Colorado Watershed

Joshua M via Flickr (CC-BY)

It takes water to produce electricity, but how much water varies a lot depending on the fuel source and the power generating technology.

In Colorado, around half a percent of our total water usage is used to generate electricity.

It’s a small percentage, says Stacy Tellinghusen, water policy analyst for Western Resource Advocates, a non-profit conservation group, but adds that it’s not inconsequential. 

Headlines

  • Avalanche Near Vail Kills One, Injures Three
  • Snowpack Levels Off to Better Start than Last Year
  • New Medical Marijuana Licenses on hold in Pitkin County
  • Oil & Gas Groups Say New Rules will be costly
  • Telluride Foundation Awards Millions in Grants
Jeri Mattics Omernik/Valley Food Partnership

The 2nd Annual Western Slope Colorado Food & Farm Forum is coming up on Saturday, January 11th at the Montrose Pavilion. The conference brings together farmers, ranchers and others in the ag industry for conversations about sustainability, food production and marketing. 

For some details about the conference and this year's main theme of "Making Every Drop Count," we spoke to Carol Parker, President of the Valley Food Partnership based in Montrose.

On September 15th, KVNF presented a statewide call-in show on the Colorado River, looking at water issues and the future of the Colorado River. 

The program is a part of the year-long collaborative reporting series Connecting the Drops, and is hosted by KDNK in Carbondale, KRCC in Colorado Springs and KGNU in Boulder. 

Guests on the program include Taylor Hawes, a Nature Conservancy program director (who testified before a Senate committee on the Colorado River), Jim Pokrandt with the Colorado River District, and a representative from Colorado Springs Utility.

Maeve Conran

A complex series of agreements govern the distribution of water throughout the state.  Along the Colorado River, farms, cities & towns, and the recreation industry are all big players.  But everyone takes a backseat to a tiny hydroelectric plant that’s over one hundred years old.  It’s the Shoshone Generating Station, and it plays a critical role on the Upper Colorado.

Headlines

  • US Forest Service Unveils Plan for Forest Recovery
  • More Snow Possible for Western Colorado
  • Connecting the Drops - Hydropower on the Colorado River
  • Coloradans Enrolling in New Health Exchange in Higher Numbers
Hugh Carson

A winter storm has hit western Colorado, with the National Weather Service saying several feet of snow are possible in some areas of the central mountains.

On Sunday, September 15, KVNF will broadcast a live statewide call-in show focusing on the Colorado River. 

Wolfgang Staudt via Flickr (CC BY)

In May, as the drought lingered for yet another year, Governor John Hickenlooper issued an executive order to the Colorado Water Conservation Board, calling for a new Colorado Water Plan “that will support agriculture in rural Colorado and align state policy to the state’s water values.” Hickenlooper also paid tribute to Colorado’s historic water law, which claims first in time, first in right.

Tee Poole via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA)

In late July, a massive dust storm in the Saharan Desert of Africa moved across the Atlantic, making for an interesting start to the hurricane season, or you could say a boring one.

  • Grand Valley Water Officials Say State Should Import Water to Meet Demand
  • Delta County Commissioners Discuss Efforts to Protect Sage Grouse
  • Mountain Village's Green Gondola Project to Install 10 New Solar Panels
  • More Colorado Marijuana on Black Market Than Ever Before
  • Prison Dairy Serves Up Buffalo Milk
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

The future of agriculture across the Great Plains hinges on water. Without it, nothing can grow.

Climate models and population growth paint a pretty bleak picture for water availability a few decades from now. If farmers want to stay in business, they have to figure out how to do more with less. Enter: super efficient irrigation systems.

Maeve Conran

All around Colorado new collaborations are emerging around water storage and water use.  Partnerships with reservoirs are turning out to be key in terms of environmental stewardship, river protection, and healthy communities that rely on water.  As part of the year long series Connecting the Drops, KGNUs Maeve Conran looks at some of these collaborations that have produced tangible results.

jessstryker.com

The consensus on iSeeChange last week was…it’s hot! Too hot for this time of year. Too hot and too dry. If climate change experts are right, this will only get worse. KVNF’s Marty Durlin spoke to Dave Kanzer, senior water resources engineer for the Colorado River Conservation District, about the effects of a hotter, dryer world.

 

The biggest part of Dave Kanzer’s job is to help us conserve water – a job that only gets bigger as the drying effects of climate change are felt across the Colorado River basin.