Linda Wertheimer

As NPR's senior national correspondent, Linda Wertheimer travels the country and the globe for NPR News, bringing her unique insights and wealth of experience to bear on the day's top news stories.

A respected leader in media and a beloved figure to listeners who have followed her three-decade-long NPR career, Wertheimer provides clear-eyed analysis and thoughtful reporting on all NPR News programs.

Before taking the senior national correspondent post in 2002, Wertheimer spent 13 years hosting of NPR's news magazine All Things Considered. During that time, Wertheimer helped build the afternoon news program's audience to record levels. The show grew from six million listeners in 1989 to nearly 10 million listeners by spring of 2001, making it one of the top afternoon drive-time, news radio programs in the country. Wertheimer's influence on All Things Considered — and, by extension, all of public radio — has been profound.

She joined NPR at the network's inception, and served as All Things Considered's first director starting with its debut on May 3, 1971. In the more than 40 years since, she has served NPR in a variety of roles including reporter and host.

From 1974 to 1989, Wertheimer provided highly praised and award-winning coverage of national politics and Congress for NPR, serving as its congressional and then national political correspondent. Wertheimer traveled the country with major presidential candidates, covered state presidential primaries and the general elections, and regularly reported from Congress on the major events of the day — from the Watergate impeachment hearings to the Reagan Revolution to historic tax reform legislation to the Iran-Contra affair. During this period, Wertheimer covered four presidential and eight congressional elections for NPR.

In 1976, Wertheimer became the first woman to anchor network coverage of a presidential nomination convention and of election night. Over her career at NPR, she has anchored ten presidential nomination conventions and 12 election nights.

Wertheimer is the first person to broadcast live from inside the United States Senate chamber. Her 37 days of live coverage of the Senate Panama Canal Treaty debates won her a special Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University award.

In 1995, Wertheimer shared in an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award given to NPR for its coverage of the first 100 days of the 104th Congress, the period that followed the 1994 Republican takeover of Congress.

Wertheimer has received numerous other journalism awards, including awards from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for her anchoring of The Iran-Contra Affair: A Special Report, a series of 41 half-hour programs on the Iran-Contra congressional hearings, from American Women in Radio/TV for her story Illegal Abortion, and from the American Legion for NPR's coverage of the Panama Treaty debates.

in 1997, Wertheimer was named one of the top 50 journalists in Washington by Washingtonian magazine and in 1998 as one of America's 200 most influential women by Vanity Fair.

A graduate of Wellesley College, Wertheimer received its highest alumni honor in 1985, the Distinguished Alumna Achievement Award. Wertheimer holds honorary degrees from Colby College, Wheaton College, and Illinois Wesleyan University.

Prior to joining NPR, Wertheimer worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation in London and for WCBS Radio in New York.

Her 1995 book, Listening to America: Twenty-five Years in the Life of a Nation as Heard on National Public Radio, published by Houghton Mifflin, celebrates NPR's history.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: Sounds from the funeral rites for Justice Antonin Scalia today. The mass for Antonin Scalia continues at this hour at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. The basilica is the largest Catholic church in North America. It sits just a few miles from the Supreme Court building where Scalia served for nearly 30 years. Justice Scalia died a week ago in Texas...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: The week of mourning that followed the death of Justice Antonin Scalia has been a reminder of a different kind of time in Washington. Scalia was a brilliant man, a philosopher controversial for some of his theories about the living or dead Constitution. He did not think the Constitution was a living document. He was a great writer, remembered for scorching and quotable opinions and dissents of the...

Now that we've all had a wonderful time over the holidays, we can begin thinking about the election. Let me begin by saying that there are few things more exciting to me than an election year. Back in the day, I'd be headed for Iowa or maybe New Hampshire about now. Because coming right up are the first real judgments by real people. Over several months, we get to hear what ought to happen from our fellow Americans in states in all parts of the country — in places very different from Iowa and...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan said today a series of mistakes led to an American airstrike that killed at least 31 people in a hospital in the town of Kunduz. Gen. John Campbell briefed reporters on the October 3 bombing. With more, we're joined by NPR's Pentagon reporter Tom Bowman. Tom, you just heard what Gen. Campbell had to say about this strike that hit a hospital. Let's listen to some...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: The man often described as the most successful former president of the United States spoke today for 40 minutes about his health at a news conference. Jimmy Carter, who left office almost 35 years ago after a difficult single term, had recently been diagnosed with melanoma. Today he met with reporters to say the cancer has now been found in his brain. Joining us to talk about the event is NPR's Linda...

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This at Home series, chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen. This week: We learn an unusual technique for cooking eggs to give you a silky, yolky sauce for huevos racheros. The Chef I grew up in a small mining town in the West, Carlsbad...

Americans love competitors — in business, in politics, and in sports. And for some of us from the bad old days when only the guys got to play team sports, it's a very special thing to see women blowing through doors that not so long ago were closed to them. Consider Katie Ledecky. The American swimmer has been the gracious, warm-hearted, smiley, cutthroat competitor in the World Swimming Championships in Russia, mopping up the pool (if such a thing could be done) with everyone else, winning...

We are moving into the election season — feels like we're moving faster and faster, candidates are already in the early states — notably the newly announced Hillary Clinton. She headed right to Iowa for some close encounters with voters. Republicans, reportedly a score or so, are in New Hampshire this weekend, taking turns shaking hands with voters, I've spent a fair amount of time over the years covering presidential campaigns, and there's an order of march for this parade. First in the ...

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W.Va., but you'll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta. While most of America's china factories have closed, unable to compete with "made in China" or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people. Walk into the big, dim factory buildings, dusty and...

Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: On July 7, 2005 - nine years ago tomorrow - a series of explosions in central London killed 52 people and injured over 700 others. One of the bombers, Germaine Lindsay, was married to Samantha Lewthwaite, a white, working-class girl from southern England. They had both converted to Islam. Lewthwaite denounced her husband's actions after the attacks, but then her life took another mysterious turn. She left England in 2008 and moved to South Africa and from...

Brian Crecente, who is covering the Game Developers Conference this week for the video game website Polygon, talks about the latest trends in the industry.

U.N. investigators are gathering the names of people they suspect of war crimes in Syria. In their latest report, they say all sides in the conflict are committing atrocities against civilians. We hear from Karen Abuzayd, who is with the U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Syria.

A Wheel of Fortune contestant guessed a 12-letter phrase in the bonus round Wednesday night with only two letters revealed — and he won $45,000.

Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Little Big's Bakery in South Portland, Maine worked up its version of the cronut, the croissant-donut hybrid. The Mainers tried to stand out, spelling theirs C-R-A-U-X-nut. But the original New York baker sent a letter saying he has trademarked the cronut name, no matter how you spell it. So Little Big's took another stab at it. Now they call their popular pastry C-and-Ds - standing for cease and desist. It's MORNING...

Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. Today the State Department advised all U.S. citizens to leave Yemen because of extremely high danger for Americans there. The U.S. Air Force has flown some State Department personnel out of the capital, Sana'a. In all, 19 U.S. embassies and consulates remain closed across the Middle East and Africa because of a security threat. We're hearing more about...

Lindy Boggs died Saturday morning. She was 97 years old, had served in Congress for close to 20 years and also as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican, appointed by President Bill Clinton. But those achievements, great as they are, do not begin to sum up the life and accomplishments of Lindy Boggs. As many of you know, she is part of our family at NPR: Her daughter is Cokie Roberts . And she has many friends here, as she does everywhere. Lindy was born in the spring of 1916. She went to college...

Robert Rotenberg has written four legal thrillers set in Toronto, that old industrial city on the shores of Lake Ontario. He's a criminal lawyer — all his books are centered on trials — and he loves his city so much that he makes multicultural Toronto a character in his books. His first release, Old City Hall , is even named after a Toronto landmark: a beautiful stone building that is now used as a courthouse. Real Courtrooms, Real Courtesy In that first novel, a trial takes...

Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The morning after pill is moving from behind the counter to on the shelf. Last night, the Obama administration announced it will comply with a court order that allows girls and women of any age to buy the emergency contraception without a prescription and without showing ID. This decision is a sharp reversal for the administration and signals the end of...

Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The Whitehouse has announced that President Obama's National Security Advisor is resigning and he will be replaced by Susan Rice, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. NPR's Ron Elving is here to tell us more. Ron, some months ago, Ms. Rice was rumored to be nominated Secretary of State - that, of course, did not happen. So why don't you give us a...

Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: Leader from around the world have arrived in Venezuela to pay their final respects to President Hugo Chavez, who used his country's oil wealth to put in place his vision of socialism during 14 years in power. And this larger-than-life leader presumably will continue to inspire his followers. The Venezuelan government plans to embalm his body and keep it on display in a glass coffin. NPR's Juan Forero is in Caracas following events there. He joins us now....

Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: Iran now says compromise on its nuclear program may be possible. Of course, that comes with a number of ifs. Tehran says that's if international negotiators continue to take what it calls a more realistic approach. The big question, Western officials say, is whether Iran is willing to curb its nuclear activities. That is the message, after a two-day meeting between Iran and six world powers. NPR's Peter Kenyon joins us from Almaty, Kazakhstan where the talks...

Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. President Obama is traveling in Asia this week, reasserting his foreign policy role after months of focus on his re-election bid. But even as the president works to shore up relationships around the world, Republican members of Congress continue to challenge the administration's handling of the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. And...

Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. Former CIA Director David Petraeus is testifying before two congressional committees today. He's been called to discuss the CIA's role in the attack at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, back in September; an attack that took the lives of four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens. This also happens to be General Petraeus' first public appearance...