Grand Mesa

black bear
U.S. Forest Service

State wildlife officials have concluded that a bear didn’t attack and maul a hunter over the weekend on the Grand Mesa. 

On Saturday, a man in his late 60s reported he was attacked by a bear. He told Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials he was parked on his ATV near Powderhorn Ski Resort when a bear attacked him causing him to drive over a small cliff into rocks below. CPW says the episode left him  with extensive but non-life threatening injuries.  

  • State wildlife officials conclude hunter wasn't attacked by bear
  • Federal report questions credentials of pilots in Silverton area crash
  • Colorado governor weighs in on sage grouse decision and fracking
  • Western Slope arts & culture organizations receive state grants
bull moose
Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Grand Valley had an unusual visitor last week. Colorado Parks and Wildlife received calls about a moose in Grand Junction near Orchard Mesa. 

"As curious as that may sound it turned out to be true," said JT Romatzke, the area wildlife manager. "We did respond and did indeed find a young bull moose in the Grand Valley."

  • 14­-year-­old killed while hunting on Grand Mesa
  • Syphilis cases becoming more common in Colorado
  • Montrose County ordered to pay more than $750K in discrimination suit
  • Conference in Grand Junction looks to diversify coal economy of Western Slope
  • Statewide hearings look at Colorado’s new water plan
  • Severance tax distributed to communities, cuts expected next year
  • ACT scores dip in Colorado
bull moose
Kent Miller / NPS

The moose population on the Grand Mesa is growing. The area is home to more than 400 of the large animals. This Saturday, July 25 is the sixth annual Grand Mesa Moose Day event. 


  • Mosquitoes Test Positive For West Nile In Mesa County
  • State Lawmakers Hold Water Meetings Across Colorado
  • Gunnison Man Sentenced For Damaging Federal Lands In Montrose
  • Event Celebrates Grand Mesa’s Moose Population

On this week's Local Motion, KVNF's Laura Palmisano takes us on a drive around Grand Mesa with geologist Andres Aslan. On the drive, Aslan talks about the geological history of the mesa and why it's landslide prone. He also discusses May's massive landslide on the edge of the Grand Mesa near Collbran that claimed the lives of three men.

Grand Mesa
Laura Palmisano

May’s massive landslide on the edge of the Grand Mesa near Collbran claimed the lives of three men. 

Geologists I spoke to said landslides in western Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region are a normal occurrence because the earth is dynamic and erosion is happening all around us. 

To get a better understanding of why experts told me the nature of the flat-topped mountain is to slide, I took a drive on Grand Mesa with a geologist. 

I met Andres Aslan, a Colorado Mesa University professor and geologist, at the visitor center on the mesa. 

U.S. Forest Service

The spruce beetle epidemic and aspen decline in the Grand Mesa, Umcompahgre, and Gunnison National Forests were discussed Tuesday at a public meeting in Montrose. 

Over 70 people attended the meeting, and learned from U.S. Forest Service officials the spruce beetle population is exponentially increasing within the three National Forests.