NEWS

Local news from around the KVNF listening area.

In U.S. counties with warm winters, temperate summers and beautiful natural resources — like beaches, lakes, hills or mountains — people's rates of affiliation with religious organizations are lower than in other places, according to a new study.

  • Wildfires create hazy conditions in Colorado
  • Federal coal program debated at BLM session in Golden
  • Delta selects firm for city manager search
  • Black Canyon Jet Center in Montrose files federal complaint
  • Fungus affects cottonwood trees in Aspen, Roaring Fork

Like a lot of students, 17-year-old Nick Bain says he really likes his school, but sometimes it can feel like a chore.

"It just feels a little bit like you just have to keep doing one thing after another, but without a whole lot of thinking about an education in general," says Nick.

So one day he decided to write down what he was doing every 15 minutes at the Colorado Academy in Denver.

montrose regional dispatch center
City of Montrose

The city of Montrose is going to create its own regional dispatch center with an estimated price tag of $1.8 million. 


 

  • City of Montrose to create dispatch center
  • CPW seeing increased bear activity
  • Educators address school readiness at state capitol
  • A look at the Telluride Mushroom Festival

  • Wildfires in Colorado are coming under control
  • New data shows record number of suicides for Colorado
  • State regulators urged to finalizes oil and gas recommendations
  • De Beque sees tax revenues from marijuana beyond expectations

The Environmental Protection Agency was investigating an old mine near Silverton, Colo., earlier this month, when it accidentally released 3 million gallons of toxic waste water into the Animas River.

Initially the agency downplayed the incident and provided little information. So Navajo President Russell Begaye traveled to the source of the toxic spill and posted a video of it on Facebook.

In the video, he stands in front of the still-leaking mine.

  • Livestock disease spreads across Western Slope
  • Water storage tank in Paonia requires more repairs
  • Lake City hires new town clerk
  • CPW releases first draft of strategic plan
  • An iSeeChange story looking into the mystery of dying finches

  • Montrose Memorial Hospital takes over local clinic creating women’s health center
  • State program helps Colorado farmers finance small hydropower projects
  • Montrose to disable downtown traffic light
  • Study finds connection fees lead to water savings

  • FBI investigation into Grand Junction Airport fraud is dropped
  • Rocky Mountain Health Plans to raise premium rates by a third
  • A look at the best lightshow in the sky, the Perseid Meteor Shower
  • State agency says Animas River is improving
  • Business groups fight against new EPA air regulations
  • Study finds natural gas development drastically cuts into mule deer habitat

If you want to hang out with a bunch of bees, you'd better be prepared for a little pain.

Mario Padilla, a honeybee researcher at Penn State University, can usually tell when his hives are getting agitated. But he's already been stung three times today. And he's about to get it again.

"I got stung!" Padilla says, half-laughing. "And that was a sting that was not even an invited sting. That was an I-was-minding-my-own-business sting."

  Newscast

  • Body found in Grand Junction culvert ID’ed
  • Two Mesa County men arrested after police discover large pot grow operations
  • San Miguel County gets $330K to boost regional broadband
  • Montrose County conducts emergency exercise at regional airport
  • Mine spill continues causing problems in southwest Colorado, downstream communities

A $6 million project to spiff up the state capitol is almost done. The two-year renovation of the building's signature gold dome is complete; inside the capitol workers are restoring both the House and Senate chambers.

Colorado's capitol opened in 1894 and has gone through a few restorations since then. The latest iteration restores the chambers to how they looked at the turn of the century.

In Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, towns that are downstream from the old gold mine where contaminated wastewater spewed into a river have shut off their water supplies' connections to the spill. Two rivers will remain closed until at least Monday, officials say.

  • Body found in Grand Junction
  • Norwood emergency medical service seeks tax payer help
  • San Miguel commissioners OK ballot question over their own term limits
  • Western Slope now home to a breast milk donation center
  • Olathe receives funds for Main Street improvement project
  • State Capitol building renovation wraps up
fiber optic cable
Laura Palmisano / KVNF

Region 10 received $5.2 million grant from the state to develop better broadband access on the Western Slope. 


Editor's note: This story was originally published on August 9, 2015.

Fresh air, the smell of pine trees, the sounds of birds chirping and brooks babbling — all of these have helped American city-dwellers unwind for generations. But in the era of Jim Crow segregation, nature's calm also gave African-Americans a temporary respite from racism and discrimination.

  • Region 10 Receives $5.2M Grant To Develop Broadband Access In West Slope Communities
  • Delta Once Again Restarts City Manager Search
  • State Lawmakers Have Taken a Tough Look at Death Penalty Over the Years

In an event that has led to health warnings and turned a river orange, the Environmental Protection Agency says one of its safety teams accidentally released contaminated water from a mine into the Animas River in southwest Colorado.

The spill, which sent heavy metals, arsenic and other contaminants into a waterway that flows into the San Juan National Forest, occurred Wednesday. The EPA initially said 1 million gallons of wastewater had been released, but that figure has risen sharply.

From member station KUNC, Stephanie Paige Ogburn reports for our Newscast unit:

Jurors in the trial of Aurora Theater shooter James Holmes did not come to a unanimous final sentencing decision. As a result, the court will impose the sentence of life in prison for Holmes' killing of 12 and injuring of 70 others in 2012. Even though he was spared the death penalty, the trial is likely to once again spark debate over whether Colorado should even have the penalty on the books.

The last attempt to repeal the state's death penalty was in 2013. It was backed by former Representative Claire Levy (D-Boulder).

"I think it's immoral, it's ineffective. I think it doesn't belong in a modern system of justice. I don't think we impose it in a fair impartial way," said Levy. "People don't get executed. They sit waiting the outcome for decades."

James Holmes will get life in prison without the possibility of parole.

The jurors who convicted him of murdering a dozen people and trying to kill 70 more at a midnight movie three years ago could not agree on a death sentence.

The jury of nine women and three men deliberated for less than seven hours over two days.

District Attorney George Brauchler, who had sought to have Holmes executed, said, "I still think death is justice for what that guy did ... but I respect the outcome." He also said the jury did "a hell of a job."

As cities in Colorado expand to accommodate a growing population, so are costs of providing services and utilities. Some communities, like Aurora, a city of 350,000 east of Denver, are reevaluating how they charge for services like water and how those costs might encourage smarter growth.

  • Mine Wastewater Spill Contaminates Animas River In Southwestern Colorado
  • Grand Junction Airport Security Gate Issue Continues, Colorado Congressmen Step In
  • Ute Indian Museum In Montrose Closes For Repairs
  • Connecting The Drops: Water Pricing With Conservation In Mind
La Plata County

About a million gallons of contaminated mine water spilled into a tributary of the Animas River in San Juan County on Wednesday. 

  • Hotchkiss Fire Department Responds To Three Area Blazes
  • Traffic Stop In Mesa County Nets Large Drug Bust
  • Ophir Man Commits Suicide After Wrecking Vehicle
  • Norwood Cat Tests Positive For Plague, Dies
  • Felony DUI Law Goes Into Effect In Colorado
  • What’s Different About The Second Draft Of The Colorado Water Plan?
black bear
U.S. Forest Service

Three laws sponsored by Western Slope legislators go into effect this week. 


  • Laws Sponsored By Western Slope Legislators Go Into Effect
  • ‘Substandard Care’ Likely Contributed To Grand Junction Veteran’s Death, Report Finds
  • Colorado Health Officials React To Obama’s Clean Power Plan
  • Connecting The Drops: Urbanization of Agricultural Land

When people go hiking these days, all kinds of gadgets can help guide their way. But historically, humans used something a lot more low-tech: a pile of rocks.

The piles, technically called cairns, have marked trails for millennia, but in recent years, these stones have become steeped in controversy.

To Beth Dinet, stacking stones provides "an overwhelming sense of peace, and connecting with onenness."

The College Board has just released the latest curriculum framework for its Advanced Placement U.S. history course, and it appears to have satisfied many of the old framework's critics.

The rewrite comes after anger over its 2014 framework sent the College Board, which administers the AP exam, back to the drawing board.

  • Mountain Biker Dies While Competing In Crested Butte Leg of Enduro World Series 
  • After Accident On Popular OHV Road San Miguel Sheriff Calls For Closure To Vehicles
  • Grand Junction Man Arrested In Toddler’s Death
  • Comment Period For Proposed Oil & Gas Project Near Somerset Ends
  • Forest Service Tries To Cope With Beetle Kill, Aspen Decline

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