Renewable Energy

  • Runaway Delta teen found safe
  • Racial profiling data collection bill initially passes House
  • SEI launches Delta County solar campaign
  • An interview with the new director of the National Renewable Energy Lab  

Americans throw away about a third of our available food.

But what some see as trash, others are seeing as a business opportunity. A new facility known as the Heartland Biogas Project is taking wasted food from Colorado's most populous areas and turning it into electricity. Through a technology known as anaerobic digestion, spoiled milk, old pet food and vats of grease combine with helpful bacteria in massive tanks to generate gas.

EIA

A recent federal report looks at changes in how the United States generates its electricity. It shows a significant drop in the amount of power coming from coal. 


The wastewater treatment plant in Grand Junction, Colo., takes in 8 million gallons of raw sewage — what's flushed down the toilet and sinks.

Processing this sewage produces a lot of methane, which the plant used to just burn off into the air.

The process was "not good for the environment and a waste of a wonderful resource," says Dan Tonello, manager of the Persigo Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Now, using more infrastructure, the facility refines the methane further to produce natural gas chemically identical to what's drilled from underground.

Colstrip, Mont., is true to its name — it exists because of coal.

"Our coal's getting deeper, like everywhere else, because everybody's mining. They're getting into the deeper stuff," says Kevin Murphy, who has worked in the Rosebud Mine for 15 years running a bulldozer in the open pits.

Everything about the mine is enormous, especially the dragline, a machine as big as a ship with a giant boom that extends 300 feet up into the air. The dragline perches on the lip of the pit, scraping away hundreds of feet of rocky soil to reveal the black seam of coal below.

  Newscast

  • Paonia holds hearing for town clerk’s dismissal
  • Woman charged with day care child abuse offered plea deal
  • North Fork Ambulance desperately needs money
  • Distilleries might be able to serve food soon
  • Democrats kill Republican bill to lower renewable energy requirements 
Ali Lightfoot/KVNF

For the past few months, KVNF’s Programming Director Ali Lightfoot has been helping local kids produce radio stories as a part of our youth reporting project, Pass the Mic.

The project is now in its second year and is a collaboration of KVNF and the North Fork Heart and Soul Project. The stories these kids produce tackle a number of contentious issues, one of them being the energy industry. 

Headlines:

  • Grand Junction Police Dropping Stolen Monkey Investigation
  • Small Hydro Plant near Silverton First to be exempt from Federal Permits
  • Study Says Many Public Lands in Colorado Aren’t Accessible
  • Conservation Groups Fighting Fees for Uphill Skiers, Coasters at Ski Resorts
  • A Major Winter Storm this week could affect our weather into next summer
  • Volunteers Gather to Wrap Christmas Presents for Those in Need

Headlines

  • Colorado Wind Industry Expected to Grow
  • Baca County Farmer Harvests First Hemp Crop in 56 Years
  • Government Shutdown Not Affecting Mines Yet
  • Thompson Divide Drilling Talks Suggest Deal is in the Works
  • iSeeChange - Journaling with the Hardings
  • Grand Valley Water Officials Say State Should Import Water to Meet Demand
  • Delta County Commissioners Discuss Efforts to Protect Sage Grouse
  • Mountain Village's Green Gondola Project to Install 10 New Solar Panels
  • More Colorado Marijuana on Black Market Than Ever Before
  • Prison Dairy Serves Up Buffalo Milk

 

  • Six Garfield County Fisheries May See Instream Flow Protections
  • Study Finds Colorado Solar Installations are Cheapest in Nation
  • Colorado's First Biomass Power Palnt Nearly Complete
  • Committee Debates Feasibility of New Renewables Standard for Rural Providers
  • More Cases of West Nile Virus Confirmed in Delta County
  • iSeeChange - Apple Economics of Western Colorado