DACA

  • Committee says Colorado failing to reach higher education goals
  • 5 town employees threaten to sue Paonia Board of Trustees
  • Alleged misconduct by a Paonia Trustee prompts angry letter
  • Agencies ramp up effort to bring broadband to rural areas
  • Colorado joins 15 states in lawsuit against President Trump over DACA

  • Trump cuts EPA budget by 40 percent, Colorado air and water quality will suffer
  • Bureau of Reclamation plans work project at Paonia Dam and Reservoir
  • Maintenance at Paonia Dam to last into November
  • Colorado officials react to Trump sending DACA to Congress
  • Montrose arterial project about halfway done

  • Conundrum Hot Springs overuse causes conundrum for land managers
  • Xcel Energy's proposed Colorado Energy Plan receiving tentative support
  • Capitol Coverage of President Trump's plan to get rid of DACA
  • Local prep football teams kickoff the new season

  • Delta resident petitioning to put recreational marijuana on April ballot
  • Cedaredge fugitive still on the loose
  • Denver City Council fights Trump's anti immigration orders
  • Secretary of State Williams warns of scams against Texas relief charities
  • House leader Nancy Pelosi visits Denver
  • Carbondale experiencing worst bear season in years

The executive actions that President Obama announced Thursday are wide-reaching and complicated. Even the top-line numbers — such as how many people will be affected — are tough to pin down, because they are based on estimates of a population that Obama himself has said is living the shadows.

Mexico is helping some of its citizens apply for a controversial immigration program in the U.S. called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Since the Obama administration created the program in 2012, more than 580,000 unauthorized immigrants brought to the U.S. as minors have received temporary relief from deportation and been given work permits that last for at least two years.