iSeeChange

  • President of Western Colorado Latino Chamber of Commerce Steps Down to Fight Cancer
  • Mesa County DA's Office Denies "Prejudice" Claims by Accused Palisade Mother's Defense Attorneys
  • Prosecutors in Aurora Theater Shootings Try to Block Testimony on Colorado's Death Penalty
  • Public Hearings on Marijuana Laws Begin at State Capitol
  • Hotchkiss Bans All Commercial Marijuana Activity
  • Delta County Landfill Happy to See 125 Tons of Tires
  • iSeeChange - Local "Guru" Ryan Warwick on Mushrooms
  • KVNF Competes in First Annual 24-Hour
Flowercat via Flickr (CC-NC-SA)

The height of the fruit season is approaching here in western Colorado, so for this week’s iSeeChange report, we decided to zoom out a bit and look at how Colorado’s biggest fruit crop fits into the national scene.  

 

  • Six Garfield County Fisheries May See Instream Flow Protections
  • Study Finds Colorado Solar Installations are Cheapest in Nation
  • Colorado's First Biomass Power Palnt Nearly Complete
  • Committee Debates Feasibility of New Renewables Standard for Rural Providers
  • More Cases of West Nile Virus Confirmed in Delta County
  • iSeeChange - Apple Economics of Western Colorado
Patty Kaech-Feder

Though we’re barely a week into August, some signs of fall have started to appear in western Colorado.

Eli Nixon (CC BY-NC-SA)

Afternoon clouds and occasional rains have dotted the Western Slope in the past few weeks, but that doesn’t mean people aren’t still worried about their water.

Last week Matthew Harris posted on the Almanac that the water he gets from German Creek was called on by a senior rights holder for the first time in the eight years he’s lived in Paonia. His creek’s just one of many that snake across the North Fork Valley, but if it’s been that long since that senior rights holder felt like they needed more water, should other residents and farmers be concerned? 

Headlines:

  • Oil and Gas Industry, BLM Split Over Cost of New Fracking Rules
  • iSeeChange Report – Western Slope Water Shortages – Relief Soon?
  • 28-Year-Old Montrose Man to Compete in 2013 X Games
  • Colorado Craft Brewing Industry Continues to Grow
Marty Durlin, KVNF

On the Almanac last week, P Kaech reported seeing snow on the top of Mt. Baldy near Crested Butte, and Andrea Lecos noticed that monsoon rains have brought up mosquitoes and other insects. Humans may hate the bugs, but birds are feasting on them. 

Travis Bubenik, KVNF

If you've followed the weather for even the past few days, daily whether predications have been pretty, well, predictable: sunny in the morning, cloudy in the afternoon, a chance of rain as the day wears on and the sun starts to drop.

The Monsoon season has arrived in Colorado, the annual time when hot, high pressure in the atmosphere moves east across the Continental Divide and cool, moist air comes trailing in behind it. It's a reliable weather pattern, but exactly how reliable? 

Headlines:

  • Ouray County Officials Aim to Bring in New Tax Revenue
  • Delta County Property Values Fall Dramatically
  • Monsoon Rains Lead to Fire Restrictions in San Juan National Forest
  • iSeeChange Report – The Not-So-Simple Science of Monsoon Forecasting
Travis Bubenik, KVNF

For this week’s iSeeChange report, we explore concerns about ditch lining in the area, and whether these manmade environmental changes (much like the ditches themselves) may alter their surroundings.

Last week on the Almanac, Stewart Mesa resident noticed fewer numbers of wasps around her house. She says usually by this time of the summer, her front porch is practically overrun with wasps. But this year they seem to have disappeared. 

Fir0002/Flagstaffotos

Headlines:

  • Aurora Shooter James Holmes’ Parents Will Be Allowed to Watch Trial
  • Colorado Health Exchange Opens October First
  • Ouray City Councilor Gary Hansen Dies Succumbs to Cancer
  • Grand Junction Apartments Evacuated After Homemade Explosives Found
  • Pressure Is On for Colorado Republicans to Back Immigration Bill
  • iSeeChange Report: Ditch Lining and Wildlife
"P Kaech" via thealmanac.org

Last week, users on the Almanac reported seeing the summer's first sunflowers. One user was surprised to see the flowers were blooming already. 

University of Maryland Biology Professor David Inouye says the early blooming season probably has to do with the warmer weather as of late. Inouye spends his summers studying flowers at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory near Crested Butte. His current project involves looking at how the timing of flowering and abundance of flowering at changing. 

Headlines:

  • The Worst Hot and Dry in Decades
  • West Fork Fire Complex Grows to Over 96,000 acres
  • iSeeChange: Do Warmer Temperatures Equal Earlier Sunflowers?
  • Annual Fairview School Reunion Meets over the weekend at Pleasure Park
  • New Colorado Gun Regulations Take Affect

Headlines:

  • West Fork Fire Complex grows, danger
  • Veteran Fire Fighter talks about change in fire seasons
  • Western Slope Skies examines women in space
  • Possible new fracking technique eliminates sand
  • Search for Dylan Redwine continues

iSeeChange: The Rising Threat of Wildfires

Jun 24, 2013
USDA Forest Service

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, May 2013 was the third-warmest May on record for the planet, and the earth's temperature has been above its 20th century average for 339 straight months - more than 28 years. 

Hugh Carson has been fighting fires for more than 40 years, and although he’s retired now, he was in the thick of things last year when he coordinated aircraft to battle the High Park Fire near Fort Collins. Over the years, he’s seen some changes.

Headlines:

  • DMEA annual meeting: Marston loses to Lund, Prendergast wins
  • Fracking plus drought equals no water for farmers across western states
  • Telluride restricts water usage
  • Wildfire Update
  • iSeeChange: The Colorado River Conservation District’s Dave Kanzer talks about the effects of climate change on the Colorado River

Headlines:

  • Panel looking at fines for Parachute leak
  • Plane crash at Great Sand Dunes National Park
  • DOE again extends time for uranium-lease comments
  • DMEA ballots due; race hotly contested
  • iSeeChange: Dustbowl Daze
Marty Durlin

Nearly 500 species of birds make their way through Colorado or live here year-around – and chances are local birder and author Evelyn Horn knows them. In the second report of a two-part series, KVNF’s Marty Durlin talked to Horn about the general decline of birds in a world where human population and activity is on the rise.

 

 

I asked her what she could say about the state of birds, whether climate change is impacting them, and certainly human activity as Evy has talked about. How would she characterize their condition?

Marty Durlin

May 11 was Colorado’s Migratory Bird Day, celebrating the nearly 500 species that live in the state or pass through it. Local naturalist, birder and author Evelyn Horn has spent the past twenty years or so focused on birds. In 1989 she and her husband Al moved from Las Vegas to Eckert and settled near Hart’s Basin, or Fruitgrowers Reservoir, which is controlled by the Orchard City Irrigation District (OCID). People had just been banned from the reservoir because of e-coli, and the absence of human activity made it more attractive to birds.

KVNF's beloved Julia Kumari Drapkin has produced a feature for the popular radio program, This American Life, which can be downloaded and podcasted started Sunday, 5/19/2013 at 6pm. 

Headlines:

  • Environment Foundation gives $50,000 to protect Thompson Divide from drilling
  • Parks & Wildlife increasing bear hunting licenses in response to dangerously high numbers of black bears in the state
  • Delta Historical Society offers tribute to two unique sisters
  • Feds, Utah agree on health plan
  • iSeeChange: history unfolds with the story of twin orchardists in the North Fork

Headlines:

  • Parachute Creek hydrocarbon leak containment efforts continue
  • Avalanche Center report on Loveland slide suggests human error
  • iSeeChange: What IS a normal spring?
Amber Kleinman

Paonia resident Amber Kleinman has been reading through the daily journals of William Beezley, an orchardist and farmer who lived up Steven’s Gulch in the first half of the 20th century. Recording selected entries for thealmanac.org and comparing them to current weather and conditions, Kleinman – a small-acreage farmer who keeps a journal herself -- has gained a new perspective.

The iSeeChange project and its website, thealmanac.org, are now featured in a beautiful new metasite produced by AIR, the Association of Independents in Radio. Our very own Julia Kumari Drapkin (we'll always call her "ours") will be presenting the iSeeChange project she developed in the North Fork Valley to various media interest groups across the country in the weeks to come.

Don Foster

About a month ago on thealmanac.org, Don posted a photo of a fellow with a big semi-load of bales – but they weren’t hay, they were cornstalks. The use of forage other than the traditional alfalfa and other grasses is becoming a necessity for some ranchers. 

Drought has made it more common now, but Judd Rodman has been harvesting cornstalks for cattle feed as far back as 1990. Based south of Paonia, he employs five people who help him harvest, bale and deliver cornstalk all over the Western Slope.

Headlines:

  • State Budget Clears House With 9 Republican Votes
  • Governor At Center Of Oil And Gas Battles (click on Read more for a list of pending legislation)
  • Reporters Discuss the Aftermath of Gun Legislation
  • iSeeChange: Cornstalk Bales Off an Alternative for Ranchers

2012 was a bad year for West Nile Virus in Western Colorado. Mesa, Montrose and Delta Counties accounted for nearly half the confirmed cases in the state. In Delta County, the 22 cases included the death of an 82-year-old man from Orchard City.

Marty Durlin

Thealmanac.org is bursting with news about new baby animals – spring brings calves,  lambs and kids.  KVNF's Marty Durlin reported on one of the almanac.org stories about Emily Hartnett, who lives on Garvin Mesa with her chickens, goats and cats. It’s a rustic life that begins by dawn and ends late in the day. On Friday one of her six adult goats, Alba, gave birth to two male kids. Instead of the soft, protected place Emily had prepared for her, Alba chose to deliver next to an old tractor embedded in the dirt in the middle of the goat yard.

Headlines:

  • Capitol Conversation: What's Happened; What's Ahead
  • Natural Gas Liquid Leaking North of Parachute
  • iSeeChange
  • New Kids On The Block

Headlines:

  • Most Colorado Gun Deaths Are Suicides
  • Ammo Buyers Talk About Stockpiling
  • Capitol Conversation: Education Funding Lawsuit Goes To State Supreme Court
  • Cherry Creek Mortgage Challenges Fed Health Insurance Mandate Over Religious Beliefs
  • iSeeChange on the Pollen Season: Longer and More Intense

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