Grand Mesa

bull moose
Kent Miller / NPS

The moose population on the Grand Mesa is growing. The area is home to more than 400 of the large animals. This Saturday, July 25 is the sixth annual Grand Mesa Moose Day event. 

  Newscast

  • Mosquitoes Test Positive For West Nile In Mesa County
  • State Lawmakers Hold Water Meetings Across Colorado
  • Gunnison Man Sentenced For Damaging Federal Lands In Montrose
  • Event Celebrates Grand Mesa’s Moose Population

On this week's Local Motion, KVNF's Laura Palmisano takes us on a drive around Grand Mesa with geologist Andres Aslan. On the drive, Aslan talks about the geological history of the mesa and why it's landslide prone. He also discusses May's massive landslide on the edge of the Grand Mesa near Collbran that claimed the lives of three men.

Grand Mesa
Laura Palmisano

May’s massive landslide on the edge of the Grand Mesa near Collbran claimed the lives of three men. 

Geologists I spoke to said landslides in western Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region are a normal occurrence because the earth is dynamic and erosion is happening all around us. 

To get a better understanding of why experts told me the nature of the flat-topped mountain is to slide, I took a drive on Grand Mesa with a geologist. 

I met Andres Aslan, a Colorado Mesa University professor and geologist, at the visitor center on the mesa. 

U.S. Forest Service

The spruce beetle epidemic and aspen decline in the Grand Mesa, Umcompahgre, and Gunnison National Forests were discussed Tuesday at a public meeting in Montrose. 

Over 70 people attended the meeting, and learned from U.S. Forest Service officials the spruce beetle population is exponentially increasing within the three National Forests.