Short public affairs programs played throughout the KVNF program schedule, including:
NPS photo by Neal Herbert -

Today I am going to discuss a few simple tips that will allow you to take pictures of the night sky.  These may not compare with professional images, but they will be YOUR images!

Ken Crawford

This is a continuing series on Women in Astronomy.  Today we meet Williamina Fleming.

It is easy to see that the sky above is blue. So why blue?  

If you rise early on these crisp October mornings, you may see an eye-catching planetary sight in our pre-dawn sky. 

Daniel V. Schroeder

It’s that time of year again… Watching the leaves change color with cooling temperatures, warm apple cider, a pumpkin patch, light seems to slip away sooner.  What marks the fall season for you?

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park
Courtesy of Greg Owens

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park has long been known for some of the steepest cliffs, oldest rock, and craggiest spires in North America. The Gunnison River has sculpted this vertical wilderness of rock, water, and sky.  A grand piece of this wild landscape includes the pristine dark skies.

NAOJ, JAXA, NASA, Lockheed Martin

What is that brilliant light in the sky? If you are an early riser you may see a jewel in the east. Called the “morning star” as well as the “evening star” by cultures the world over, this light flickers a bit less than stars. It is not a star but the planet Venus. Had you looked about a month ago, Venus would have been the “evening star,” ripe for viewing by night owls. This planet is often referred to as our “sister” planet.

Art Trevena

The summer night sky elicits an extra sparkle of excitement when we see the silvery, arcing band of the Milky Way, a beautiful cross-cut view of our home galaxy.