Jeff Reynolds

Operations Manager

Email:  jeff(at)kvnf.org

NASA

One year ago, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft made its historic flyby of Pluto.

CCO Public Domain

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen discuss the latest news from their gardens. A whole lotta plantin' still going on.

Something took out Lulu's squash plants - a mystery!

Volunteer plants popping up here & there - tomatoes, squash, etc.

 

Chelsea Bookout

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen dig deep into summer garden tips. Georgia calls with a question about fire blight. Toni wonders what to do with wild sumac berries. Lance has a trick question about mulberries.

Joyce Tanihara

It’s a dark area broken by the faint glow of red lights, and your eyes are just adjusting to make out a figure, hunched over what vaguely looks to be a telescope.

“Hey, I’ve got Saturn!” exclaims the figure. “I’ve got a double star,” shouts another voice. “I’ve got the Andromeda galaxy. Come take a look!” says someone toward the back.

Chelsea Bookout

Summer is here & the gardening crew is deep in the thick of it. Jill, Lulu & Lance are joined this week by special guest Ron Godin, Soil Scientist from CSU Extension. He discusses treating peach trees for gummosis, a fungal disease, and using specific cover crops to help control pests such as soil nematodes.  Did you know that winter rye can actually crowd out bindweed?

Spring turns into summer - a solstice edition of the show! Jill, Lance & Lulu discuss the latest news from the gardens, and take calls.

If you look to the east after sunset, you will notice a bright, reddish-orange object.  This is the planet Mars, 4th rock from the Sun.  Less than one month ago, Mars was at opposition.  This means that it is directly opposite from the Sun, as we view it.  This also means that it is very bright, because it is reflecting light directly back to us.  Opposition is the planetary equivalent of a full moon. 

The diameter of Mars is about 4200 miles, compared to Earth’s diameter of about 8,000 miles and its mass is just 11% of Earth’s.  On May 30, Mars was 47 million miles from Earth.

CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

The KVNF gardening crew, Jill, Lance & Lulu, dive deep into spring gardening tips.

Anthony calls in to ask about thinning apples.
Leta calls from Redvale with a question about keeping birds off her big old apricot tree.
Ridgway Sue has a surprising suggestion for Leta. David calls with input about garlic.

© Mark Dixon https://www.flickr.com/photos/9602574@N02/9556629907

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart start off with recommendations for dealing with bindweed.
Georgia calls with a question about thinning pears. Previous caller Anthony calls back to get more info about coddling moths, and also advice about potatoes.
Lulu gives her tips for how to use garlic scapes.

Imagine… You are on an exo-planet circling a star in the Hydra Galaxy Cluster.  Your powerful telescope zeroes in on a planet 150 million light-years away.  The planet is called Earth, but you won’t be seeing 2016 human inhabitants, you will be seeing images of dinosaurs… Images carried on light that left the Earth 150 million years ago.

You will be looking back in time.

CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

Our gardening crew, Jill, Lulu & Lance, discuss the prospects for an epic fruit harvest this year. Lance explains how, when (and why) to thin the crop.

Sue calls in a question about an especially fragrant tree-shrub that she encountered.

Max submits an answer to Lance's "carrot bed trivia" question from last week.

More spring tips from gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen, hosted by Jill Spears.

R. Hazzard

  The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the word “festival” as “a special time or event when people gather to celebrate something.” In Colorado we love our festivals. Here, you can celebrate wildflowers, hot air balloons, rodeos, sweet corn, your favorite beverage, and bluegrass. On the Western Slope, there is another type of festival, and it’s coming up very soon. The 7th Annual Astronomy Festival will be held at Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park from June 1st through the 4th. 

garden, spring, paonia community garden
Laura Palmisano

    

Host Jill Spears and gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen are joined by special guest Wind Clearwater for a lively discussion of spring gardening topics.

A spell of cool, wet weather has our gardeners dealing with mud as best they can!

Jill, Lance & Lulu discuss a variety of issues, (including the reasons behinds Lulu deciding to shave her cat!)

Rick called with questions about growing potatoes in whiskey barrels.

Discussing weeds, Lulu recommends a book: Weeds of the West  by Tom D. Whitson, Larry C. Burrill, et al.

  What’s that brilliant, orange “star” rising in the southeast after twilight ends?  It’s actually not a star, but the planet Mars, which is now nearing Earth for its closest encounter since year 2005.  

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The full flush of spring has arrived and our gardening gurus are in the thick of it! Host Jill Spears and experts Lulu Volckhausen and Lance Swigart have a wide-ranging discussion.

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen chat about spring in the garden.

Art Trevena

A rare cosmic event will occur on the morning of May 9, 2016.  Mercury, the innermost, smallest, and speediest planet, will appear to cross the sun’s disk, as seen from Earth.

Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears chats with gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen. Spring is in the air & topics range from grubs & grasshoppers to dandelions, lawn violets & mountain croquet. Callers -  Patty asks about grasshoppers and Larry comments about the usefulness of "naked" ground.

Our regular host Jill Spears is back from her election hiatus, and gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen join her for the Spring Pledge Drive Edition of As the Worm Turns.

Public Domain, w/restoration by Adam Cuerden

My earliest memory of the night sky begins with the nursery rhyme:

Star light, Star Bright,
First Star I see tonight.
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.

Zephyros Farm and Garden

Guest host Peggy Soup welcomes Daphne Yannakakis of Zephyros Farm & Garden to the studio for a lively chat about spring gardening.

Art Trevena

What’s a sure sign of spring? Daffodils emerging in the garden, cheerful songbirds in the trees? These are familiar, terrestrial indicators.

The celestially-minded look upward for their sign— to a softly luminous beehive appearing above the western horizon, shortly after twilight ends. This faint but lovely sight is known as the zodiacal light.

Suze Smith

Host Peggy Soup welcomes gardener & landscaper Wind Clearwater to the Bamboo Room, for a discussion about biodynamics and permaculture. They take questions & comments about bindweed & bonsai.

Guest host Peggy Soup welcomes Lloyd Nelson to the program to talk about biodynamics.

Biodynamic calendars mentioned in the program:
Maria Thun
Stella Natura

 

Credit: NASA, ESA, and Amy Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center) et al.

This March is an ideal time to view the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. On March 8th, Jupiter, the Earth and the Sun were in a line, an annual event called opposition. This happens when Jupiter is closer to Earth than during other times of the year, making Jupiter appear bigger and brighter.

Guest Host Peggy Soup & Gardening Guru Lance Swigart  discuss compost, signs of early spring and other seasonal gardening subjects.

Guest host Peggy Soup & gardening guru Lance Swigart chat about composting.

By Anirban Nandi (Own work) [<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AOrion_constellation_with_star_labels.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

The first constellation most of us are able to find in the night sky is Ursa Major, the Great Bear.  Most people know the brighter stars as the Big Dipper asterism.  For many of us, the next constellation we discover is Orion, the Hunter.  At this time of year you can see it in the southern sky shortly after sunset.  The brighter stars include Betelgeuse, Rigel, and the easy-to-identify three stars of the belt.

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