Climate Change

ENVIRONMENT
9:36 am
Thu December 11, 2014

Hickenlooper Shows Off Colorado Water Plan Draft

Bente Birkeland RMCR

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 4:53 pm

Governor John Hickenlooper unveiled a draft of the state's first ever water plan Wednesday. The goal of the plan - a decade in the making - is to create a comprehensive water strategy to protect rural farm economies and bring more water to millions of people along the Front Range.

"Water is too important for bickering and potential failure. It demands collaborations," said James Eklund, Director of the Colorado Water Conservation Board, which drafted the proposal. "This plan sets the stage for us to take the necessary next steps."

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NEWS
1:55 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Despite Pledge, Emissions Continue To Rise

Current emissions in tons and the target for 2020.
Credit EcoAction Partners

Four years ago, Telluride, Mountain Village, and San Miguel County all looked at their greenhouse gas emissions and set the goal of reducing them by 20 percent by the year 2020. 

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ENVIRONMENT
8:01 am
Fri November 14, 2014

With Drought The New Normal, Calif. Farmers Find They Have To Change

California sheep rancher Dan Macon had to sell almost half of his herd because the drought left him without enough feed.
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:37 am

Ask Northern California sheep rancher Dan Macon what this drought is doing to his pocketbook and he'll break it down for you real quick.

"It's like if you woke up one morning and lost 40 percent of the equity in your house," he says. "Our primary investment in our ranch is in these sheep and we just sold 40 percent of our stock."

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ENVIRONMENT
3:54 pm
Thu November 13, 2014

Climate Change Deal Requires U.S., China To Overhaul Energy Use

Originally published on Thu November 13, 2014 5:54 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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ENVIRONMENT
9:44 am
Sun October 19, 2014

As Their Wells Run Dry, California Residents Blame Thirsty Farms

Many rural California residents rely on private wells for tap water — wells that are starting to dry up.
Jeremy Raff KQED

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Imagine flushing the toilet and watching sand come up. That's what happened to Pam Vieira, who lives south of Modesto, Calif. Her water well has slowed to a trickle, and you can see the sand in the tank of her toilet.

"Sometimes we have brown water," Vieira says. "Sometimes we have no water."

Vieira is one of as many as 2 million rural California residents who rely on private domestic wells for drinking water.

Some of those people are among the hardest hit by the state's severe drought, as wells across the state's Central Valley farm belt start to go dry.

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POLITICS
9:02 am
Thu October 16, 2014

When Is It OK For Scientists To Become Political?

David Jones iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 4:32 pm

It's not everyday that a world famous climate scientist gets himself arrested in front of the White House. But that's exactly what happened to James Hansen in 2011 as part of a protest against the Keystone Pipeline.

In the 1980s it was Hansen's highly respected work that helped people realize that the climate change we humans were driving was real — and really dangerous.

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ENVIRONMENT
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

When Can A Big Storm Or Drought Be Blamed On Climate Change?

Melbourne visitors and residents took to the waters of Australia's St. Kilda Beach in January 2013 to escape a fierce heat wave.
Scott Barbour Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 6:52 pm

Nowadays, when there's a killer heat wave or serious drought somewhere, people wonder: Is this climate change at work? It's a question scientists have struggled with for years. And now there's a new field of research that's providing some answers. It's called "attribution science" — a set of principles that allow scientists to determine when it's a change in climate that's altering weather events ... and when it isn't.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:33 am
Tue September 9, 2014

More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn.
Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:33 am

People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their Major League Baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced to nest well north of the Mid-Atlantic state.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:53 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

Joe Giersch, an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, studies stoneflies that live only in the melt from glaciers and snowpack in the northern Rockies.
Clint Muhlfeld USGS

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

The northern arm of the Rocky Mountains is sometimes called "the crown of the continent," and its jewels are glaciers and snowfields that irrigate large parts of North America during spring thaw.

But the region is getting warmer, even faster than the rest of the world. Scientists now say warming is scrambling the complex relationship between water and nature and could threaten some species with extinction as well as bring hardship to ranchers and farmers already suffering from prolonged drought.

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ENVIRONMENT
4:10 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

Pika Populations Doing Well In Colorado High Country, Wildlife Officials Say

Colorado Parks and Wildlife research shows pika populations are doing well in mountainous areas in the state.
Credit Sally King / National Parks Service

The American pika is closely related to a rabbit. They are about the size of a guinea pig and are found throughout Colorado's high country and other Western States in mountainous areas.

In the early 2000's pika were being considered for the endangered species list because they are susceptible to climate change, according to wildlife officials. 

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POLITICS
5:03 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

KVNF Candidate Interview: Mark Udall

U.S. Sen. Mark Udall at a voter meet-and-greet in Montrose.
Credit Laura Palmisano

Editor's Note: This story aired in July and was rebroadcast in October. 

U.S. Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., campaigned in Montrose at a voter meet-and-greet Tuesday. 

Udall faces Republican challenger Cory Gardner in a hotly contested race that could decide which party controls the Senate. 

KVNF's Laura Palmisano was at the event and brings us this candidate interview. 


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NEWS
5:18 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

Feds: Climate Change Already Affecting Colorado

Mt. Lamborn, Paonia, CO
Credit Laura Palmisano

 A report released Tuesday by the Obama Administration found climate change has already caused extensive changes across the United States including here in Colorado. 

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NEWS
8:15 am
Thu April 17, 2014

KVNF Regional News: Thursday, April 17, 2014

  Newcast

  • Rural Coloradans may be able to testify on bills remotely
  • Some NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS could receive in-state tuition in Colorado
  • Seed shortage stymies hemp growers
  • Climate change affecting broad-tailed humming birds
NEWS
8:20 am
Fri March 7, 2014

KVNF Regional News: Friday, March 7, 2014

Newscast

  • Search continues for snowmobiler in Montezuma County

  • Ouray Voters Will decide three marijuana questions

  • Background information surfaces on accused murders William & Nancy Styler  

  • Climate Change Could Benefit Some Invasive Plants  

​

NEWS
9:47 am
Thu December 5, 2013

KVNF Regional Newscast: Thursday, December 5, 2013

Headlines

  • Citizen Scientists Studying Air Pollution in the Valley
  • Finalized North Fork Alternative Plan Submitted to BLM
  • Colder-than-Usual Temps Could Last into Next Week
  • Extreme Dust, Global Warming could lead to Earlier Spring Thaw
  • Sounds of the High Country - Allen Best on Industrial Hemp in CO
NEWS
10:36 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Climate Change Measured on Open Spaces near Aspen

Scientists hike snowy trails to reach one of two soil moisture towers located on Pitkin County Open Space properties.
Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio

In the future, the forests surrounding Aspen will look different. Already, mountain shrubs are replacing some Aspen stands and changing the complexion of the area, likely due to due a warming climate.

Neighboring Pitkin County is now tracking these shifts on open space properties.  Two local non-profit organizations are helping. The new data is thanks to a pair of towers that’s tracking things like soil moisture and temperature.

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iSeeChange
9:25 am
Wed September 18, 2013

iSeeChange: Signs of Floods to Come?

Flooding along Boulder Creek in Boulder, CO
Credit JGColorado via Flickr (CC BY-NC)

In the wake of the historic Front Range Floods, many climate experts and researchers admit that while they’ve known of the potential for dangerous flooding in the Boulder area for some time now, hardly anybody could’ve predicted such a large-scale disaster.

We decided to look into what the floods might tell us about the future of massive storms, and whether the events of last week might change our definitions of "rare" weather events.

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iSeeChange
9:33 am
Tue August 6, 2013

iSeeChange: Fall in August?

Yellowing Aspen trees along Kebler Pass
Credit Patty Kaech-Feder

Though we’re barely a week into August, some signs of fall have started to appear in western Colorado.

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iSeeChange
9:37 am
Mon July 1, 2013

iSeeChange: Do Warmer Temps Equal Earlier Sunflowers?

Credit "P Kaech" via thealmanac.org

Last week, users on the Almanac reported seeing the summer's first sunflowers. One user was surprised to see the flowers were blooming already. 

University of Maryland Biology Professor David Inouye says the early blooming season probably has to do with the warmer weather as of late. Inouye spends his summers studying flowers at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory near Crested Butte. His current project involves looking at how the timing of flowering and abundance of flowering at changing. 

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iSeeChange
8:15 am
Mon June 24, 2013

iSeeChange: The Rising Threat of Wildfires

East Fork Fire, June 2013.
Credit USDA Forest Service

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, May 2013 was the third-warmest May on record for the planet, and the earth's temperature has been above its 20th century average for 339 straight months - more than 28 years. 

Hugh Carson has been fighting fires for more than 40 years, and although he’s retired now, he was in the thick of things last year when he coordinated aircraft to battle the High Park Fire near Fort Collins. Over the years, he’s seen some changes.

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