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NPR Story
3:09 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Author: 2nd Amendment's Only Sentence Generates Recurrent Debate

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 6:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear next about the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. It's a short one.

MICHAEL WALDMAN: One sentence, lots of commas and lots of confusion.

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Science
1:48 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Spiders Tune In To Web's Music To Size Up Meals And Mates

Hairlike sensors on the the legs of the golden silk spider help it "listen" to the thrum of its web.
I'll Never Grow Up Flickr

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 3:03 pm

Some of the toughest stuff in nature is spider silk — as strong, ounce for ounce, as nylon. And a silk web makes a great trap for prey, as well as a nice place for a spider to live.

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Around the Nation
1:47 am
Tue June 10, 2014

How Coal Industry Jobs Coexist With Rising Sea Levels In Virginia

Rough surf pounds a fishing pier as Tropical Storm Hanna passes through Virginia Beach, Va., in 2008. Virginia is dependent on coal mining but it also faces routine flooding from rising sea levels.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:49 am

Skip Stiles stands on the edge of a small inlet known as the Hague, near downtown Norfolk, Va. The Chrysler Museum of Art is nearby, as are dozens of stately homes, all threatened by the water.

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All Tech Considered
1:47 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Project Eavesdrop: An Experiment At Monitoring My Home Office

If someone tapped your Internet connection, what would they find out about you?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 12:55 pm

If someone tapped your Internet connection, what would he find out about you?

It's been just over a year since Edward Snowden became a household name, and his disclosures about the reach and extent of the National Security Agency's online monitoring programs led to headlines around the world.

But one big, basic question remains more or less unanswered: What exactly does the NSA's surveillance reveal?

To try to answer that question, I had my home office bugged.

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Politics
1:46 am
Tue June 10, 2014

In Booming San Jose, Businesses Settle Into A Minimum Wage Hike

Chuck Hammers, owner of Pizza My Heart in San Jose, Calif., raised prices on slices by 25 cents and pies by about $1 after the minimum wage increase, and says he hasn't experienced a drop in business.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:33 am

It's been a little more than a year since San Jose, Calif., increased the city's minimum wage by $2 per hour, with adjustments for inflation. Now at $10.15 an hour, it's one of the state's highest.

Back in 2012, as voters were debating the wage hike, some in the restaurant and hospitality industry warned that an increase would be bad for the sector. It would deter new businesses from opening, they said, and would cause existing businesses to slash hours for employees.

So how are San Jose's businesses faring today? The answer is, it depends.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Japan Says It Wants To Resume Larger Annual Whale Hunt

The Japanese whaling ship Yushin Maru leaves Shimonoseki port in Yamaguchi Prefecture, southwestern Japan, last month. Japan's prime minister says he wants to expand whaling operations after they were temporarily scaled back.
Kyodo/Landov

Japan, which earlier this year said it would scale back what it has described as "research whaling," is signaling that it wants to go back to a larger hunt.

"I want to aim for the resumption of commercial whaling by conducting whaling research," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said.

Japan, which is a signatory to a 1986 International Whaling Commission moratorium, has nonetheless continued to hunt cetaceans using a loophole in the ban that allows taking some whales for scientific purposes.

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

State Senator's Resignation Roils Virginia Politics

Virginia state Sen. Phillip P. Puckett, a Democrat, in February 2010. Puckett resigned his seat on Monday.
Steve Helber AP

A single legislator in Virginia's statehouse normally doesn't rate much attention beyond, say, his or her district or Richmond, the state capital.

But then again, the resignation of a single Democratic state senator doesn't normally shift control of Virginia's Senate from Democrats to Republicans — a move that possibly stops dead in its tracks Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe's plans to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

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Law
4:20 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Supreme Court Rules Against Homeowners In Superfund Case

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that a federal law seeking to improve accountability for environmental spills and pollution can be circumvented by certain kinds of state laws.

The federal Superfund law supersedes state statutes of limitations. Instead the federal law dictates that lawsuits alleging environmental injury need only be filed when individuals either first learn or should have learned that they have been harmed. But what the court gave with one hand, it took away with the other, ruling that rare state statutes of another sort can limit lawsuits in a different way.

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Beijing Denounces Vietnam, Philippines 'Farce' On Disputed Islands

A Vietnamese boat nearly under water is being towed after it was reportedly rammed by Chinese vessels near disputed Paracel Islands, late last month.
Reuters/Landov

China is calling a friendly get-together between soldiers of Vietnam and the Philippines on islands in the South China Sea claimed by Beijing "a clumsy farce," demanding that the two countries cease-and-desist.

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NPR Ed
3:15 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Why NYC Is Afraid Of Free Lunch For All

In New York, three-quarters of all students qualify for free or reduced-price meals, but a third of those simply don't participate.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 5:45 pm

More than 30 million kids a year participate in the National School Lunch Program, getting free or reduced-price meals at school. Hunger experts believe many more qualify but don't use it because a.) their families haven't filled out the necessary paperwork or b.) they don't want to be seen as poor.

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