It’s May in Rocky Mountain National Park, but on a mountainside 10,829 feet above sea level, snow is falling. It’s pelting Jim Cheatham, a biologist with the National Park Service. Shrugging off the cold, Cheatham seizes a teachable moment. This snow, he said, holds more than just water.

“Chances are it’s carrying the excess nitrogen we’re talking about,” mused Cheatham.

For the past eight years, the biologist has spent most of his time thinking about how nitrogen pollution is changing the park’s forests, wildflowers, and alpine lakes. He’s also been looking for a way to stop it.


  • 5,250 Gallons of Oil Spill into South Platte River
  • Norwood Bans Commercial Marijuana
  • Town of Telluride & Telluride Science Research Center Reach Agreement on New Facility
  • Bicyclist Hit and Killed at HWY 50 and Lands End Road South of Grand Junction
  • Energy Companies Concerned about New Wildlife Habitat Regulations