Stephanie Paige Ogburn

Stephanie Paige Ogburn has been reporting from Colorado for more than five years, primarily from the Western Slope.

She was previously a reporter at ClimateWire, an editor at High Country News and a reporter at the Cortez Journal. When not reporting, she enjoys backpacking, mountain biking, growing food, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Diesel trucks used to be known for belching black, polluting exhaust. Over the years, manufacturers have worked hard to shed that image, building cleaner engines. But there's a small group of diesel truck owners who are going in the opposite direction.

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It’s May in Rocky Mountain National Park, but on a mountainside 10,829 feet above sea level, snow is falling. It’s pelting Jim Cheatham, a biologist with the National Park Service. Shrugging off the cold, Cheatham seizes a teachable moment. This snow, he said, holds more than just water.

“Chances are it’s carrying the excess nitrogen we’re talking about,” mused Cheatham.

For the past eight years, the biologist has spent most of his time thinking about how nitrogen pollution is changing the park’s forests, wildflowers, and alpine lakes. He’s also been looking for a way to stop it.

What comes to mind when you think about milk? Like it or loathe it, you probably associate it with cereal, Oreos and milk mustaches. One thing you probably don't think about? Energy.

It turns out, it takes a lot of energy to make a gallon of milk. Recently, a few Colorado dairymen have been working to lighten their milk's energy load.

This fall, the highly publicized death of Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old with terminal brain cancer who decided to end her life, brought the "right to die" movement a lot of attention.

Anne Singer, campaigns communications manager at the group Compassion and Choices, which advocates for death with dignity, as it is sometimes called, said the public response has been astonishing.

"Nothing like this has ever happened to our organization before. Our website crashed…the momentum is definitely picking up."