KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio

Pages

Shots - Health News
2:27 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

A Surge In Painkiller Overdoses Among Women

Drugs found in the medicine chest are claiming more women's lives than cocaine and heroin.
Mark Gabrenya iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:52 am

Women are dying from overdoses of prescription painkillers at a much higher rate than men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And while men still suffer more overdoses, women are catching up fast.

From 1999 to 2010, the CDC found a fivefold increase in the number and rate of such cases among middle-aged women. Over the same period, the rate of overdoses from prescription painkillers increased 3.5 times in men.

Read more
Parallels
1:43 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The Hopeful Arab Spring Turns Into A Roiling Arab Summer

Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Wednesday. Shortly afterward, the military staged a coup, ousting Morsi and suspending the constitution.
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 2:42 pm

Two years ago, the Arab Spring was a fountain of hope. Autocratic leaders whose rule was measured in decades were suddenly ousted, raising the possibility of political, economic and social change in a region that was lagging.

But with a coup in Egypt on Wednesday and Syria's civil war raging, the widespread optimism in the spring of 2011 has turned into fears of chaos during the summer of 2013.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
1:31 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The Innovative Mosaic Of American Symphonies

Conductor JoAnn Falletta.
Cheryl Gorski courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:34 am

  • Hear JoAnn Falletta's Discussion With Robert Siegel

Our country's culture is a vast conglomeration of more than 200 years of influences from all over the world. We have taken what began as an extraordinary European tradition and expanded that legacy on American soil. We have added our essential egalitarianism, our love of experimentation, our inclusiveness and our boldness to the very form of the symphony. Americans have not been bound by one definition of the symphony, and composers have applied that formal name to pieces of varying length, structure and content.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:44 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Delay For Insurance Mandate Pleases Businesses

President Obama talked up the Affordable Care Act in San Jose, Calif., in June. Now, the administration has said a key provision affecting businesses won't take effect until 2015.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:07 pm

The Obama administration's decision late Tuesday to postpone the requirement for employers with 50 or more workers to offer health coverage or risk fines has satisfied some key members of the coalition that supported the law.

But the one-year reprieve also raises new questions about the administration's ability to get the huge health law up and running in an orderly fashion. The deadline for the new health exchanges to begin enrolling individuals is Oct. 1.

Read more
The Salt
12:18 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Outbreak Traced To Pomegranates Reveals Flaws In Global Food Chain

A fruit thought by some to be what Eve used to tempt Adam has been grown in the Middle East for centuries.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:10 pm

Disease detectives have traced the continuing outbreak of hepatitis A that has so far sickened 136 people in the U.S. to a shipment of pomegranate seeds from the Anatolian region of Turkey.

As a result, the Food and Drug Administration has ordered any new shipments from the company that shipped the suspect fruit, Goknur Foodstuffs Import Export Trading, to be seized at American ports.

Read more
It's All Politics
10:56 am
Wed July 3, 2013

6 Questions For The Man Who Tracks Texas Trends

Lloyd Potter, the state demographer of Texas
Office of the State Demographer

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 11:47 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Few know Texas' population as well as its official demographer, Lloyd Potter, a professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio. He talked with NPR this week about his research.

Read more
The Salt
10:47 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Civil War Soldiers Needed Bravery To Face The Foe, And The Food

How did the food taste? These faces say it all. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, Meade in Virginia, August-November 1863.
Timothy H. O'Sullivan Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 11:11 am

War is hell, Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman is famously said to have uttered.* And the food, he might as well have added, was pretty lousy, too.

As the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg — a turning point in the Civil War — it's worth remembering that the men who fought on that Pennsylvania field did so while surviving on food that would make most of us surrender in dismay.

Read more
Digital Life
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Martin Luther King's Memory Inspires Teenage Dream

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now we continue our special series remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech, which will be 50 years old this summer.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.: I have a dream...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 1: As a kindergarten teacher in a Texas public school, my dream is for our country to begin to value our youngest members of society.

Read more
Politics
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

The Politics Of Abortion In Texas

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now, this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to go back to law and the politics of abortion, and we want to focus on what's happening in Texas. Early this morning, legislators there revived an effort to restrict access to abortion in that state. The bill would ban most abortions after 20 weeks and it would also place new tough standards on existing clinics.

Read more
Race
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Housing Investigation Exposes Harassment Of LA's Minorities

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Coming up in a few minutes, we'll dive a little deeper into what's going on with the abortion debate in Texas. But first, we want to talk about a development that's affecting recipients of housing assistance in Los Angeles County. The U.S. Department of Justice this week ordered LA County and the cities of Lancaster and Palmdale, California to pay a total of $12.5 million in damages to residents of subsidized housing. That follows a two-year investigation by the department.

Read more

Pages