Jeff Reynolds

Operations Manager

Email:  jeff(at)kvnf.org

Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears chats with gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen. Spring is in the air & topics range from grubs & grasshoppers to dandelions, lawn violets & mountain croquet. Callers -  Patty asks about grasshoppers and Larry comments about the usefulness of "naked" ground.

Our regular host Jill Spears is back from her election hiatus, and gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen join her for the Spring Pledge Drive Edition of As the Worm Turns.

Public Domain, w/restoration by Adam Cuerden

My earliest memory of the night sky begins with the nursery rhyme:

Star light, Star Bright,
First Star I see tonight.
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.

Zephyros Farm and Garden

Guest host Peggy Soup welcomes Daphne Yannakakis of Zephyros Farm & Garden to the studio for a lively chat about spring gardening.

Art Trevena

What’s a sure sign of spring? Daffodils emerging in the garden, cheerful songbirds in the trees? These are familiar, terrestrial indicators.

The celestially-minded look upward for their sign— to a softly luminous beehive appearing above the western horizon, shortly after twilight ends. This faint but lovely sight is known as the zodiacal light.

Suze Smith

Host Peggy Soup welcomes gardener & landscaper Wind Clearwater to the Bamboo Room, for a discussion about biodynamics and permaculture. They take questions & comments about bindweed & bonsai.

Guest host Peggy Soup welcomes Lloyd Nelson to the program to talk about biodynamics.

Biodynamic calendars mentioned in the program:
Maria Thun
Stella Natura

 

Credit: NASA, ESA, and Amy Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center) et al.

This March is an ideal time to view the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. On March 8th, Jupiter, the Earth and the Sun were in a line, an annual event called opposition. This happens when Jupiter is closer to Earth than during other times of the year, making Jupiter appear bigger and brighter.

Guest Host Peggy Soup & Gardening Guru Lance Swigart  discuss compost, signs of early spring and other seasonal gardening subjects.

Guest host Peggy Soup & gardening guru Lance Swigart chat about composting.

By Anirban Nandi (Own work) [<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AOrion_constellation_with_star_labels.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

The first constellation most of us are able to find in the night sky is Ursa Major, the Great Bear.  Most people know the brighter stars as the Big Dipper asterism.  For many of us, the next constellation we discover is Orion, the Hunter.  At this time of year you can see it in the southern sky shortly after sunset.  The brighter stars include Betelgeuse, Rigel, and the easy-to-identify three stars of the belt.

The Brothers Comatose

The Brothers Comatose, a southwestern-tinged, rowdy stringband from San Francisco, dropped by the KVNF Bamboo Room the day after their recent engagement at Fly Me To the Moon Saloon in Telluride. They chatted with KVNF DJ Adam Gall, and shared a few tunes.

The band is touring in support of their new CD, 'City Painted Gold.'

Guest host Peggy Soup chats with gardening guru Lance Swigart and special guest Ron Godin, Area Extension Agent with CSU Extension. The subject is soil fertility.

Ron can be reached for more information here.

Suze Smith

Guest host Peggy Soup & gardening expert Lance Swigart discuss a few more pruning tips to wrap up last week's topic, then spend the rest of the hour talking about grains.  A book that was discussed in the show is Small-Scale Grain Raising by Gene Logsdon.

CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

If any of you have attended an astronomy event during the warm season, then you may recall the stars of summer, such as Antares, Vega, and Albireo.  There are several bright stars in winter that are of interest on our cold, clear nights.  One advantage to winter viewing is that dark skies arrive early.


Guest host Peggy Soup chats with gardening guru Lance Swigart about pruning.

Host Jill Spears is taking a break from the airwaves while she runs for a position on the Paonia Town Council. In her stead, farmer & ag marketer Peggy Soup takes over the host chair. In this episode she visits with gardening guru Lance Swigart about seed saving for biannual plants.

NASA/JPL (Public Domain)

The planet Mercury is the closest planet to our Sun.  Its average distance from the Sun is only 35 million miles. Mercury has the fastest orbital speed in the Solar System…88 days.  Perhaps this is why the planet is named after the speedy messenger to the Roman gods!

Handmade Moments in a horse-drawn wagon
Teya Cranson

Sultry, Sensual, and Sexy: these are words that describe the music of Handmade Moments, aka Anna Horton and Joel Ludford. The Moments, as they are sometimes called, have built a solid reputation for the intricate interplay between their acoustic instruments and their impressive vocals. They've composed a modern sound made of two distinct traditions: folk and jazz.

Alicia Rose

Very few musicians of any stripe so personify a musical genre as completely as Tony Furtado embodies Americana roots music. Tony is an evocative and soulful singer, a wide-ranging songwriter and a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist adept on banjo, cello-banjo, slide guitar and baritone ukulele who mixes and matches sounds and styles with the flair of a master chef. (He’s also an accomplished sculptor, but that’s another story.) All of the music of America is in Tony’s music.

Host Jill Spears welcomes gardening guru Lance Swigart back to the studio, along with special guest Sarah Pope, Seed Librarian for the Delta County Library District. They discuss seed saving and seed libraries, which allow patrons to check out locally-grown seeds for planting in their own gardens.

The New Year is well upon us. This is always a good time to reflect on the year gone by and look to the new adventure that is about to begin. By now you’ve probably set your resolutions for 2016. The national parks are no different. 2015 was a banner year for dark skies throughout the Colorado Plateau, but we still have much work to do in 2016.

Host Jill Spears welcomes guest gardener Peggy Soup to the studio for a friendly chat on a variety of agricultural subjects.

Art Trevena

Comets are small, icy and rocky bodies that orbit the Sun. Many comets have highly elongated orbits that extend to the farthest reaches of our solar system, out to a sizeable fraction of the distances to the nearest stars. Out there, in what astronomers have termed the Oort Cloud, a vast collection of comets is thought to exist.

Host Jill Spears is joined by gardener Amber Kleinman & special guest Maria Hodkins of Butter & Love, a certified traditional foods cook & instructor and fermentation specialist. They discuss many aspects of fermented foods such as sauerkraut, and share tips on fermenting at home.

Maria can be reached at 970-527-8928 or realbutterandlove@gmail.com.

One resource that was mentioned is the book "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Fermenting Foods" by Wardeh Harmon.

Bad weather prevented our scheduled guest gardener from getting to the studio, so this week's show was an encore airing of the program originally aired on Nov. 24th, 2015. Tune in next Tuesday, Dec. 29th, for a regular live program.

Art Trevena

In late December the Sun follows a southerly path across our Western Slope skies, and daylight hours are short.   December 21 at 9:48 p.m.

Host Jill Spears welcomes guest gardener Amber Kleinman to the air, for a chat about food canning & preserving.

We Have A Winner!

Dec 11, 2015
Koro Sun Resort

Jeff Ruppert of Paonia gets a special phone call from the KVNF studio Friday evening...

Brocken Inaglory - This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

A Primer on Meteor Showers

Typically, meteor showers occur when the Earth passes through particle clouds left by the passage of a comet.  The particles burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere, resulting in a brief streak of light.  The particles can range in size from dust to 33 feet in diameter.

The terms “meteor,” “meteoroid,” and “meteorite” are related, but are not identical terms.

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