ENVIRONMENT

ENVIRONMENT
4:11 pm
Thu November 13, 2014

Why The 'Invasivores' Haven't Pounced On Bear Meat

Slow-cooked New York bear meat has been described as like beef stew, but with "a little stronger texture and a little gamier flavor."
David Sommerstein North Country Public Radio

Originally published on Mon November 17, 2014 10:43 am

The fight against nuisance critters is increasingly being fought at the dinner table. We've reported on so-called invasivores eating everything from Asian carp (battered and fried!) to wild pigs (Russian boar carpaccio, anyone?) as a means of reducing pesky populations.

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ENVIRONMENT
3:54 pm
Thu November 13, 2014

Climate Change Deal Requires U.S., China To Overhaul Energy Use

Originally published on Thu November 13, 2014 5:54 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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ENVIRONMENT
10:11 am
Wed November 12, 2014

Wilderness "Hot Spots" See Increasing Crowds

National Forest officials are considering an update of a management plan for the Maroon Bells/Snowmass Wilderness. The outdated plan didn't account for the crowds the area saw this summer.

Originally published on Mon November 10, 2014 4:11 pm

The Forest Service is beginning the discussion about how to deal with increasing problems with crowds in the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. This summer saw huge numbers of visitors at popular spots like Crater Lake and the Four Pass Loop. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, forest service officials are working to educate the public before exploring solutions.

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ENVIRONMENT
3:22 pm
Sun November 9, 2014

Low Gas Prices Haven't Slowed Domestic Drilling — Yet

Lower oil prices, while good for the economy, are a threat to what has been a dramatic surge in oil production in the U.S.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 10, 2014 1:22 pm

It's lunchtime in Douglas, Wyo., a town smack in the middle of the state's booming oil patch, and the line of cars at the McDonald's drive-through wraps around the building. A hiring poster hangs in the window, and the parking lot is full.

Troy Hilbish, a tool hand for the oil field servicing company Schlumberger, says while he didn't know oil prices have been falling, he does know what falling prices mean.

"If the oil prices go up, we drill more," Hilbish says. "If they go down, we don't drill as much."

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ENVIRONMENT
5:48 pm
Thu November 6, 2014

Sinking Land, Earthquakes Linked To Waste Water Injection

A few weeks ago, we reported on a US Geological Survey study that looked at the connection between the injection of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, and earthquakes in the Raton Basin in southern Colorado. 

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ENVIRONMENT
3:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:44 pm

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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ENVIRONMENT
9:44 am
Sun October 19, 2014

As Their Wells Run Dry, California Residents Blame Thirsty Farms

Many rural California residents rely on private wells for tap water — wells that are starting to dry up.
Jeremy Raff KQED

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Imagine flushing the toilet and watching sand come up. That's what happened to Pam Vieira, who lives south of Modesto, Calif. Her water well has slowed to a trickle, and you can see the sand in the tank of her toilet.

"Sometimes we have brown water," Vieira says. "Sometimes we have no water."

Vieira is one of as many as 2 million rural California residents who rely on private domestic wells for drinking water.

Some of those people are among the hardest hit by the state's severe drought, as wells across the state's Central Valley farm belt start to go dry.

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ENVIRONMENT
2:25 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Colo. Parks & Wildlife Gets $10,000 Donation To Aide Poaching Investigation

An animal protection organization has donated $10,000 for information leading to convictions in two Roaring Fork poaching incidents. 

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ENVIRONMENT
7:27 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Predictions Of 'Peak Oil' Production Prove Slippery

Workers drill for oil in the Bakken shale formation outside Watford City, N.D., an area experiencing an oil boom.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 10:52 am

The dustiest portion of my home library includes the 1980s books — about how Japan's economy would dominate the world.

And then there are the 1990s books — about how the Y2K computer glitch would end the modern era.

Go up one more shelf for the late 2000s books — about oil "peaking." The authors claimed global oil production was reaching a peak and would soon decline, causing economic chaos.

The titles include Peak Oil and the Second Great Depression, Peak Oil Survival and When Oil Peaked.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:10 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

Oil & Gas Assoc. Drops Longmont Suit, City's Fracking Ban Still In Place

The Colorado Oil & Gas Association has dropped its lawsuit against the city of Longmont.

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ENVIRONMENT
3:09 am
Tue October 14, 2014

School Facilities Strained By Boom In Petroleum Engineering

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:00 am

Copyright 2014 KUNC-FM. To see more, visit http://kunc.org.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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ENVIRONMENT
11:48 am
Fri October 10, 2014

U.S. Energy Boom Spurs Massive Demand For New Pipelines

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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ENVIRONMENT
10:02 am
Wed October 8, 2014

The 'Blood Moon' Eclipse Was Quite A Show

The "blood moon" eclipse above the Washington Monument just before dawn on the National Mall, in Washington, D.C.
Andrew Harnik The Washington Times /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 1:45 pm

Here are some photos taken of the eclipse in the U.S., China and Nepal:

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ENVIRONMENT
9:13 am
Tue October 7, 2014

'Blood Moon' Eclipse To Be Visible Throughout U.S.

A "blood moon" captured on the night of Jan. 20, 2000.
Fred Espenak NASA

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 10:59 am

If you missed the total eclipse of the moon in April, you might have another chance: On Wednesday morning, the second of four lunar eclipses this year and next will occur.

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ENVIRONMENT
3:10 pm
Sat October 4, 2014

Photo Break: America Puts On Its Fall Colors

A striking image of autumn trees lining a drive in Vermont.
reinschreiber Instagram

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 7:03 pm

October brings the peak of the autumn foliage season in many U.S. states, drawing both tourists and camera lenses. Thanks to the NPR community, we've collected a few photos that are worth taking a break from the news to stare at.

The photos were taken in a variety of states — except, of course, those where the season hasn't begun to turn. If you're heading out to see the autumn views, the USDA has a map showing where the leaves are turning; in many states, local agencies can provide more tailored information.

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ENVIRONMENT
5:08 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Listed As Threatened Species

The American Bird Conservancy estimates there are 350 to 495 pairs of yellow-billed cuckoos in the U.S. The bird is also found in Mexico.
Credit U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A migratory bird found in the western United States has been given federal protection under the Endangered Species Act.   

The yellow-billed cuckoo population in 12 western states including Colorado has been listed as a threatened species.

Steve Segin with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says the designation was announced Thursday.

"One of the major threats to the yellow-billed cuckoo has been the loss of riverside habitat," Segin says. "It lives in these riparian areas and streams and rivers."

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ENVIRONMENT
12:12 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

Scientist Amory Lovins Talks Energy

Physicist and environmental scientist Amory Lovins has worked in the field of energy policy for over 40 years. He speaks with  KVNF's  Jake Ryan about the changing energy landscape around the world.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:59 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Soil Doctors Hit Pay Dirt In Manhattan's Central Park

The Bronx may be up and the Battery down, but Central Park is where an amazing wealth of different sorts of microbes play.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:14 am

Manhattan's Central Park is surrounded by one of the densest cities on the planet. It's green enough, yet hardly the first place most people would think of as biologically rich.

But a team of scientists got a big surprise when they recently started digging there.

They were 10 soil ecologists — aka dirt doctors. Kelly Ramirez from Colorado State University was among them. "We met on the steps of the natural history museum at 7 a.m. with our collection gear, coolers and sunblock," she recalls.

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ENVIRONMENT
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

When Can A Big Storm Or Drought Be Blamed On Climate Change?

Melbourne visitors and residents took to the waters of Australia's St. Kilda Beach in January 2013 to escape a fierce heat wave.
Scott Barbour Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 6:52 pm

Nowadays, when there's a killer heat wave or serious drought somewhere, people wonder: Is this climate change at work? It's a question scientists have struggled with for years. And now there's a new field of research that's providing some answers. It's called "attribution science" — a set of principles that allow scientists to determine when it's a change in climate that's altering weather events ... and when it isn't.

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ENVIRONMENT
4:18 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

Solar Advocates Fight Utilities Over Grid Access

Vera Cole is president of the Mid-Atlantic Renewable Energy Association, a group arguing against proposed rules in Pennsylvania that would put stricter limits on how much grid-connected solar power homeowners can produce on their property.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 11:46 am

The solar power business is growing quickly in the U.S. More than 500,000 homeowners and businesses installed solar panels in just the first half of this year, according to a Solar Energy Industries Association report.

When people get electricity from the sun, they don't buy it from their local power company. But that utility still must have the generators and power lines to provide electricity when the sun is not shining. That's creating conflicts across the country.

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