Arun Rath

Beginning in October 2015, Arun Rath assumed a new role as a shared correspondent for NPR and Boston-based public broadcaster WGBH News. He is based in the WGBH newsroom and his time is divided between filing national stories for NPR and local stories for WGBH News.

In this role, Rath's reporting beat covers the science of learning, exploring how the brain functions – how we experience emotions, making errors or boredom – and how we respond to different styles of learning. The beat dovetails well with several of WGBH News' core regional coverage areas, bolstering its reporting on higher education (On Campus), innovation (Innovation Hub) and science (Living Lab from WGBH and WCAI in Woods Hole on Cape Cod).

Previously he served as weekend host of All Things Considered. In that role, every Saturday and Sunday, Rath and the All Things Considered team offered an hour-long exploration of compelling stories, along with in-depth interviews, breaking news, cultural reviews and reports from NPR bureaus throughout the U.S. and around the world.

Over his career, Rath has distinguished himself in public media as a reporter, producer and editor, including time as a senior reporter for the PBS series Frontline and The World® on WGBH Boston. He began his journalism career as an NPR intern at an NPR call-in program called Talk of the Nation, eventually joining the staff and becoming the show's director after working on several NPR News programs during the 1990s. In 2000, he became senior producer for NPR's On the Media, produced by WNYC, where he was part of a team that tripled its audience and won a Peabody Award. He spent 2005 as senior editor at the culture and arts show Studio 360 from PRI and WNYC. Rath moved to television in 2005 to report and manage radio partnerships for Frontline; he also reports on culture and music for the PBS series Sound Tracks. At Frontline and The World®, Rath specialized in national security and military justice. He reported and produced three films for Frontline, the latest being an investigation of alleged war crimes committed by U.S. Marines in Haditha, Iraq.

When Harry Selker was working as a cardiologist in the 1970s, clot-busting drugs were showing great promise against heart attacks. But their life-saving properties were very time sensitive. "If you give it within the first hour it has a 47 percent reduction of mortality; if you wait another hour, it has a 28 percent reduction; another hour, 23 percent. And people were taking about 90 minutes to make that decision," he recalls. "So they were losing the opportunity to save patients' lives."...

The construction of Camp 5 at the detention facility in Guantanamo Bay back in 2003 was taken as a sign that the prison was there to stay — "evolving from wire mesh to concrete," as reporter Charlie Savage wrote then in The Miami Herald. But today, because of a shrinking detainee population, Camp 5 is a thing of the past. "Camp 5 at Guantanamo Bay has been closed as a detention facility and re-purposed into another function and the detainees consolidated," according to Navy Capt....

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DNEgvjdM1k On Friday, the Dean of Harvard Law School, Martha Minow, endorsed a recommendation to change the school's official shield. That's because the shield contains the crest of Isaac Royall, a plantation owner, slave trader and justice of the peace from Antigua whose endowment of land helped establish the school. The recommendation came from a committee appointed by the Dean, but it was also one of several demands from a student group calling itself...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Yesterday, the dean of Harvard Law School endorsed a recommendation to change the school's official shield because it contains the crest of Isaac Royall, a slave owner whose endowment of land helped establish the school. The recommendation came from a committee appointed by the dean, but it was also one of several demands from a student group calling itself Reclaim Harvard Law, and organization that...

On the drive to Fairview Cemetery in the Boston neighborhood of Hyde Park, six seniors from Roxbury Latin boys' school sit in silent reflection. Mike Pojman, the school's assistant headmaster and senior adviser, says the trip is a massive contrast to the rest of their school day, and to their lives as a whole right now. Today the teens have volunteered to be pallbearers for a man who died alone in September, and for whom no next of kin was found. He's being buried in a grave with no tombstone...

Urban foraging might call to mind images of hipsters picking food out of the trash. But one group in Massachusetts eats only the finest, freshest produce. The League of Urban Canners harvests fruit from trees in Cambridge and Somerville and turns it into jam. Sam Christy, a local high school teacher, started the league four years ago. "I think the first year we thought if we can harvest maybe 50 quarts of jam.
Ended up being 200 quarts, and then it sort of grew from there," he says. "We...

Sunday is my last broadcast as host of Weekend All Things Considered at NPR West. I'm moving back to Boston, and with packing well underway, after the broadcast I'll be sleeping between piles of hastily labeled boxes. Weirdly, a couple of weeks ago I experienced a nightmare version of this very scene, when I attended a show called The Object Lesson at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City, Calif. "This is not respectable theater. I don't even know if it is theater,"...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: President Obama has arrived in New York City for the United Nations General Assembly. Obama plans to take advantage of the gathering of world leaders to meet face-to-face with several of his counterparts. The most anticipated meeting he'll hold is with Russian president, Vladimir Putin. It comes as Russia has been getting more involved with the war in Syria, complicating U.S. efforts in the Middle East....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Life is intense for cadets at the Military Academy at West Point. With intense physical training and battle simulations, people can get hurt. And last month, one skirmish left 30 cadets with injuries, including 24 concussions, one report of a broken nose, one dislocated shoulder and lots of scrapes and bruises and blood. What caused the carnage? (SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND TRUMPET MUSIC) RATH: Pillows. ...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Tonight was supposed to be a big night for Donald Trump. He was scheduled to speak to an important group of conservative activists in Atlanta. That was until he spoke on CNN last night. Trump criticized Fox News host Megyn Kelly for asking tough questions during Thursday's Republican debate. What Trump said may be offensive to some listeners. As you're about to hear, he seemed to suggest Kelly's tone had...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Now let's take moment to remember one of the icons of pro wrestling. (SOUNDBITE OF WRESTLING MATCH ANNOUNCEMENT) UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Approaching ringside from west coast Dublin, weighing 232 pounds, Rowdy Roddy Piper. RATH: Rowdy Roddy Piper, born Roderick George Toombs. He first appeared in the ring in Canada at the age of 15. He wore a kilt - you've got to be tough to pull that off - and bagpipes...

The Syrian refugee crisis is getting worse by the day. Not only are more refugees fleeing into Lebanon, but aid to those who have already arrived is being cut dramatically. The United Nations World Food Program earlier this month slashed the monthly food subsidy for Syrian refugees in Lebanon to just $13.50 per person. Less than a year ago the figure was $30 per person per month. The reason for the decision was reportedly a budget shortfall. In addition, tensions are growing between Lebanese...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Our own producer, Rebecca Hersher, is just back from a six-week reporting trip where she was embedded with the Afghan army. Now she's back with me in the studio. Hi Becky, good... REBECCA HERSHER, BYLINE: Hi. RATH: ...To have you back. HERSHER: Thanks. RATH: So you and I have been chatting a little bit this week about your trip. And one thing that was interesting - I know a lot of people have been asking...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. (SOUNDBITE OF ORIGINAL THX SOUND LOGO) RATH: Don't get excited. NPR is not coming to you now in 7.1 surround sound, although that would be cool. Actually, we wanted to play you the new version of that THX sound logo you hear before movies. The company says the new version is intensely more complex, taking the audience on an epic sensory journey. ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qt435yF2Qg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saN1BwlxJxA This week sees the 50th anniversary of a sacred day for many music fans. On Dec. 9, 1964, the John Coltrane Quartet recorded the album A Love Supreme . I call it a sacred day for music fans, not just jazz fans. For people across musical boundaries and cultures — for Carlos Santana, Bono, Joni Mitchell, Steve Reich, Bootsy Collins, Gil Scott-Heron — hearing A Love Supreme was a revelation. ...

In Los Angeles, more than a thousand people sleep on the street in cardboard boxes and tents — just a mile away from City Hall. This is Skid Row, and compared to the affluent downtown areas that practically surround it, the area is like a different planet. Fifty blocks of sidewalk are jammed with people who live on the street, with all of their worldly possessions crammed into shopping carts and crates. In the hot midday Southern California sun, the place stinks of urine, human excrement and...

Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. It has been a grim Easter Sunday for relatives of passengers who were on the ferry that capsized off the coast of South Korea on Wednesday. The death toll from that disaster is now over 50, with about 240 people still missing, most of them high school students. Today, divers started retrieving bodies from inside the vessel. NPR's Anthony Kuhn is covering the story in Seoul and joins us now. Anthony, it took...

Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Now to Venezuela where violent clashes continue between antigovernment protesters and national guard security forces who are using water cannons and tear gas to break up demonstrations. On Friday, dozens of people, including journalists, were arrested. And on Saturday, more protests erupted around the city. So far, 18 people have died. Joining us now in Caracas is reporter Girish Gupta who has been covering the unrest. Girish, tell us what things are like there...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMRmV1Sj6j4 The Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki turned 80 on Saturday. You may think you've never heard Penderecki's music, but I'm guessing you have — because I'm guessing you've seen The Shining. Listen closely to parts of Utrenja or Polymorphia and you'll have a hard time not picturing Jack Nicholson's menacing figure. Kubrick's movie terrified me as a kid. I assumed the scary music had been composed specifically for the...

If you were listening to NPR 10 years ago this week, you might have heard this enthusiastic proclamation: "The wait is finally over for architect Frank Gehry , for the musicians and staff of the LA Philharmonic, and for all of Los Angeles. Tonight, for the first time in public, the orchestra plays its magnificent new instrument: Walt Disney Concert Hall." The voice was that of KUSC's Gail Eichenthal, speaking alongside Performance Today 's Fred Child from the broadcast booth at the...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZ5hTfDzU9A http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMUM_ANh8Fg Philip Glass has achieved a rare feat for an American composer. He's embraced by the musical establishment, and his music is heard far outside classical circles. ( Beck recently helped him produce a tribute album .) But as a revival of Glass' most famous opera, Einstein on the Beach , hits the Los Angeles Opera this weekend, attended by the likes of Kim and Kanye , it's easy to forget just...

Herman Wallace died early Friday in New Orleans, three days after gaining his freedom. Wallace had spent the previous 41 years in solitary confinement in Louisiana. While already serving a 50-year sentence for armed robbery, Wallace was convicted of the murder of a prison guard in 1974, along with Robert King and Albert Woodfox. The men became known as the Angola 3 for spending most of their years in solitary confinement at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, also called Angola. All of them...

This past week may have been a rough one for the classical world , but there is something to look forward to. This coming week, we celebrate the 200th birthday of Giuseppe Verdi , composer of the best opera of all time. (That's right, Wagner fans. Start writing those letters.) I'm talking about Verdi's spectacular rendering of Othello, the Moor of Venice. A Shakespearean tragedy helps to class up a genre that tends to run toward the sordid. And, dare I say it, Verdi made a...