KVNF Regional Newscast: Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Apr 13, 2016

  • Bill to allow medical marijuana in schools clears state House committee
  • Bill seeks to fund emergency cleanup at legacy mining sites in Colorado
  • Conservation groups oppose Congressman Tipton’s Thompson Divide lease swap
  • USGS releases report on human-induced earthquakes
  • Law enforcement across Colorado participate in spring DUI enforcement campaign 

Some parts of Oklahoma and Texas now have about the same risk of an earthquake as parts of California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The big difference is, the quakes in Oklahoma and Texas are "induced" — they're caused by oil and gas operations that pump wastewater down into underground wells.

Updated at 8:55 a.m. ET

More than 5,000 people are confirmed dead from Saturday's earthquake just outside Kathmandu, Nepal. Nearly 11,000 more were injured, according to Nepal's National Emergency Operation Center.

From Kathmandu, NPR's Kirk Siegler reports that strong tremors are continuing:

Out on Oklahoma's flat prairie, Medford, population about 900, is the kind of place where people give directions from the four-way stop in the middle of town.

It seems pretty sedate, but it's not. "We are shaking all the time," says Dea Mandevill, the city manager. "All the time."

The afternoon I stopped by, Mandevill says two quakes had already rumbled through Medford.

"Light day," she laughs. But, she adds, "the day's not over yet; we still have several more hours."

Mandevill may be laughing it off, but Austin Holland, the state seismologist, isn't.

A few weeks ago, we reported on a US Geological Survey study that looked at the connection between the injection of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, and earthquakes in the Raton Basin in southern Colorado. 


  • Recent earthquake caused by brine injections in Paradox Valley
  • CHC sends letter to BLM, requests decision on North Fork Leasing
  • Civil Unions bill certain to pass with new bipartisan support
  • Oil and Gas commission defers judgment on new setback rules till Feb. 11
  • iSeeChange Almanac records unusually high rainfall for January


  • Paonia Mayor discusses BLM meeting at Town Hall
  • Immigrants who finish high school expected to get in-state tuition
  • Coal projected to become top energy provider by 2030
  • Elk Creek Mine in Somerset still closed
  • Minor earthquake felt on Western Slope
  • Snowmobile fatality near Overland Reservoir