ENVIRONMENT

ENVIRONMENT
2:25 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Colo. Parks & Wildlife Gets $10,000 Donation To Aide Poaching Investigation

An animal protection organization has donated $10,000 for information leading to convictions in two Roaring Fork poaching incidents. 

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ENVIRONMENT
7:27 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Predictions Of 'Peak Oil' Production Prove Slippery

Workers drill for oil in the Bakken shale formation outside Watford City, N.D., an area experiencing an oil boom.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 10:52 am

The dustiest portion of my home library includes the 1980s books — about how Japan's economy would dominate the world.

And then there are the 1990s books — about how the Y2K computer glitch would end the modern era.

Go up one more shelf for the late 2000s books — about oil "peaking." The authors claimed global oil production was reaching a peak and would soon decline, causing economic chaos.

The titles include Peak Oil and the Second Great Depression, Peak Oil Survival and When Oil Peaked.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:10 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

Oil & Gas Assoc. Drops Longmont Suit, City's Fracking Ban Still In Place

The Colorado Oil & Gas Association has dropped its lawsuit against the city of Longmont.

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ENVIRONMENT
3:09 am
Tue October 14, 2014

School Facilities Strained By Boom In Petroleum Engineering

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:00 am

Copyright 2014 KUNC-FM. To see more, visit http://kunc.org.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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ENVIRONMENT
11:48 am
Fri October 10, 2014

U.S. Energy Boom Spurs Massive Demand For New Pipelines

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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ENVIRONMENT
10:02 am
Wed October 8, 2014

The 'Blood Moon' Eclipse Was Quite A Show

The "blood moon" eclipse above the Washington Monument just before dawn on the National Mall, in Washington, D.C.
Andrew Harnik The Washington Times /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 1:45 pm

Here are some photos taken of the eclipse in the U.S., China and Nepal:

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ENVIRONMENT
9:13 am
Tue October 7, 2014

'Blood Moon' Eclipse To Be Visible Throughout U.S.

A "blood moon" captured on the night of Jan. 20, 2000.
Fred Espenak NASA

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 10:59 am

If you missed the total eclipse of the moon in April, you might have another chance: On Wednesday morning, the second of four lunar eclipses this year and next will occur.

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ENVIRONMENT
3:10 pm
Sat October 4, 2014

Photo Break: America Puts On Its Fall Colors

A striking image of autumn trees lining a drive in Vermont.
reinschreiber Instagram

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 7:03 pm

October brings the peak of the autumn foliage season in many U.S. states, drawing both tourists and camera lenses. Thanks to the NPR community, we've collected a few photos that are worth taking a break from the news to stare at.

The photos were taken in a variety of states — except, of course, those where the season hasn't begun to turn. If you're heading out to see the autumn views, the USDA has a map showing where the leaves are turning; in many states, local agencies can provide more tailored information.

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ENVIRONMENT
5:08 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Listed As Threatened Species

The American Bird Conservancy estimates there are 350 to 495 pairs of yellow-billed cuckoos in the U.S. The bird is also found in Mexico.
Credit U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A migratory bird found in the western United States has been given federal protection under the Endangered Species Act.   

The yellow-billed cuckoo population in 12 western states including Colorado has been listed as a threatened species.

Steve Segin with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says the designation was announced Thursday.

"One of the major threats to the yellow-billed cuckoo has been the loss of riverside habitat," Segin says. "It lives in these riparian areas and streams and rivers."

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ENVIRONMENT
12:12 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

Scientist Amory Lovins Talks Energy

Physicist and environmental scientist Amory Lovins has worked in the field of energy policy for over 40 years. He speaks with  KVNF's  Jake Ryan about the changing energy landscape around the world.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:59 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Soil Doctors Hit Pay Dirt In Manhattan's Central Park

The Bronx may be up and the Battery down, but Central Park is where an amazing wealth of different sorts of microbes play.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:14 am

Manhattan's Central Park is surrounded by one of the densest cities on the planet. It's green enough, yet hardly the first place most people would think of as biologically rich.

But a team of scientists got a big surprise when they recently started digging there.

They were 10 soil ecologists — aka dirt doctors. Kelly Ramirez from Colorado State University was among them. "We met on the steps of the natural history museum at 7 a.m. with our collection gear, coolers and sunblock," she recalls.

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ENVIRONMENT
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

When Can A Big Storm Or Drought Be Blamed On Climate Change?

Melbourne visitors and residents took to the waters of Australia's St. Kilda Beach in January 2013 to escape a fierce heat wave.
Scott Barbour Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 6:52 pm

Nowadays, when there's a killer heat wave or serious drought somewhere, people wonder: Is this climate change at work? It's a question scientists have struggled with for years. And now there's a new field of research that's providing some answers. It's called "attribution science" — a set of principles that allow scientists to determine when it's a change in climate that's altering weather events ... and when it isn't.

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ENVIRONMENT
4:18 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

Solar Advocates Fight Utilities Over Grid Access

Vera Cole is president of the Mid-Atlantic Renewable Energy Association, a group arguing against proposed rules in Pennsylvania that would put stricter limits on how much grid-connected solar power homeowners can produce on their property.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 11:46 am

The solar power business is growing quickly in the U.S. More than 500,000 homeowners and businesses installed solar panels in just the first half of this year, according to a Solar Energy Industries Association report.

When people get electricity from the sun, they don't buy it from their local power company. But that utility still must have the generators and power lines to provide electricity when the sun is not shining. That's creating conflicts across the country.

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ENVIRONMENT
11:22 am
Wed September 24, 2014

Tracking Changes In Drinking Water

A water sample is taken from a property outside of Paonia.
Credit Jake Ryan

Last weekend, conservationists, students, and volunteers were spread out across the North Fork area, collecting water samples.  KVNF’s Jake Ryan found out why.

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ENVIRONMENT
9:33 am
Mon September 22, 2014

Largest Of Calif. Wildfires Destroys 10 Homes, Other Structures

Firefighters from the U.S. Forest Service clean up hot spots of the King fire in the El Dorado National Forest near Georgetown, Calif., late last week.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Mon September 22, 2014 12:11 pm

The so-called King Fire, one of several sweeping through parts of California, has destroyed 10 homes and 22 other buildings, fire officials say.

As of early Monday morning, crews had been able to contain about 18 percent of the fire, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire):

Sacramento's Capital Public Radio reports that more than 5,500 firefighters are battling the blaze.

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ENVIRONMENT
7:27 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Colorado Forests Die In Beetle's Wake

Spruce beetles have invaded the inner bark of this spruce tree in Hinsdale County, Colo.
Credit Laura Palmisano / KVNF

Over the past decade a tiny insect has been causing a big problem in southwest Colorado. And it’s getting worse. The beetle is devouring mature spruce forests and turning them into expanses primed for wildfire. The U.S. Forest Service recently unveiled a broad new plan to try to minimize fire danger but not everyone thinks it’s the best path forward. KVNF’s Laura Palmisano reports.

The Issue

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ENVIRONMENT
4:59 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Prescibed Burn Planned Wednesday On Uncompahgre Plateau

The Forest Service is planning a prescribed burn Wednesday on the Uncompahgre Plateau.

The agency plans to burn 147 acres on the northern end of 25 Mesa Road, also known as the Delta-Nucla road.

Lee Ann Goupe is a spokeswoman with the Forest Service.

"This is an area where an Environmental Assessment was done and this is part of those prescribed treatments designed to enhance wildlife habitat, reduce fuels and reintroduce fire into that ecosystem," Goupe says.

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ENVIRONMENT
2:32 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

U.S. Gets Middling Marks On 2014 'State Of Birds' Report Card

"The State of the Birds" 2014 report found that red knots (above) and other shorebirds are among the most threatened groups in the U.S. More than half of U.S. shorebird species are on the report's Watch List — species that are currently endangered or at risk.
Gerrit Vyn The Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 9:30 am

All is not well with the nation's birds. The most comprehensive study ever of birds in America is out today, and it says many populations are in steep decline, even as others are doing well.

The report, called "The State of the Birds," comes from the federal government, universities and conservation groups — 23 organizations that have spent years examining bird populations, as well as habitats where the various species live.

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ENVIRONMENT
1:01 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

After The Colorado Flood, Some Rebuild And Others Start Over

Sarah and Ed Egloff stand outside a garage on their new property.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Fri September 5, 2014 5:00 am

After waters washed over Boulder, Larimer and Weld counties during the September flood, many started to rebuild. Others haven't been able to go back.

The easiest way for Ed and Sarah Egloff to describe their lost home in the Big Thompson Canyon is to tell you what remained on the property afterward.

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ENVIRONMENT
9:53 am
Tue September 9, 2014

A Year Post-Flood, No Mandated Changes For Oil And Gas Operators

An oil and gas site near the St. Vrain Creek. Metal berms replace earthen ones.
Nathan Heffel KUNC

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:00 am

One of the more striking images during the September flood was of inundated oil and gas pads, washed out earthen berms and overturned storage tanks. In all, over 48,000 gallons of oil and condensate spilled.

While changes have been made in the industry to prepare for another flood, so far, they’re strictly voluntary.

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