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Politics
4:14 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Donald Trump Explores Border Reform Measures In South Texas

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Health
4:14 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

What If Chemo Doesn't Help You Live Longer Or Better?

For best quality of life, many cancer patients who can't be cured might do best to forgo chemo and focus instead on pain relief and easing sleep and mood problems, a survey of caregivers suggests.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 9:10 am

Chemotherapy given to patients at the end of life often does more harm than good, according to a study that calls into question this common practice.

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Goats and Soda
3:21 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Obama Thinks Solar Power Will Boost Kenya; Kenyans Aren't So Sure

Kenyan graffiti artist Bankslave created a mural of Barack Obama. The president himself will visit Kenya on Friday. One of the president's agenda items is to promote solar power.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 9:15 am

When Jackline Mumbua decided to go solar, she knew the cost would be steep. The 35-year-old housewife in Machakos, Kenya, can barely cover the expenses of raising three school-age children on the little money her husband earns driving a motorcycle taxi. They have no savings. It took her family nearly two years to pay, in monthly installments, the $55 for a small rooftop solar panel.

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Army Warns Of 'Armed Citizens' Trying To Protect Recruiting Stations

Members of the FBI Evidence Response Team investigate the shooting at the Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard Recruitment Office on July 17 in Chattanooga, Tenn. Since the shooting, armed civilians have begun trying to guard such centers.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 4:51 pm

The Army is not happy about armed civilians who have been appearing at recruiting stations in several states in the wake of the Chattanooga shootings, ostensibly to help guard against such attacks.

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Around the Nation
3:07 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

In Hot Pursuit Of Public Safety, Police Consider Fewer Car Chases

Pursuit chases have led to crashes, like this one in Leawood, Kan., in 2004, at least 706 times in the last 10 years.
Photo courtesy of credit Leawood Police Department/Courtesy of KCPT

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:39 am

Police officers have to make complicated, split-second decisions every day — and whether or not to chase a fleeing suspect is no exception. And they often have to make this decision while driving a car at very high speeds.

Kansas City area police chief Steve Beamer says they don't make it lightly. "We have to continually balance the need to apprehend that individual who chooses to flee against the safety of the public that may be at risk because of the pursuit," Beamer says.

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Africa
2:58 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Nigerian President: U.S. Refusal To Provide Weapons Aides Extremism

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 5:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:58 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Chattanooga, Tenn., Church Bells Ring Out In Honor Of Killed Service Members

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 4:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today in Chattanooga, Tenn., a somber moment.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHURCH BELL RINGING)

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Late this afternoon, several churches and chapels rang their bells.

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Sports
2:58 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

British Cyclist Chris Froome Leads As Tour De France Enters Final Days

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 4:14 pm

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Diabetes

A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 4:59 pm

It's true that being overweight or obese is a leading risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes.

But attention, skinny and normal-weight people: You may be vulnerable, too.

Lots of lifestyle choices influence the risk of diabetes: everything from whether you smoke to how much you exercise (or don't). It turns out, what you choose to drink is also a risk factor.

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Goats and Soda
2:51 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

An 80-Year-Old Looks Into The Eyes Of Her Teenage Self

The hand-colored photo, titled "Reclining young lady," is of Stella Osarhiere Gbinigie when she was 16.
Solomon Osagie Alonge Franko Khoury/National Museum of African Art

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:05 pm

She dressed up in her mother's lace blouse and wore her jewels. She and her two sisters were going to get her picture taken at a studio in Benin, Nigeria. She struck a pose. The year was 1950 and she was 16 years old.

Flash forward 65 years. Stella Osarhiere Gbinigie is in Washington, D.C., this month. She is now 80. And she comes face-to-face with her youthful portrait, hanging on the walls of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art. She had never seen the original hand-colored portrait until just this past Tuesday.

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It's All Politics
1:54 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Obama's First Trip To Kenya As President Is Less About His Roots This Time

A man in Nairobi, Kenya, stands in front of a mural of President Obama, created by the Kenyan graffiti artist Bankslave, ahead of Obama's trip to Kenya and Ethiopia.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 3:19 pm

President Obama leaves Thursday night on a trip that will take him back to his father's homeland, while at the same time making him the first sitting president to visit two key East African nations: Kenya and Ethiopia.

The president's first stop is Kenya. He will not visit his father's ancestral village, administration officials say, citing security and logistical reasons. But he will meet privately with relatives, who may well include his father's second wife; Obama's step-grandmother, known as Mama Sarah; and his half-sister Auma Obama.

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Shots - Health News
1:38 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Why Disability And Poverty Still Go Hand In Hand 25 Years After Landmark Law

After a long day, Emeka arrives home to the apartment in South Tulsa that he shares with his father.
Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:23 am

If you have a disability in the U.S., you're twice as likely to be poor as someone without a disability. You're also far more likely to be unemployed. And that gap has widened in the 25 years since the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted.

"Every man, woman and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, independence and freedom," President George H.W. Bush said when he signed the bill into law on July 26, 1990.

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Shots - Health News
12:56 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Administration Prods States To Scrutinize Insurers' Rate Hikes

akindo iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:29 am

There's a battle brewing behind the scenes to keep health plans affordable for consumers. The Obama administration weighed in this week, sending letters to insurance regulators in every state and Washington, D.C., that ask them to take a closer look at rate requests before granting them.

Under the Affordable Care Act, state agencies largely retain the right to regulate premiums. So far only a handful have finalized premiums for the coming year, for which enrollment begins in November.

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It's All Politics
12:48 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

How Democratic-Leaning Detroit Helped Shape Ben Carson's Conservative Views

Ben Carson is the only African-American major candidate running for president in 2016. He grew up poor in Detroit in the 1960s and paved his own path.
Jonathan Bachman AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 1:39 pm

Long before Benjamin Carson was a Republican presidential candidate, he was a hero and a role model.

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It's All Politics
12:46 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Think America's Roads Are Crumbling? Not Quite

High-profile events like bridge collapses or road sinkholes (like this one in Maryland in 2010) could make you think America's roads are crumbling. That's not quite true.
Logan Mock-Bunting Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 9:22 am

Congress is one tiny step closer to funding America's highways, as the Senate decided Wednesday night to open debate on their transportation bill as the July 31 deadline looms. The Highway Trust Fund has been in dire straits the last few years, spending more than it's taking in. Because it gets its money from the federal gas tax, the trust fund has suffered as cars have grown more fuel-efficient and some Americans have cut back on their driving.

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Man On Train Misses His Stop, So He Pulls Emergency Release To Get Off

A man on this train pulled the emergency release, after realizing he had missed his stop.
WMATA

As a subway train left the L'Enfant Plaza station in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, a man on board realized he had just missed his stop.

Instead of doing what most of us would do — ride to the next stop and get on the next train going in the opposite direction — he decided to pull the emergency release.

Along with that version events, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority released a video that shows the man pry the doors open and then, with his child in tow, run away from the train.

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Kepler Telescope Introduces Earth To A Very Distant Cousin

Artist's concept compares Earth (left) to the new planet, called Kepler-452b, which is about 60 percent larger in diameter.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 2:24 pm

NASA's planet-hunting Kepler Telescope has spotted the first roughly Earth-sized world orbiting in the "Goldilocks zone" of another star – offering perhaps the best bet so far for life elsewhere in the universe.

A year on Kepler-452b, which is about 1,400 light years from us in the constellation Cygnus, is 385 days, meaning its orbit is just a bit farther away from its star than the Earth is from the sun. That places it squarely within what planetary scientists call the habitable zone, or "Goldilocks" zone — not too cold and not too hot.

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Shots - Health News
10:19 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Doctors Press For Action To Lower 'Unsustainable' Prices For Cancer Drugs

Skyrocketing costs for cancer drugs have triggered a backlash.
iStockphoto

Anyone who's fought cancer knows that it's not just scary, but pricey, too.

"A lot of my patients cry — they're frustrated," says Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, a hematologist at the Mayo Clinic. "Many of them spend their life savings on cancer drugs and end up being bankrupt."

The average U.S. family makes $52,000 annually. Cancer drugs can easily cost a $120,000 a year. Out-of-pocket expenses for the insured can run $25,000 to $30,000 — more than half of a typical family's income.

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The Two-Way
9:52 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Japan's Nikkei Will Purchase Financial Times Group For $1.3 Billion

Copies of the Financial Times newspaper are displayed for a photograph in London. British publisher Pearson is selling the paper to Japanese media company Nikkei.
Niklas Halle'n AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 12:07 pm

In a development that comes after a German firm was reportedly close to reaching a deal to buy the Financial Times Group from the Pearson publishing company, the Financial Times will instead be bought by Japanese media company Nikkei, for 844 million pounds ($1.3 billion) in cash.

Earlier Thursday, the Financial Times itself had reported that the newspaper's publisher was on the verge of being sold to German media group Alex Springer. Other reports had suggested that Bloomberg or Thomson Reuters were potential buyers.

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The Salt
9:33 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Donald Trump On A Circus Peanut, And More Food Art With A Political Bite

Trump for everything but wide
Courtesy of Lauren Garfinkel

A lot of people seem to want to bite Donald Trump's head off these days. For those riled up by the Republican presidential candidate's incendiary comments of late, artist Lauren Garfinkel offers up this food for thought:

Yep, that's the Donald's likeness carved into a circus peanut – those marshmallow candies shaped like the legume. The orange hue, Garfinkel says, reminded her of Trump's signature tan.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Kerry, Moniz Face Off With Skeptical Lawmakers Over Iran Deal

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 10:39 am

Secretary of State John Kerry and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz defended a deal reached with Iran over its nuclear program before skeptical lawmakers during a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Thursday.

Sen. Bob Corker, the committee chairman, opened the hearing by firing some shots.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Executions In Iran Undergo 'Unprecedented Spike,' Amnesty Says

People gather opposite Downing Street during a protest against the execution of a young woman in Iran, in October of last year. Amnesty International says that Iran has undergone an "unprecedented spike" in executions in recent months.
Graham Mitchell Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 11:57 am

Amnesty International has identified what it says is an "unprecedented spike" in executions in Iran in recent months, writing in a new report that at least 743 people may have been put to death in 2014 and nearly 700 more since the beginning of the year.

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The Two-Way
8:37 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Texas Fights Suit After Denying Birth Certificates To Children Of Illegal Immigrants

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, seen hear at his January swearing-in ceremony, has asked a federal judge to dismiss the lawsuit.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 10:38 am

An interesting immigration case is winding its way through a federal court in Austin, Texas: A group of mothers has filed suit against the chief of the state's Department of State Health Services Vital Statistics Unit, because it has refused to give their U.S.-born children birth certificates.

The issue here is not whether or not these children are U.S. citizens. They are and that's made plain by the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which says anyone born in the U.S. is automatically a citizen.

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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Greece Approves Reforms, Clearing Hurdle For Bailout Deal

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras listens to Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos as Justice Minister Nikos Paraskevopoulos looks on during a parliamentary session in Athens on Thursday.
Yiannakis Kourtoglou Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 12:50 pm

Greek lawmakers have approved a set of overhauls that were the last obstacles standing between Athens and a desperately needed 86 billion euro line of credit, which is being fronted by creditors along with a demand for domestic reforms.

The latest measures include a restructuring of the banking and judicial systems, passed easily (230-63 with five abstentions) despite thousands of anti-austerity protesters demonstrating loudly outside the Parliament building.

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Shots - Health News
6:51 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Medical Residents Are Indebted But Reasonably Happy

Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 2:43 pm

Medical residents are the tweeners of health care.

They've got their medical degrees but still haven't finished the training they need to go forth and practice their chosen specialties.

Talking to residents is one way to get a bead on where medicine may be headed. Medscape, an online news source for health professionals, just released a survey of more than 1,700 medical residents that asked a slew of questions about their hopes, everyday experience on the job and finances.

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Goats and Soda
6:50 am
Thu July 23, 2015

An Artificial Limb Can Bring Hope — But Who's Going To Make It?

Teacher Kim Song Bo lectures at a new school that is training students to make prosthetic limbs. Classes are held at the Center for the Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Amy Yee NPR

Sultan Mahmud's pink shorts revealed his new prosthetic leg made of plastic and metal. The boyish 20-year-old gripped a railing and stepped forward with feet in blue sneakers. The sweltering spring afternoon marked the first time Mahmud walked without crutches since his motorbike accident in 2013. His crushed left leg was amputated above the knee, and he remained bedridden in a hospital most of last year.

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The Two-Way
5:10 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Wildfires In Montana, California Scorch Thousands Of Acres, Trigger Evacuations

Smoke from the the Reynolds Creek wildfire rises above the landscape at St. Mary Lake in Glacier National Park, Mont.
Erin Conwell AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 7:43 am

Fast-moving wildfires in Montana and California have scorched thousands of acres and triggered evacuations.

NBC News has a bit more on the fire at Montana's Glacier National Park:

"The Reynolds Creek Wildland Fire was first reported about 6 p.m. ET on the east side of Glacier National Park, according to a news release by the National Parks Service.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Thu July 23, 2015

What The College Kids Are Reading

Lydia Thompson/NPR

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 10:20 am

I can remember the weeks before starting school at Skidmore College, furiously trying to finish Gregory Howard Williams' memoir, Life on the Color Line. The book had been assigned as our freshman reading assignment — part of the First-Year Experience at the liberal arts school in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

Four years later, Williams spoke at our graduation.

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Africa
4:24 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Kenyan Novelist Explains What President Obama's Visit Signifies

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 7:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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U.S.
4:24 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Investigators Seek The Gunman's Motivation In The Chattanooga Shooting

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 12:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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