birth control

  • Republican anti-immigration activist Tom Tancredo to run for governor
  • Conundrum Hot Springs will have permit reservation system next year
  • Over 50 thousand women in Colorado could lose birth control coverage
  • Lawmakers poised to introduce a variety of measures against opioids
  • Towns around the state becoming compliant with state marijuana regs

Less than half of young men have heard of emergency contraception, a recent study found, even though it's available over the counter at drug stores and is effective at preventing pregnancy after sex.

When President Obama spoke to the Democratic National Convention in Colorado seven years ago, he tried to call a truce in one of the nation's long-running social debates.

"We may not agree on abortion. But surely we can agree on reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies in this country," he said to applause.

Not long after that, Colorado launched an experiment aimed at doing just that. The results have been dramatic — but efforts to expand the program using taxpayer money have hit a political roadblock.

Colorado's IUD Program Secures Another Year Of Funding

Aug 26, 2015

A program to provide long acting reversible contraceptives to low-income women has been funded for another year. About a dozen health and community foundations have stepped up to provide the funds, something the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment had been working overtime to try and secure.

KVNF Regional Newscast: Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Jun 24, 2015

Newscast

  • Delta County man diagnosed with infectious disease
  • Two dead, two missing in Colorado rivers over the weekend
  • Judge won’t dismiss case against Grand Junction over panhandling ordinance
  • Birth control program gets another year of funding despite lack of legislative support

KVNF Regional Newscast: Thursday, June 18, 2015

Jun 18, 2015

  Newscast

  • DMEA annual meeting brings in new board member, billing process
  • Summer heats up next week
  • Highway 133 closure this week
  • Colorado proposed changes to voting rules
  • Spruce beetle plan gets extention for public comment
  • Birth Control program receives another round of funding

State lawmakers are officially at the halfway point of the 2015 legislative session. What needs to be done before the end of the session? Lawmakers will need to pass a balanced budget, and along the way grapple with some hot-button issues such as school testing requirements and police reforms.

"Most of the big work is ahead of us, what happens for the first half is kind of getting ready for it," said Senate President Bill Cadman (R-Colorado Springs).

A popular contraception program in Colorado is receiving criticism from conservative lawmakers who say that the program's use of intrauterine devices, or IUDs, qualify as abortions.

More than 30,000 women in Colorado have gotten a device because of the state program, the Colorado Family Planning Initiative. An IUD normally costs between $500 and several thousand dollars. Through the program women could receive one for free.

A bill attempting to reduce teen pregnancies and provide state funding for intrauterine devices has passed its first test at the capitol. House Bill 1194 would provide $5 million for clinics across the state that offer long-term reversible contraceptives to low-income women and teenagers. Colorado has been running the program with a private grant, which will run out at the end of June 2015.

"Our teen birth rate has dropped 40 percent over the last four years and 34 percent drop in abortions," said Larry Wolk, the executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment.

When Wendy Sue Swanson started out as a pediatrician eight years ago, it never crossed her mind to bring up the option of intrauterine devices — an insertable form of long-acting contraception — when she had her regular birth-control discussions with teenage patients who were sexually active.

"The patch had been the thing," she said, referring to a small, Band-Aid-like plastic patch that transmits hormones through the skin to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

Pregnancy Test
flickr/isnow

A Colorado bill aimed at preventing teen pregnancy and keeping kids in school will be heard by the House Appropriations Committee Friday morning. 

HB1079 seeks to extend and expand a pilot program known as the teen pregnancy and dropout prevention program. Republican Rep. Don Coram of Montrose co-sponsored the legislation. 

Coram says the pilot program has been running for over a decade in Mesa, Montrose and Delta counties.

KVNF Regional Newscast: Monday, Feb. 2, 2015

Feb 2, 2015

  Newscast

  • San Miguel Sheriff requests detox facility in new medical center
  • Changes to big game hunting rules
  • 13-year-old dies in Mesa County ATV accident
  • Colorado bill would fund successful birth control program
  • Data released over marijuana DUI arrests
  • Oil and gas task force  meets today
  • Colorado National Monument superintendent to move to park in Utah

Colorado Bill Would Continue Birth Control Program

Jan 30, 2015
IUD, birth control
flickr/stickypearls

A bill to fund a state program that's been credited with reducing teen pregnancies and abortions in Colorado was introduced to the House Friday.  

The measure would allocate $5 million from this year’s state budget to pay for the Colorado Family Planning Initiative. It’s a program that helps low-income women access long-acting birth control at certain health clinics. 

Last week, 13 women died in India after undergoing sterilization procedures in the central Indian state of Chhattisgarh, possibly because of tainted pills administered after the surgery. This tragedy has cast a negative light on sterilization.

In the 1950s, four people — the founder of the birth control movement, a controversial scientist, a Catholic obstetrician and a wealthy feminist — got together to create a revolutionary little pill the world had never seen before.

They were sneaky about what they were doing — skirting the law, lying to women about the tests they performed and fibbing to the public about their motivations.

A string of Republican candidates for Senate are supporting an issue usually associated with Democrats: easier access to contraception.