Water Rights

On September 15th, KVNF presented a statewide call-in show on the Colorado River, looking at water issues and the future of the Colorado River. 

The program is a part of the year-long collaborative reporting series Connecting the Drops, and is hosted by KDNK in Carbondale, KRCC in Colorado Springs and KGNU in Boulder. 

Guests on the program include Taylor Hawes, a Nature Conservancy program director (who testified before a Senate committee on the Colorado River), Jim Pokrandt with the Colorado River District, and a representative from Colorado Springs Utility.

Maeve Conran

A complex series of agreements govern the distribution of water throughout the state.  Along the Colorado River, farms, cities & towns, and the recreation industry are all big players.  But everyone takes a backseat to a tiny hydroelectric plant that’s over one hundred years old.  It’s the Shoshone Generating Station, and it plays a critical role on the Upper Colorado.

Headlines

  • US Forest Service Unveils Plan for Forest Recovery
  • More Snow Possible for Western Colorado
  • Connecting the Drops - Hydropower on the Colorado River
  • Coloradans Enrolling in New Health Exchange in Higher Numbers
Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio

This Fall, a local river conservation group is keeping a close eye on the Fryingpan River. This follows last year's drought that brought the levels on the river down. 

Headlines

  • Heather Jensen Will Stand Trial in Grand Junction
  • Water Conflicts Escalating between Agriculture and Growing Colorado Cities
  • Aspen Medical Marijuana Dispensary Gears Up for Retail Sales
  • Colorado Oil and Gas Association Donates Over $604,000 to Pro-Fracking Campaigns
  • KVNF Sports Report

Connecting the Drops: "Buy and Dry"

Oct 18, 2013
Maeve Conran

Water has always been a source of conflict in the arid West, but in recent years the conflict between agriculture and growing cities has escalated as both entities compete for this limited resource.

On Sunday, September 15, KVNF will broadcast a live statewide call-in show focusing on the Colorado River. 

Wolfgang Staudt via Flickr (CC BY)

In May, as the drought lingered for yet another year, Governor John Hickenlooper issued an executive order to the Colorado Water Conservation Board, calling for a new Colorado Water Plan “that will support agriculture in rural Colorado and align state policy to the state’s water values.” Hickenlooper also paid tribute to Colorado’s historic water law, which claims first in time, first in right.

 

  • Six Garfield County Fisheries May See Instream Flow Protections
  • Study Finds Colorado Solar Installations are Cheapest in Nation
  • Colorado's First Biomass Power Palnt Nearly Complete
  • Committee Debates Feasibility of New Renewables Standard for Rural Providers
  • More Cases of West Nile Virus Confirmed in Delta County
  • iSeeChange - Apple Economics of Western Colorado
Maeve Conran

In early July, Colorado designated 14 counties "primary natural disaster areas" due to agricultural losses caused by the recent and ongoing drought.  Several of those counties are in the San Luis Valley in south central Colorado.  Farmers there are now eligible for low interest emergency loans, but as KGNU’s Maeve Conran reports, that may not be enough for this agricultural hub, which is facing a long term water crisis that could permanently affect the entire valley.  

Travis Bubenik, KVNF

For this week’s iSeeChange report, we explore concerns about ditch lining in the area, and whether these manmade environmental changes (much like the ditches themselves) may alter their surroundings.

Last week on the Almanac, Stewart Mesa resident noticed fewer numbers of wasps around her house. She says usually by this time of the summer, her front porch is practically overrun with wasps. But this year they seem to have disappeared.