KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio

Pages

Environment
3:25 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

On The Rebound, Panthers Prowl Expanding Swath Of Land In Florida

Panthers roam in rural Collier County, in southwest Florida. As the Florida state animal's population has grown, wildlife officials may seek to take the panther off the endangered species list.
Courtesy of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 4:31 pm

In Florida, the official state animal triggers mixed feelings. The Florida panther has been on the endangered species list for nearly 50 years. From a low point in the 1970s when there were only about 20 panthers in the wild, the species has rebounded.

Now, nearly 200 range throughout southwest Florida. And some officials, ranchers and hunters in the state say that may be about enough.

Florida panthers are a subspecies of the cougar or mountain lion. They're slightly smaller than their cousins, but like them, the panthers need lots of room to roam.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

#NPRreads: The 'Grexit,' Video Games And Fleeing The Rwandan Genocide

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 3:58 pm

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you five reads.

From Ina Jaffe, NPR's Los Angeles-based correspondent:

Read more
It's All Politics
2:03 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

A Conservative Firebrand From The Start, Ted Cruz Always Had A Plan

Cruz in his high school yearbook; he was president of the drama club.
Second Baptist High School

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 4:31 pm

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

Pilot In Solar-Powered Plane Sets Aviation Record

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 1:58 pm

A sun-powered airplane has landed in Hawaii after a five-day journey from Japan that smashed the previous record of 76 hours for the longest duration nonstop solo flight.

Pilot André Borschberg set the Solar Impulse 2 down on the tarmac at Kalaeloa Airport outside Honolulu after flying for 120 hours from Nagoya, his team reports.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:22 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Parts Of Social-Sharing Site Reddit Go Dark In Apparent User Revolt

The popular reddit question-and-answer section /r/IAmA, along with hundreds of others, has shut down in an apparent protest over the dismissal of a key figure at the social sharing site.
Screen grab from reddit.com

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 3:46 pm

An Internet insurrection is taking place on reddit, where moderators have shut down many of the social sharing site's most popular sections in an apparent protest over the dismissal of Victoria Taylor.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:22 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Iceland's Pirate Party Wins Repeal Of Blasphemy Law

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 10:46 am

Iceland's minority Pirate Party has its first major legislative victory — repealing a 75-year-old blasphemy law that made it a crime to "ridicule or insult" the teachings of a legally recognized religious community.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:26 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Aetna Announces $37 Billion Merger With Health Insurance Rival Humana

Health insurance giant Aetna has announced a $37 billion plan to acquire rival Humana.
Jessica Hill AP

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 10:01 am

In what could prove the largest-ever merger in the insurance industry, Aetna has announced a $37 billion deal to acquire rival Humana.

The agreement, announced by the Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna, "would bolster Aetna's presence in the state- and federally funded Medicaid program and Tricare coverage for military personnel and their families," according to The Associated Press.

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:00 am
Fri July 3, 2015

When The Fish You Eat Have Eaten Something Toxic

Barracuda are one kind of fish that has been implicated in poisoning with ciguatera toxin.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 8:12 am

Some tasty saltwater fish carry a toxin that you may never have heard of.

And a recent study found that more people in Florida may be getting sick from eating fish contaminated with the toxin than previously thought.

By comparing Florida public health records with survey results from thousands of fishermen, scientists from the University of Florida found that ciguatera fish poisoning, as the condition is called, is significantly underreported in the state.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:42 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Syrian Forces Try To Halt Rebel Offensive On Aleppo

Smoke rises after a reported barrel bomb attack by Syrian government forces in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on Wednesday.
Ameer al-Halibi APAImages/APA/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 8:07 am

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Syrian forces have carried out airstrikes to push back what is being described as a major offensive by militants affiliated with al-Qaida to seize the key northern city of Aleppo.

As NPR's Deborah Amos reports from the Turkish border, the battle surprised the regime, but also surprised more moderate rebels, who tell NPR they are not part of the offensive.

Read more
The Salt
7:24 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Why The World Might Be Running Out Of Cocoa Farmers

Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo walks past cocoa pods growing on a tree, on a cocoa farm outside the village of Fangolo, near Duekoue, Ivory Coast in May 2011.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 1:16 pm

Chocolate might be headed toward a crisis, depending on whom you ask.

That's at least what the 2015 Cocoa Barometer has to say. It's an overview of sustainability issues in the cocoa sector, written by various European and U.S. NGOs, and was released in the U.S. this week. And what they're really worried about is the people who grow the beans that are ground up to make our beloved treat.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:59 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Hours From Greek Bailout Vote, 2 Sides Evenly Divided

Thousands of people supporting a "no" vote on the country's referendum rally in Athens on Thursday.
Pacific Press/Barcroft India Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 11:32 am

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

Greece's prime minister has put his political clout behind the "no" camp in a referendum to decide whether the country should accept the terms of an international bailout. But the people appear to be evenly split on the issue, according to two new opinion polls.

One survey, conducted by the respected ALCO institute just 48 hours before the referendum that could decide Greece's economic fate and future in the eurozone, gives the "yes" camp 44.8 percent against 43.4 percent for the "no" side, according to Reuters.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:45 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Russia Finally Launches Supplies To ISS After Earlier Failures

A Russian Progress spacecraft blasts off from the launch pad at the Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on Friday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 8:08 am

A Russian rocket filled with much-needed supplies for the International Space Station lifted off from a pad in Kazakhstan early today after two previous re-supply missions failed.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports that the successful launch of the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, known as the Progress 60P, which is set to dock with the station on Sunday, was a relief to the astronauts and cosmonauts on the space station.

Read more
Animals
5:33 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Parrot On A Winning Streak Picks Japan To Win Women's World Cup

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Business
5:33 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Bubble Wrap Fans Were Outraged; Then Calmed Down

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. There was a big scare this week that bubble wrap as we know it is dead. The Internet flipped out when Sealed Air Corp announced a new type of bubble wrap. It'll be cheaper to store and ship but much less satisfying.

Read more
Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Peruvian Sisters Can Turn A Gourd Into An $800 Objet D'Art

Standing in their backyard in Cochas Grande, Peru, Katya and Blanca Cantos, hold the fruit of their labor. The gourd at left shows scenes from a potato harvest. The just-started gourd at right will tell the story of an ancestor's epic trek.
Josh Cogan Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archive, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 8:23 pm

Their gourds tell a story — and earn them a living. That gourd in the photo — the one on the left? It is covered with miniature pictures of a potato harvest in Peru. There's even a wee burro hauling the day's crop.

That gourd will sell for around $800.

Read more
The Salt
5:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

New Nation, New Cuisine: The First Cookbook To Tackle 'American Food'

A recent version of Indian Slapjacks, a recipe featured in American Cookery, the first cookbook of American food.
Premshree Pillai Flickr

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 10:45 am

In 1776, the American colonies declared independence from Britain.

But it wasn't until 1796 that someone dared to tackle a question that would plague every generation of Americans to come: "What is American food?"

American Cookery, the very first American cookbook, was written by Amelia Simmons (more on this mysterious woman later). In it, she promised local food and a kind of socioculinary equality. The title page stated that the recipes were "adapted to this country and all grades of life."

Read more
Europe
3:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

When Greeks Vote Sunday, It's Not Just About A Debt Deal

A man waits at an Athens bus stop where the Greek word "no" has been spray-painted over "yes" on a banner put up in advance of Sunday's referendum. Greek voters will say whether they want to accept or reject a deal that's been offered by the country's creditors. Greeks are deeply divided and analysts say the outcome is not clear.
Thanassis Stavrakis AP

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 10:20 am

Elisavet Zachariadou is a retired professor of history in Athens. She admires Italian art and reads French literature and German philosophy. She considers herself a European.

"When I learned that Greece is going to be part of the European Union [in the 1980s], I was very happy," she recalls. "And I said, 'How nice. And how good for all of us.' "

But Zachariadou's attachment to Europe is complex. She's 84 and lives in the Athens suburb where she grew up during World War II, when Nazi Germany invaded Greece and her people suffered horribly.

Read more
NPR Story
3:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

The Legal Business Of Marijuana Is Growing But The Industry Lacks Diversity

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 5:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Implementation Of Obamacare Remains A Work In Progress

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 11:15 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
3:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Why It's An Uphill Battle To Make Indianapolis A More Pedestrian Friendly City

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 5:33 am

Copyright 2015 WFYI-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wfyi.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree

Google's upcoming "now on tap" feature will let smartphone users ask a question within an app like Spotify.
Google Inside Search

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 6:17 am

The smartphone has become a staple of life. But what about the personal assistant inside that phone? Not so much.

Maybe you turn to Apple's Siri or Google Now for a quick search or a snarky answer to a question. But imagine a world where your phone actually gets you. You, personally. Turns out two tech giants — Google and Apple — disagree on whether that's a worthy goal.

Introducing 'Now On Tap'

Read more
NPR Story
1:16 am
Fri July 3, 2015

An iconic restaurant

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
1:16 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Las Posadas on the border

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
1:16 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Sabiduría: Rita Moreno

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Virginia's Pamunkey Tribe Granted Federal Recognition

The federal government Thursday granted recognition to the Pamunkey Indian tribe of Virginia. The tribe, whose members encountered the first permanent English settlers some 400 years ago, had long sought the recognition.

The Pamunkey tribe has just over 200 members, about a quarter of whom live on a reservation near Richmond.

The announcement by the Bureau of Indian Affairs that it would recognize the tribe is "vindication," said tribal Chief Kevin Brown.

Read more
Sports
4:35 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Royals All Star Voting Echoes Last Time MLB Fans Stuffed The Ballot Box

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
The Salt
4:13 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

White House: We Have A Beef With GMO Regulations

About 90 percent of America's soybeans are genetically modified.
iStockphoto

The U.S. government's system for regulating the products of biotechnology, including GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, was born in 1986, and it has been controversial from the start. Now, it will be getting a makeover — in part to assure the public that GMOs really are adequately regulated.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:38 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Small Donors Fueled Sanders' $15 Million Fundraising Haul

A supporter registers for a town hall meeting Thursday in Rochester, Minn.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 4:08 pm

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, running in the Democratic presidential primaries, has raised about $15 million, his campaign said Thursday.

His campaign emphasized the grass-roots strength of his fundraising: 250,000 donors making nearly 400,000 contributions of $250 or less.

The numbers come from a quarterly disclosure report being filed at the Federal Election Commission, and are measured from when Sanders launched his campaign April 30.

Read more
Economy
3:36 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

So Far, So Good For The Economy. But What About The Second Half?

A worker welds parts in fans for industrial ventilation systems at the Robinson Fans Inc. plant in Harmony, Pa., in February. Hourly wages in the U.S. remained unchanged last month.
Keith Srakocic AP

Maybe it seems like just yesterday that you were storing away your holiday decorations.

Maybe it actually was yesterday because life gets busy and tasks get put off, and before you know it, half the year is over and you're scrambling to catch up.

So in case you have been too busy to pay close attention, here's what we now know about the just-ended half of this year's economy:

Read more
Goats and Soda
3:34 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Yes, There Really Is A Town In Liberia Called 'Smell No Taste'

This is a photo taken in the town of Smell No Taste, where a teenager died of Ebola this past week. The home where he passed away is now under quarantine.
Abbas Dulleh AP

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 6:19 am

A curious detail appeared in stories about the death this week of a 17-year-old boy from Ebola.

Read more

Pages