Oil and Gas

  • More towns put municipal internet on November’s ballot
  • Delta considers allowing OHV use on roads
  • Paonia River Park to become ADA compliant
  • Discussions continue for oil and gas industry on how to communicate

  • Wildfires in Colorado are coming under control
  • New data shows record number of suicides for Colorado
  • State regulators urged to finalizes oil and gas recommendations
  • De Beque sees tax revenues from marijuana beyond expectations

  • FBI investigation into Grand Junction Airport fraud is dropped
  • Rocky Mountain Health Plans to raise premium rates by a third
  • A look at the best lightshow in the sky, the Perseid Meteor Shower
  • State agency says Animas River is improving
  • Business groups fight against new EPA air regulations
  • Study finds natural gas development drastically cuts into mule deer habitat

  • Mountain Biker Dies While Competing In Crested Butte Leg of Enduro World Series 
  • After Accident On Popular OHV Road San Miguel Sheriff Calls For Closure To Vehicles
  • Grand Junction Man Arrested In Toddler’s Death
  • Comment Period For Proposed Oil & Gas Project Near Somerset Ends
  • Forest Service Tries To Cope With Beetle Kill, Aspen Decline

Dan Haley spent 20 years as a journalist and editor, the bulk of which was with The Denver Post. He then joined the private sector as a media consultant. Now though, Haley has taken on a new role – as the executive director of the state's largest oil and gas industry trade group, the Colorado Oil and Gas Association.

  Newscast

  • Biden Tours Manufacturing Center In Denver, Leads Workforce Roundtable
  • Montrose County Loses Pregnancy Discrimination Lawsuit
  • Rep. Thurlow Launches 2016 Re-­Election Campaign
  • Durango­-Grand Junction Bus Services Marks One Year
  • Issues Continue With Evaporation Pit In Mesa County
  • Comment Period Extended For Proposed Oil & Gas Project Near Somerset

  Newscast

  • Interior Secretary Sally Jewell Visits Colorado
  • Lightning Suspected Cause Of Two Deaths In Aspen Backcountry
  • Authorities Continue Search For Man Who Attacked Ouray Officers
  • Gas Pipeline Proposed For Public Lands In Mesa County
  • Grand Junction Wants Direct Flights To West Coast, L.A
  • Palisade To Get Bike Skills Park
  • City Of Montrose Tries Diagonal Parking Experiment

  Newscast

  • Delta Commissioners Support Protecting Some North Fork Lands From Oil & Gas Development
  • City Of Montrose Could Create Its Own Regional Dispatch Center
  • Grand Junction Fire Marshal Wants Charges In July Fourth Brush Fire
  • Troop Reductions Spare Much of Fort Carson
  • Colorado Entrepreneur Works To Build A Better Bike Helmet

When you flip on a light switch, odds are, you're burning coal. But as the fracking boom continues to unleash huge quantities of natural gas, the nation's electric grid is changing. Power plants are increasingly turning to this low-cost, cleaner-burning fossil fuel.

Bill Pentak stands in the middle of a construction site, looking up at his company's latest project towering overhead — a new natural gas power plant.

  Newscast

  • Boy Scouts stranded on snowy mountain trail
  • Health officials concerned over possible mosquito surge
  • Montrose County School District struggles with budget
  • More oil and gas wells planned for Mesa County
  • North Fork residents travel to D.C. to weigh in on Thompson Divide lease swap

There's a serious problem in the American economy: Big corporations are doing well, but real household income for average Americans has been falling over the past decade — down 9 percent, according to census data.

"That's not good for America," says Harvard economist Michael Porter. "That's not good for America's standard of living. That's not good for our ultimate vitality as a nation."

It's been a month since Colorado lawmakers wrapped up their 2015 legislative session at the state capitol, but the work is far from over. Many of the bills that failed this year will likely be back next session and some long-standing issues may already be poised to go before voters in 2016.

Energy development is always a hot topic at the statehouse, but 2015 was oddly quiet. Even with recommendations from a task force studying the issue, state lawmakers did little this past session where oil and gas drilling is concerned. As a result, some of the more long-standing issues as local control and public health concerns are still simmering.

Several counties across the Western Slope have supported the Thompson Divide lease swap.  Delta County was one of the last holdouts, but they made their decision on Monday.

As a result of Colorado's booming oil production, energy companies are paying more in severance taxes – money they pay the state for taking minerals out of the ground. Half of it is supposed to go to back to local communities, both directly and through grants. But thanks to market forces – and political conditions in Denver – it's not always a stable source of funding.

The Department of the Interior has unveiled new regulations on hydraulic fracturing operations that take place on federal lands, requiring companies using the drilling technique to ensure wells are safe and to disclose chemicals used in the process.

The rules change follows a more than three-year review process and will affect the 90 percent of oil and gas wells on federal lands that now use so-called fracking to extract oil and gas.

  Newscast

  • I-­70 snow tire law progresses in capitol
  • Colorado gets first ever aerial firefighting research center
  • Controversial driver’s license program receives compromise funding
  • Ridgway elections canceled
  • Head of Colorado Oil and Gas Commission steps down
  • Town Hall meeting scheduled for Saturday

The executive director of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, Tisha Schuller, recently announced that she's leaving the state's largest trade organization for the energy industry.

In a statement released by COGA, Schuller said it was a "wild ride" and that she was honored to have represented the state's oil industry. While remaining in her position until the end of May, Schuller sat down to talk about the future of the industry and why she decided to leave her position.

Newscast

  • Tipton plans visit to the Western Slope
  • Oil and gas future discussed at forum as well as task force recommendations
  • Solar facility saves city of Grand Junction thousands
  • I­-70 construction to start up again
  • GOP religious liberty bills draw criticism, fail in state House
  • Artists capture North Fork in art installation

Editor's Note: KVNF's Regional Newscast for Wednesday, March 11, 2015 did not air due to technical difficulties. We apologize for any confusion. 

Reaction at the state capitol to work of the Oil and Gas Task Force was decidedly mixed. Members of the governor's own party called the effort a failure, one lawmaker even graded it an "F+."

The proposed recommendations are intended to mitigate the impacts of energy development near communities. While the task force wants local governments to be more involved in developing large drill sites, it stopped short of allowing cities and counties to adopt rules stricter than the state standards.

With the final nine recommendations to hit Governor John Hickenlooper's desk Feb. 27, what are his thoughts on the group's work and the backlash?

After five months of meetings, and coming up with nine recommendations, the work of Governor John Hickenlooper's Oil and Gas Task Force is getting mixed reviews from lawmakers at the state capitol.

Among the critical voices is Democratic Senator Matt Jones of Longmont.

"What they were charged to come up with is strong community protections, they got an F+, they're talking about how it's really a B, it's not," Jones said.

Oil companies in North Dakota are looking for the fastest and cheapest way to get their product to refineries, and they've set their sights on moving more of their product by rail to the Northwest.

There are six new oil terminals proposed for Washington state. Half of them could be built in the small communities around Grays Harbor, a bay on the Pacific coast about 50 miles north of the mouth of the Columbia River.

It's a busy week under the gold dome. The Governor's oil and gas task force, which was charged with trying to harmonize local oil and gas regulations with statewide interests will soon be wrapping up. Many lawmakers have been holding off on introducing oil and gas legislation until the commission finishes its work.

A debate on drones - one that does not fall along party lines - will get a hearing in the Senate Tuesday. For thoughts on what's happening at the capitol, talked to some of the reporters who work there daily.

Out on Oklahoma's flat prairie, Medford, population about 900, is the kind of place where people give directions from the four-way stop in the middle of town.

It seems pretty sedate, but it's not. "We are shaking all the time," says Dea Mandevill, the city manager. "All the time."

The afternoon I stopped by, Mandevill says two quakes had already rumbled through Medford.

"Light day," she laughs. But, she adds, "the day's not over yet; we still have several more hours."

Mandevill may be laughing it off, but Austin Holland, the state seismologist, isn't.

  Newscast

  • San Miguel Sheriff requests detox facility in new medical center
  • Changes to big game hunting rules
  • 13-year-old dies in Mesa County ATV accident
  • Colorado bill would fund successful birth control program
  • Data released over marijuana DUI arrests
  • Oil and gas task force  meets today
  • Colorado National Monument superintendent to move to park in Utah
Flickr user diwineanddine

Last Friday saw two big developments concerning oil and gas development in the North Fork Valley.

Governor John Hickenlooper gave his annual State of the State Address in front of a joint session of the General Assembly Thursday. In the speech the governor spoke of his upcoming policies, initiatives, budget proposals and some looming state challenges.

So what does it all mean for the year ahead?

Jim Ramey / Citizens for a Healthy Community

Friday saw the release of a document that’s been a long time in the making.

Governor John Hickenlooper received a warm reception from lawmakers in both parties during his annual State of the State Address. The Governor talked about policies he wants the legislature to adopt, announced a few new initiatives and urged lawmakers to face facts about the challenges facing Colorado.

During his roughly 45-minute speech Hickenlooper highlighted many of his budget proposals, such as giving more money to higher education and K-12 schools. He also pledged to look at ways to creatively fund roads and bridges, and threw his support behind a felony DUI law. Colorado is one of four states without one.

While oil and gas development is a hot topic, state legislators are waiting for a report from the Governor's Oil and Gas Task Force, mostly holding off on introducing energy related bills. The task force is charged with crafting recommendations to help mitigate the impacts of drilling to communities, and harmonize local and state regulations.

"I have told some members of the task force, you don't have to send something if there's not a problem," said Senator Jerry Sonnenberg (R-Sterling). "I want to know before you send me a solution, the problem we're trying to fix. And if you can't agree on a problem, don't send me legislation just because you're a task force."

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