natural gas

POLITICS
7:37 am
Wed November 5, 2014

Voters In Texas City Approve Ban On Fracking

From left, Topher Jones, Edward Hartmann and Angie Holliday hold a campaign sign outside City Hall in Denton, Texas, on July 15, 2014. Voters in the college town approve a ban on fracking on Tuesday.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Wed November 5, 2014 10:55 am

Residents of Denton, Texas, voted Tuesday to ban hydraulic fracturing in the city.

According to unofficial results posted on the city's website, 58.64 percent of voters supported banning the controversial drilling method that is also called fracking; 41.36 percent voted against the proposition. It's the first time a city in the energy-friendly state has voted to ban fracking.

The vote is expected to be challenged, but Mayor Chris Watts said he would defend the ban.

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POLITICS
2:46 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Keep On Drillin'? Santa Barbara Prepares To Vote On Oil Future

A cow walks near oil pump jacks in Santa Maria, Calif. Oil production has long been a part of Santa Barbara County, but a new ballot measure could effectively shut down all new drilling operations there.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 12:25 pm

Think of California's Santa Barbara County and you might picture the area's famous beaches or resorts and wineries. But in the northern reaches of the vast county, oil production has been a major contributor to the economy for almost a century.

So it's no surprise that the oil industry there is feverishly organizing to fight a local ballot initiative — Measure P — that would ban controversial drilling methods such as hydraulic fracturing. What is turning heads, however, is the sheer volume of money flooding into this local race, mainly from large oil companies.

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ENVIRONMENT
9:53 am
Tue September 9, 2014

A Year Post-Flood, No Mandated Changes For Oil And Gas Operators

An oil and gas site near the St. Vrain Creek. Metal berms replace earthen ones.
Nathan Heffel KUNC

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:00 am

One of the more striking images during the September flood was of inundated oil and gas pads, washed out earthen berms and overturned storage tanks. In all, over 48,000 gallons of oil and condensate spilled.

While changes have been made in the industry to prepare for another flood, so far, they’re strictly voluntary.

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NEWS
11:29 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Connecting The Drops: Water And Power

The Colorado River in Marble Canyon
Credit Joshua M via Flickr (CC-BY)

It takes water to produce electricity, but how much water varies a lot depending on the fuel source and the power generating technology.

In Colorado, around half a percent of our total water usage is used to generate electricity.

It’s a small percentage, says Stacy Tellinghusen, water policy analyst for Western Resource Advocates, a non-profit conservation group, but adds that it’s not inconsequential. 

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NEWS
12:00 am
Wed September 18, 2013

KVNF Local Newscast: Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Headlines

  • Hickenlooper Says Oil and Gas Safety is a Top Priority after Flooding
  • Lyons One of Hardest-Hit Areas in Floods
  • iSeeChange - Signs of Floods to Come?
  • Floods Hurt One Grand Junction-area Business
  • Garfield County Gas Emissions Study Moves Forward 
Energy
10:59 am
Tue October 30, 2012

"War On Coal:" Behind the Rhetoric

Credit Ali Lightfoot

This election season, some political opinions are being boldly expressed around the North Fork Valley. Yard signs read: “STOP THE WAR ON COAL—FIRE OBAMA.” Area coal miners demonstrated the same message on a rainy afternoon a few weeks ago. KVNF’s Ariana Brocious took a look at the economic realities behind the “war on coal” rhetoric.

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Capitol Coverage
9:05 am
Tue October 16, 2012

State Launches Oil and Gas Water Quality Database

In an effort to give the public more information on the impact of oil and gas drilling in their communities – the Colorado Department of Natural Resources is launching a new public database on water quality near drilling well sites. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.