Crop-dusting pilots are the adrenaline junkies of the agriculture world. They whiz through the air, flying under power lines to sow seeds or spread pesticides on farmers' fields.

It's a dangerous job, and now these pilots are facing a new challenge — short towers that can sprout up in fields overnight. These towers are used to gather data for wind energy companies.

Tomorrow Hill Farm (CC-BY)

It's been a dramatic couple of months at the Grand Junction Regional Airport, since FBI agents searched the airport's administrative offices in early November and seized some documents as part of a fraud investigation.

Jim Brett

Herb Anderson parks his plane on the tarmac at the North Fork Valley Airport in Paonia. He’s one of a handful of pilots and aviation fans out for a Saturday-morning “fly-in, drive-in” breakfast. Like some of the others here today, his plane is “experimental,” which basically just means he built it himself. 

Born and raised just west of Olathe, Herb started flying when he was a sophomore at Olathe High School, or as he tells it, when he wasn't there: he used to play hookie to take flying lessons.