NEWS

Local news from around the KVNF listening area.

  Newscast

  • Region 10 seeks 5 million dollars for fiber optic internet
  • County Judge passes away
  • Fruit growers grapple with freezes, constant rain
  • Officers cleared in fatal shooting
  • Solar program wraps up for the North Fork
bull moose
Kent Miller / NPS

The moose population on the Grand Mesa is growing. The area is home to more than 400 of the large animals. This Saturday, July 25 is the sixth annual Grand Mesa Moose Day event. 

Mesa County Health Department

Mosquitoes in Mesa County tested positive for West Nile Virus.

Local officials say this is the first confirmed activity of the virus in area mosquitoes this year. 

However, other counties across Colorado have already reported positive tests to the state health department. 

Jennifer House is a state public health veterinarian.  

"We've recently had an increase in the number of positive mosquitoes," House says. "So far we have been able to find West Nile Virus positive mosquitoes in Boulder, Denver, Larimer, Mesa, Pueblo, and Weld counties."

  Newscast

  • Mosquitoes Test Positive For West Nile In Mesa County
  • State Lawmakers Hold Water Meetings Across Colorado
  • Gunnison Man Sentenced For Damaging Federal Lands In Montrose
  • Event Celebrates Grand Mesa’s Moose Population

A Colorado jury cleared the way for the second phase of the sentencing process for James Holmes, who was found guilty of killing 12 people and injuring 70 more in a shooting rampage at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater. One week after convicting Holmes, the jury confirmed in a unanimous finding Thursday that he's eligible for the death penalty.

The jury said that when Holmes opened fire in a crowded theater in 2012, he acted in "extreme indifference to the value of human life generally."

  Newscast

  • Plane makes emergency landing in Grand Junction
  • Montrose approves separate dispatch center
  • Mesa County man arrested under new child trafficking law
  • Secretary of the Interior fields questions about sage grouse, ColoWyo mine

It's illegal to employ immigrants without documents. But through voluntary work programs in detention centers, the federal government employs thousands of undocumented immigrants. "The government, which forbids everyone else from hiring people without documents, has effectively become the biggest employer of undocumented immigrants in the country," says Carl Takei, an attorney with the ACLU National Prison Project.

The pay for an eight hour shift in a detention center is $1 a day, or roughly 13 cents an hour.

bus, sucap, rroad runner stage lines
SUCAP

This month, marks the one-year anniversary of a regional bus service that connects Durango to Grand Junction. 

The Southern Ute Community Action Programs started Road Runner Stage Lines after Greyhound stopped running the route several years ago. 

KVNF's Laura Palmisano spoke to Clayton Richter, the division director of SUCAP’s Road Runner Transportation, about the service. 


  Newscast

  • Biden Tours Manufacturing Center In Denver, Leads Workforce Roundtable
  • Montrose County Loses Pregnancy Discrimination Lawsuit
  • Rep. Thurlow Launches 2016 Re-­Election Campaign
  • Durango­-Grand Junction Bus Services Marks One Year
  • Issues Continue With Evaporation Pit In Mesa County
  • Comment Period Extended For Proposed Oil & Gas Project Near Somerset

Farmers who grow marijuana for Colorado's legal market are running into problems as they try to control mildew and pests. Because of the plant's illegal status at the federal level, a main source of agricultural guidance isn't available to pot farmers.

Attempts to regulate marijuana production often hit another problem, as the plant's wide range of uses sets it apart from many traditional food crops.

Both houses of Congress have now passed versions of the bill that would update the largest federal education law, known as No Child Left Behind, for the first time since 2001. They are big, meaty and complicated, and now they have to be reconciled into one messy Dagwood sandwich of a bill to go to the president.

Pluto looks to be a far cry from the dead body that many scientists had long presumed. As the New Horizons probe continues to report back from the fringes of the solar system, a word that Mr. Spock might have used sums up the reaction: fascinating.

students, nature
Laura Palmisano / KVNF

In science class students learn about the world around them. However, getting kids to make a connection to nature without them experiencing it firsthand is a challenge. That’s why a Western Slope school district in partnership with a state wildlife agency is taking middle school students to the woods. 

Stacy Lischka, a scientist with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, is surrounded by 15 sixth-graders in a forest on the Grand Mesa. 

She's leading them in lesson on stream ecology. The students are looking for macroinvertebrates, animals without a backbone, in Mesa Creek. 

A last-minute change to an indoor venue due to stormy weather couldn't keep folks away from a dedication ceremony Saturday for Colorado's newest National Monument.  Supporters gathered in bleachers at the Buena Vista High School gym to hear from local, state, and federal officials as they celebrated the designation.

 

The nearly 22,000-acres of public land that stretches from Buena Vista to Salida in Chaffee County along the Arkansas River is well known for its recreation and wildlife. 

  Newscast

  • Identity of motorcyclist who died over the weekend released
  • Survey highlights problems for long term rentals in ski towns
  • Science program brings students out of the classroom and into the woods
  • Road construction begins in Delta, Montrose Counties
  • Colorado gets a new national monument
  • Glenwood Springs wildfire under control

Newscast

  • News rules proposed for coal mines
  • Revenue Silver Mine owner defaults on payments
  • Waldorf type school in Paonia now officially a reality
  • Two deceased campers identified, carbon monoxide poisoning a possibility
  • CDC Issues Guidelines For Backyard Chicken Flocks
  • What's next for the Creamery Arts Center in Hotchkiss?

  Newscast

  • Interior Secretary Sally Jewell Visits Colorado
  • Lightning Suspected Cause Of Two Deaths In Aspen Backcountry
  • Authorities Continue Search For Man Who Attacked Ouray Officers
  • Gas Pipeline Proposed For Public Lands In Mesa County
  • Grand Junction Wants Direct Flights To West Coast, L.A
  • Palisade To Get Bike Skills Park
  • City Of Montrose Tries Diagonal Parking Experiment

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

A jury in Colorado has found Aurora theater shooter James Holmes guilty of first-degree murder in the 2012 mass shooting that killed 12 people and injured 70 others. Holmes could now face the death penalty.

The jury of nine women and three men, who heard nearly three months of testimony in the case, deliberated for a day and a half before arriving at a decision on Thursday.

The verdict comes nearly three years to the day after the mass shooting on July 20, 2012, at the Century Aurora 16 theater.

Newscast

  • Colorado DMV fee changes go into effect
  • Meeting educates public on plan to tackle beetle kill
  • Ride Festival doubles attendance over last year
  • Forest Service makes hard bear proof containers mandatory for campers
  • Lawmakers consider moving state fair from Pueblo

Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles

As of Wednesday, it’s more expensive to get a driver’s license in Colorado.

The Colorado Division Motor Vehicles raised fees for driver services across the board.

It’s now $25 to get a driver’s license. It went up by four bucks. 

It also used to be free to retake the knowledge test or the driving skills test. Now, people have to pay to redo those exams. 

Additionally, the price of a license for an undocumented immigrant increased to about $80, nearly $30 more than last year. 

  Newscast

  • Fire Officials: WCCC Blaze Suspicious, Under Investigation
  • Two Ouray Officers Injured In Attack, Authorities Searching For Suspect
  • Former Olathe Police Chief Appears In Court
  • Woman Sentenced For Stealing Funds From Eagle County
  • Earned Income Tax Credit Triggered For Colorado Residents
  • iSeeChange: Cicadas In Of The West

A year and a half ago, Dr. David Casarett did not take medical marijuana very seriously. "When I first started this project, I really thought of medical marijuana as a joke," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

  Newscast

  • Waldorf school close to becoming reality in Paonia
  • CDOT begins transit system from Denver to Glenwood Springs
  • Food Bank in Grand Junction begins looks for new home
  • Time capsule discovered in Lake City
  • Commissioners fight for grazing, roads in BLM area
Paonia Elementary
Laura Palmisano

A Waldolf-inspired education program in Paonia is a step closer to reality. 

The proposed North Fork School of Integrated Studies has enough students signed up to move forward. 

Delta County Assistant Superintendent Kurt Clay says it will be a school within a school. 

"We are looking at trying to combine that within Paonia Elementary School as a different program or different option for students in the North Fork Valley," said Clay. 

Intent to enroll forms for the K-4 program were due earlier this month. 

  Newscast

  • Delta Commissioners Support Protecting Some North Fork Lands From Oil & Gas Development
  • City Of Montrose Could Create Its Own Regional Dispatch Center
  • Grand Junction Fire Marshal Wants Charges In July Fourth Brush Fire
  • Troop Reductions Spare Much of Fort Carson
  • Colorado Entrepreneur Works To Build A Better Bike Helmet

The defense for James Holmes, accused of the Aurora, Colo., theater shooting, has rested after trying to prove he was insane at the time of the 2012 attack that killed 12 people and injured 70.

Holmes' attorneys had argued their client was in the midst of a psychotic episode at the time of the July 20, 2012, incident.

Two psychiatrists who testified for the defense said Holmes was insane, but court-appointed doctors testified Holmes knew the difference between right and wrong. The Associated Press adds:

Food companies the world over are paying close attention to the groundswell of support for food transparency, the "know where your food comes from" movement.

JBS, the largest meat producer in the world, is beginning to take notice as well.

But executives with JBS USA, the North American arm of its Brazilian parent company, at the same time acknowledge that the very nature of their business is grisly, gory and sometimes unpalatable.

Getting a high school diploma is as good for health as quitting smoking.

That's the finding from a study released Wednesday by researchers at the University of Colorado, New York University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

They found that if every adult high school dropout in the 2010 population had a GED or a regular diploma, 145,243 deaths could be averted.

  Newscast

  • Marijuana grow operation shut down near Cedaredge
  • Unusual July brings cold temps, rain for rest of summer
  • DMEA reacts to outages over past week
  •  A push for solar in Colorado's North Fork Valley

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