Food

Substitute host Peggy Soup is joined by Tim Owens, for a chat about food! Tim is a former restaurateur. John from Montrose & Clark from Paonia call in with questions & comments.

Host Jill Spears & gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen discuss end-of-season garden issues & take a few calls.

It's often a split-second decision. You're in the produce aisle, and those organic apples on display look nice. You like the idea of organic — but they're a few bucks extra. Ditto for the organic milk and meat. Do you splurge? Or do you ask yourself: What am I really getting from organic? Scientists have been trying to answer this question. And the results of a huge new meta-analysis published this week in the British Journal of Nutrition adds to the evidence that organic...

Gardening guru Lance Swigart is taking some time off from the show, so this episode feature the "Lady Worms," gardener Lulu Volckhausen & host Jill Spears.

Suze Smith

Late-season gardening tips from garden gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen, hosted by Jill Spears

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, Nov. 13, 2015

Nov 13, 2015

GJPD: Officers struck by reckless driver Suspicious device at Telluride gas station deemed safe CSU study finds no evidence of dangerous oil, gas contaminants in water Can small communities tackle global food security?

The World Health Organization made an announcement Monday that's likely to come as a blow to anyone whose favorite outdoor snack is a hot dog. Processed meats — yes, hot dogs, plus sausage, ham, even turkey bacon — are cancer-causing, a committee of scientists with WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded . And it classified red meat as "probably carcinogenic to humans." The IARC posted a Q&A on its site, but it didn't cover all of the questions we've been hearing from you...

More and more schools are trying to serve meals with food that was grown nearby. The U.S. Department of Agriculture just released some statistics documenting the trend. According to this "census" of farm-to-school programs, at least 42,000 schools spent almost $600 million on local food during the 2013-2014 school year. That's up almost 50 percent from the previous census, conducted two years earlier. (Both "censuses" were actually a questionnaire that the USDA sent to schools.) The schools...

After rejecting a number of earlier offers, British-based beer company SABMiller accepted in principle a 69 billion British pound ($106 billion) offer from Budweiser brewer Anheuser Busch InBev. If Tuesday's agreement is finalized, the new beer company will be the largest in the world and control two top U.S. brands in Budweiser and Miller Genuine Draft, according to The Associated Press. SABMiller rejected at least four other offers before provisionally accepting the offer that values...

Whole Foods Market has announced that by April of next year it will stop sourcing foods that are produced using prison labor. The move comes on the heels of a demonstration in Houston where the company was chastised for employing inmates through prison-work programs. Michael Allen, founder of End Mass Incarceration Houston , organized the protest. He says Whole Foods was engaging in exploitation since inmates are typically paid very low wages. "People are incarcerated and then forced to work...

KVNF Regional Newscast: Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015

Sep 17, 2015

Two shootings in Mesa County Sharing Ministries Food Bank in Montrose raises over $1 million for new facility Telluride considers tiny homes to address housing shortage Slaughterhouses remain resilient to automation

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Harvest time! This episode is all about the end result of a season's work - harvesting the fruits of our labors! Lance reveals his tips for picking melons at exactly the right time. Lulu relates how her squash & pumpkin vines are completely taking over her yard. We also get tips for how to safely trap & release a pesky skunk!

Feeding a caffeine habit is no sweat in our day and age: Just raid the office kitchen for some tea or hit one of the coffee shops that pepper the landscape. But 1,000 years ago, Native Americans in the American Southwest and Mexican Northwest were getting their buzz on in landscapes where no obvious sources of caffeine grew, according to new findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The research shows that people in the arid region — who had no nearby sources...

If you want to hang out with a bunch of bees, you'd better be prepared for a little pain. Mario Padilla, a honeybee researcher at Penn State University, can usually tell when his hives are getting agitated. But he's already been stung three times today. And he's about to get it again. "I got stung!" Padilla says, half-laughing. "And that was a sting that was not even an invited sting. That was an I-was-minding-my-own-business sting." Padilla is raising these honeybees for researchers like...

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen chat about current conditions in the garden & take calls from Redlands Mesa, Montrose & even Monticello, Utah.

Food companies the world over are paying close attention to the groundswell of support for food transparency, the "know where your food comes from" movement. JBS, the largest meat producer in the world, is beginning to take notice as well. But executives with JBS USA , the North American arm of its Brazilian parent company, at the same time acknowledge that the very nature of their business is grisly, gory and sometimes unpalatable. "Part of you says, 'I need to learn how to bring the packing...

Della Curry gave a free lunch to a hungry child that may be costly. Curry is the kitchen manager — the lunch lady — at the Dakota Valley Elementary School in Aurora, Colo. She set off a national debate this week when she said that last Friday, "I had a first-grader in front of me, crying, because she doesn't have enough money for lunch," Curry told Denver's KCNC TV . "Yes, I gave her a lunch." And shortly thereafter, Curry was fired. She told the Denver Post that over the last school year,...

District 51 Buys Food Truck To Feed Needy Students

May 5, 2015
food truck
District 51

In Mesa County, 42 percent of children qualify for free or reduced lunch. During the summer, many of these same kids qualify for a meal program when school is out. Usually Mesa Valley School District 51 offers this program at four or five schools, but this year there’s only enough funding to have it at two. However, this summer the district plans on bringing meals to some students. With the help of a $50,000 grant from the Western Colorado Community Foundation it purchased a food truck from...

Tyson Foods, the country's biggest poultry producer, is promising to stop feeding its chickens any antibiotics that are used in human medicine. It's the most dramatic sign so far of a major shift by the poultry industry. The speed with which chicken producers have turned away from antibiotics, in fact, has surprised some of the industry's longtime critics. For decades, the farmers who raise chickens, pigs and cattle have used antibiotics as part of a formula for growing more animals, and...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvvvPTksIJ4 This piece comes from the Center for Public Integrity , a nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organization. Companies have added thousands of ingredients to foods with little to no government oversight. That's thanks to a loophole in a decades-old law that allows them to deem an additive to be "generally recognized as safe" — or GRAS — without the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's blessing, or even...

Pesticide-free? Nurtured with organic fertilizer? No antibiotics? Ask any shopper, and you're bound to find mixed answers for what an organic label means. Now, an association is trying to draw funding from something called a "checkoff" to pay for consumer advertising and research. For a checkoff to work, each farmer pays a small amount. For example, a penny-per-bushel of wheat or a dollar per cow would generate millions of dollars in pooled funding that could pay for splashy ad campaigns....

It's not the salt shakers on our tables that explain why Americans consume way too much sodium . It's the processed foods we buy in grocery stores. A new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 70 percent of the pizzas, pastas and meat dishes (think frozen entrees) we purchase in chain grocery stores exceed the Food and Drug Administration's "healthy" labeling standards for salt. Americans also get a lot of sodium from soups, cold cuts and bread. So, who's...

Roast rack of lamb or a platter of smoked, glazed ham — which dish should be the centerpiece of the Easter table? Lamb is rich in religious symbolism: A sacrificial lamb was first served by Jewish people on Passover, and Christians often refer to Jesus as the lamb of God. But ham feeds more guests and makes tastier leftovers. Soon, we may not have to choose. Third-generation country-ham curemaster Sam Edwards , of Surry, Va., and shepherd Craig Rogers , owner of Virginia's Border Springs...

Remember that old movie trope , in which the mousy girl who never gets noticed takes off her eyeglasses and — voila! — suddenly, everyone can see she was beautiful all along? Well, a similar sort of scenario is starting to play out in the world of produce in the U.S. (minus the sexist subtext). Around the country, food service companies, grocers and entrepreneurs passionate about fighting food waste are rallying to buy up fruits and vegetables excluded from the produce aisle because of their...

For the past two years, at an undisclosed location in the Upper Midwest, a large commercial egg farm has been probed with every tool of modern science. Researchers have collected data on feed consumed, eggs produced, rates of chicken death and injury, levels of dust in the air, microbial contamination and dollars spent. Graduate students have been assigned to watch hours of video of the hens in an effort to rate the animals' well-being. It was all intended to give farmers — and, perhaps,...

American state fairs have gotten competitive about wowing fair-goers (and the media) with their ever more outrageous concessions. Among the immoderate new dishes of 2014? The cheeseburger stuffed with macaroni and cheese on a Krispy Kreme bun at the California State Fair, and the deep-fried breakfast on-a-stick at the Minnesota State Fair. Turns out, concoctions that seemingly aim to break caloric records are a central part of the rodeo food experience, too. At Rodeo Houston , one of the...

Monica Wiitanen, outdoor oven
Laura Palmisano / KVNF

Cottage food laws are on the books in almost every state. These statutes allow people to make food products in their home kitchens and sell their goods directly to consumers. In Colorado two bills would expand the state's three-year-old Cottage Foods Act. Monica Wiitanen is adding wood to her outdoor brick oven. She uses it to bake artisanal breads that she makes in her home kitchen. " Well there are just some many interesting kinds of breads," Wiitanen says. "And every week it’s a little bit...

For many years, if a public school district wanted to serve students apples or milk from local farmers, it could face all kinds of hurdles. Schools were locked into strict contracts with distributors, few of whom saw any reason to start bringing in local products. Those contracts also often precluded schools from working directly with local farmers. But buying local got easier with federal legislation in 2008, and then again in 2010, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture created the Farm to...

Many people will see the snow that's currently blanketing much of the Eastern seaboard of the U.S. as a nuisance coating sidewalks and roads. Others are celebrating it as an excuse to spend the day swooshing down a hill. As for me, I like to think of snow as food. Growing up in Missouri, I consumed as much snow ice cream as possible from November to March. Each time the winter sky let loose, I caught a bowl of fresh flakes. My grandmother mixed raw eggs, cream and sugar and poured it over top...

Colorado Cottage Foods Act Sees Possible Expansions

Mar 5, 2015
bread
flickr/chiotsrun

A bill to expand the Colorado Cottage Foods Act is scheduled to get its first hearing early next week. The act allows people to sell certain products made in an unlicensed home kitchen directly to consumers. House Bill 1102 seeks to broaden it. Republican Rep. Yeulin Willett of Grand Junction is one of the bill’s sponsors. "That bill expands [the act] to include a number of different foods, but the main driver is pickled goods," Willett says. Right now items like jams, spices, candies, whole...

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