Grand Junction

  • Paonia finishes renovations on water plant
  • Data shows some counties growing while neighbors see decline
  • New 911 dispatch center opens in Montrose
  • Federal agency to host public meeting in Grand Junction to hear about coal leasing
  • Rain barrel bill hits a snag at the state capitol  

  • Hickenlooper nominates Donna Lynne for Lt. Gov.
  • Grand Junction job fair for high school students seeking alternative path
  • New CMU program aims to help community college students earn bachelor’s degree
  • Arch Coal paid bonuses days before bankruptcy filing
  • County Commissioner primary ballot rundown: Mesa, Delta, Montrose
  • Study finds cost of elections dropped after Colorado made mail ballot switch  

  • Fatal car accident in Grand Junction
  • Colorado declared free from Vesicular Stomatitis
  • New state IDs features Western Slope mountain
  • Capitol Conversation looking at potential changes to party caucus system  

  • Montrose toddler’s death ruled a homicide
  • I­-70 closure to continue through weekend
  • Hotchkiss town council member resigns
  • Grand Junction mulls building a $62 million arena
  • State Forest Service unveils report on health of Colorado forests
  • Governor Hickenlooper pushes for more reservoir storage in the state  

  • West Elk Mine owner files for bankruptcy 
  • Economist discusses Arch’s outlook and bankruptcy
  • U.S. coal consumption in decline
  • Montrose dispatch center is delayed for months
  • Driver crashed into Grand Junction emergency room

  • Missing snowmobiler found after overnight search outside of Telluride
  • Ailing Grand Junction homeless shelter seeks help from city
  • More than 169000 Coloradans signed up for health coverage since Nov. 

The wastewater treatment plant in Grand Junction, Colo., takes in 8 million gallons of raw sewage — what's flushed down the toilet and sinks.

Processing this sewage produces a lot of methane, which the plant used to just burn off into the air.

The process was "not good for the environment and a waste of a wonderful resource," says Dan Tonello, manager of the Persigo Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Now, using more infrastructure, the facility refines the methane further to produce natural gas chemically identical to what's drilled from underground.

  • Roadwork on Highway 92 near Hotchkiss delayed until spring
  • Police recover guns stolen from Grand Junction museum
  • Census Bureau: North Dakota, Colorado fastest growing populations
  • A conversation with outgoing Colorado natural resource director Mike King

  • Suspect in custody after Telluride bomb threat
  • Hundreds of acres of ranchland preserved in Montrose County through grant
  • Cedaredge spends big on new water treatment plant
  • Montrose commits to rodeo arena
  • Grand Junction facility creates energy from waste

  • USA Pro Challenge draws financial support in Grand Junction
  • Mesa County woman gets 30 years in toddler’s death
  • State’s top health official requests funding for successful contraceptive program
  • Colorado joins global effort to combat AIDS
  • Region 10 expands small business consulting services

razorback sucker, fish
Laura Palmisano

Some native fish in the Colorado River and its tributaries are struggling to stay afloat.  Invasive species, dams and water diversions all complicate the recovery of endangered fish in those waterways.  One long-standing program ties together federal and state agencies with regional groups to help these cold-blooded creatures make a comeback.

  •  Three guns stolen from Grand Junction museum
  • BLM seeks comments on proposal to upgrade transmission line between Montrose, Dove Creek
  • Panel talks climate change for Western Slope farmers
  • Opposition to moving West Slope water east reiterated ahead of Water Plan finalization

bull moose
Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Grand Valley had an unusual visitor last week. Colorado Parks and Wildlife received calls about a moose in Grand Junction near Orchard Mesa. 

"As curious as that may sound it turned out to be true," said JT Romatzke, the area wildlife manager. "We did respond and did indeed find a young bull moose in the Grand Valley."

  • Rare sighting: moose in Grand Junction
  • State water board awards $5.5M for projects at Montrose meeting
  • Governor submits sage grouse conservation plan to feds
  • Organic agriculture in Colorado continues to grow
  • Governor releases Colorado climate change plan
  • Paonia homecoming parade features vintage car tour

  • 14­-year-­old killed while hunting on Grand Mesa
  • Syphilis cases becoming more common in Colorado
  • Montrose County ordered to pay more than $750K in discrimination suit
  • Conference in Grand Junction looks to diversify coal economy of Western Slope
  • Statewide hearings look at Colorado’s new water plan
  • Severance tax distributed to communities, cuts expected next year
  • ACT scores dip in Colorado

  • Five killed in plane crash in southwestern Colorado
  • Counterfeit money surfacing in Grand Junction
  • Connecting The Drops: Winter water for ducks

  • Delta County sees spike in whooping cough cases
  • Three running for Delta County School Board
  • Grand Junction hires Glenwood Springs firm to create strategic broadband plan
  • iSeeChange: Coyotes on the Western Slope
  • Colorado State Fair opens with strong attendance

  Newscast

  • Body found in Grand Junction culvert ID’ed
  • Two Mesa County men arrested after police discover large pot grow operations
  • San Miguel County gets $330K to boost regional broadband
  • Montrose County conducts emergency exercise at regional airport
  • Mine spill continues causing problems in southwest Colorado, downstream communities

  • Body found in Grand Junction
  • Norwood emergency medical service seeks tax payer help
  • San Miguel commissioners OK ballot question over their own term limits
  • Western Slope now home to a breast milk donation center
  • Olathe receives funds for Main Street improvement project
  • State Capitol building renovation wraps up
bus, sucap, rroad runner stage lines
SUCAP

This month, marks the one-year anniversary of a regional bus service that connects Durango to Grand Junction. 

The Southern Ute Community Action Programs started Road Runner Stage Lines after Greyhound stopped running the route several years ago. 

KVNF's Laura Palmisano spoke to Clayton Richter, the division director of SUCAP’s Road Runner Transportation, about the service. 


  Newscast

  • Fire Officials: WCCC Blaze Suspicious, Under Investigation
  • Two Ouray Officers Injured In Attack, Authorities Searching For Suspect
  • Former Olathe Police Chief Appears In Court
  • Woman Sentenced For Stealing Funds From Eagle County
  • Earned Income Tax Credit Triggered For Colorado Residents
  • iSeeChange: Cicadas In Of The West

  Newscast

  • Waldorf school close to becoming reality in Paonia
  • CDOT begins transit system from Denver to Glenwood Springs
  • Food Bank in Grand Junction begins looks for new home
  • Time capsule discovered in Lake City
  • Commissioners fight for grazing, roads in BLM area

  Newscast

  • Delta Commissioners Support Protecting Some North Fork Lands From Oil & Gas Development
  • City Of Montrose Could Create Its Own Regional Dispatch Center
  • Grand Junction Fire Marshal Wants Charges In July Fourth Brush Fire
  • Troop Reductions Spare Much of Fort Carson
  • Colorado Entrepreneur Works To Build A Better Bike Helmet

Newscast

  • Petition calls for term limits in San Miguel County
  • Recordings of private Grand Junction meeting nonexistent
  • Telluride Medical District buys plot of land for new hospital
  • Conservation Agreement Protects 780 Acres In Unaweep Canyon
  • Rep. Hamner talks with KVNF
  • Legislators talk about the importance of climate change laws
  • Koch Industries focusing on mass incarceration
medical, syringe, IV drug use, WESTCAP, needle exchange, syringe exchange
Laura Palmisano / KVNF

Needle exchange programs in Colorado are expanding.

The programs are designed to keep illegal drug users from sharing used needles and spreading deadly diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C. And, not too long ago they were illegal in this state. 

Five years ago, only one needle exchange operated in Colorado and it was illegal. 

Newscast

  • Delta County man diagnosed with infectious disease
  • Two dead, two missing in Colorado rivers over the weekend
  • Judge won’t dismiss case against Grand Junction over panhandling ordinance
  • Birth control program gets another year of funding despite lack of legislative support

  Newscast

  • Safety Tips For Rafting Colorado Waterways
  • City And County Leaders From Across Colorado Meet In Breckenridge
  • Mesa County Regional Workforce Center Changes Status
  • Grand Junction Joins National High­-Speed Internet Effort
  • Black Canyon Astronomy Festival Kicks Off

  Newscast

  • Gay conversion bill killed in Senate committee
  • Women’s only hunting class open for enrollment
  • Grand Junction election results
  • Colorado House debates Amtrak

  Newscast

  • Woman allegedly sets her home on fire
  • Tipton asks feds about small banks
  • Paonia sends notice about drinking water violations
  • Waldorf school initiative loses state appeal
  • Economic development bill progresses at state capitol
  • Police reform bills introduced at state capitol

Newscast

  • Tipton plans visit to the Western Slope
  • Oil and gas future discussed at forum as well as task force recommendations
  • Solar facility saves city of Grand Junction thousands
  • I­-70 construction to start up again
  • GOP religious liberty bills draw criticism, fail in state House
  • Artists capture North Fork in art installation

Editor's Note: KVNF's Regional Newscast for Wednesday, March 11, 2015 did not air due to technical difficulties. We apologize for any confusion. 

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