Summer

Jeff Reynolds

Gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen and KVNF host Jill Spears ruminate on late summer/early fall gardening matters, while masticating the fruits of their labors...

Lance also brought in a curiosity - a fruit from an Osage orange tree that he has growing at his place.  These are common as hedgerows in plains states, and their wood was prized by Native Americans for  making bows.

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen nibble on Lance's delicious Reliance seedless grapes while discussing the state of late-summer gardening & harvesting. Anthony calls with a question about how to transplant some 100-year-old raspberry plants.

What's Up On Redlands Mesa? Farm, Garden & Artists' Studio Tour

Jill, Lance & Lulu get started with a sample of corn smut from Lance's garden. (Corn smut is an edible fungus that infects corn. It's considered a delicacy in Mexico.)

Public Domain (CC0)

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart discuss summer gardening tips, sample some wild plums, and entertain the burning question "Why isn't composting an Olympic sport?"

By Sage Ross (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Host Jill Spears visits with gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen about mid-season garden cleanup & other topics. Amber calls to ask what might be eating her hops, leaving "skeletonized" leaves. Lulu's neighbor Ben calls with a seed-saving question.

Host Jill Spears & gardeners Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart discuss summer gardening & take listener calls.

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart discuss the latest happenings in their gardens.

CCO Public Domain

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen discuss the latest news from their gardens. A whole lotta plantin' still going on.

Something took out Lulu's squash plants - a mystery!

Volunteer plants popping up here & there - tomatoes, squash, etc.

 

Chelsea Bookout

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen dig deep into summer garden tips. Georgia calls with a question about fire blight. Toni wonders what to do with wild sumac berries. Lance has a trick question about mulberries.

Chelsea Bookout

Summer is here & the gardening crew is deep in the thick of it. Jill, Lulu & Lance are joined this week by special guest Ron Godin, Soil Scientist from CSU Extension. He discusses treating peach trees for gummosis, a fungal disease, and using specific cover crops to help control pests such as soil nematodes.  Did you know that winter rye can actually crowd out bindweed?

Spring turns into summer - a solstice edition of the show! Jill, Lance & Lulu discuss the latest news from the gardens, and take calls.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears visits with gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen.  Lots of food coming out of the gardens at this time of year. The crew takes calls from several listeners. There's even a tip for how to have a bit of fresh asparagus in the middle of August!

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen chat about current conditions in the garden & take calls from Redlands Mesa, Montrose & even Monticello, Utah.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Another lively conversation about gardening issues with host Jill Spears & gardeners Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart.

Host Jill Spears & gardeners Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart chat about the onset of summer and what's happening in their gardens, and they take calls from listeners.

June Solstice

With the arrival of warmer temperatures, perhaps you’ve been enjoying some outings to the mountains or a float trip on a river.  While there is no doubt that summer is in full swing here in western Colorado, it’s not until this coming Saturday that the Universe makes it official. 

"P Kaech" via thealmanac.org

Last week, users on the Almanac reported seeing the summer's first sunflowers. One user was surprised to see the flowers were blooming already. 

University of Maryland Biology Professor David Inouye says the early blooming season probably has to do with the warmer weather as of late. Inouye spends his summers studying flowers at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory near Crested Butte. His current project involves looking at how the timing of flowering and abundance of flowering at changing. 

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Summer peak in an alpine wilderness.

On  clear August nights,  the Milky Way extends brilliantly from our southern  horizon, creating a beautiful vision of stars,  reflected light, nebulae, gas and dust.   As darkness falls, and you step outside, it first appears as a band of clouds reaching across the sky. These "clouds" are actually stars that cannot be distinguished from one another with the unaided eye.  In the southern portion you will be able to pick out constellations like Sagittarius, the Archer, more commonly known as “the teapot”, and Scorpius, the scorpion, pinchers reaching upward, tail trailing.