livestock, vegetables and fruit trees, are serving as a way to entice potential buyers to settle in a new subdivision.</span></p><p></p> Thu, 12 Dec 2013 17:38:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 19748 at http://kvnf.org Forget The Golf Course, Developers Use Farming To Sell Suburban Homes Proposed Merger would create Flour Milling Goliath http://kvnf.org/post/proposed-merger-would-create-flour-milling-goliath <p style="margin-bottom: 12px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; font-family: 'PT Sans', sans-serif; line-height: 15px;">Fall is planting time for wheat across the Great Plains and this year’s crop went into the ground while big changes were underway in the wheat market. Some of the biggest players in the flour milling industry are joining forces to make the country’s largest miller even larger.</p> Wed, 27 Nov 2013 03:48:23 +0000 Luke Runyon 19105 at http://kvnf.org Proposed Merger would create Flour Milling Goliath Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out http://kvnf.org/post/ranchers-worry-demand-sheep-declines Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in the U.S. has plummeted by half. The sheep industry has actually been declining since the late 1940s, when it hit its peak.<p>The sharp drop in production has left ranchers to wonder, "When are we going to hit the bottom?"<p>Some sheep are raised for their wool, others primarily for food. Consumption of both products — lamb meat and wool — have been declining in the U.S.<p>If you look at the tags on clothes in your closet, chances are quite a few pieces will be blended with synthetic fibers: nylon, rayon and polyester. Mon, 21 Oct 2013 09:03:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 17492 at http://kvnf.org Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out Edible Forests: The Next Step in the Local Food Movement? http://kvnf.org/post/edible-forests-next-step-local-food-movement <p style="margin-bottom: 12px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; font-family: 'PT Sans', sans-serif; line-height: 15px;">Community gardens dole out small plots of land and encourage people with limited access to fresh produce to grow their own. Now, there&rsquo;s a new twist on that model springing up across the country: edible food forests.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 12px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; font-family: 'PT Sans', sans-serif; line-height: 15px;">&nbsp;</p> Thu, 17 Oct 2013 16:23:08 +0000 Luke Runyon 17359 at http://kvnf.org Edible Forests: The Next Step in the Local Food Movement? The Long, Slow Decline of the U.S. Sheep Industry http://kvnf.org/post/long-slow-decline-us-sheep-industry <p>Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in this country has been cut in half. In fact, the number has been declining since the late 1940s, when the American sheep industry hit its peak. Today, the domestic sheep herd is one-tenth the size it was during World War II.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The decline is the result of economic and cultural factors coming together. And it has left ranchers to wonder, &ldquo;When are we going to hit the bottom?&rdquo;</span></p><p></p> Tue, 15 Oct 2013 16:11:38 +0000 Luke Runyon 17251 at http://kvnf.org The Long, Slow Decline of the U.S. Sheep Industry Can Millet Take On Quinoa? First, It'll Need A Makeover http://kvnf.org/post/can-millet-take-quinoa-first-itll-need-makeover Walk through a health food store and you'll find amaranth, sorghum, quinoa — heritage grains that have been staples around the world for generations. Americans are just discovering them.<p>There's another age-old grain that grows right here on the Great Plains: millet.<p>The millet plant is drought-tolerant, and nutritionally it competes with quinoa, the protein-rich South American grain that American farmers <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/11/29/166155875/quinoa-craze-inspires-north-america-to-start-growing-its-own">are clamoring</a> to grow. Wed, 02 Oct 2013 07:23:00 +0000 Luke Runyon 16698 at http://kvnf.org Can Millet Take On Quinoa? First, It'll Need A Makeover Prison Dairy Serves Up Buffalo Milk http://kvnf.org/post/prison-dairy-serves-buffalo-milk <p>Past the razor-wire fences, beyond huge metal gates, behind thick walls, you’ll find one of the most unique dairies in the country.&nbsp;</p><p> Wed, 04 Sep 2013 17:06:28 +0000 Luke Runyon 15476 at http://kvnf.org Prison Dairy Serves Up Buffalo Milk