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Love Locks Weigh Paris Bridge Down

Jun 10, 2014



Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Happy couples have attached one too many love locks to a popular bridge in Paris. The bridge closed last night after part of it crumbled under the weight of thousands of padlocks, hooked there to symbolize endless love. Thousands of Parisians have signed a petition to remove all those locks, but this morning the bridge reopened to pedestrians. So Paris remains locked in battle over a lover's tradition for a little while longer. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.



Good morning. I'm David Greene. Yesterday we reported on the U.S. men's soccer team as it heads to Brazil for the World Cup. Shortly afterwards, a scolding tweet came in over a misuse of some sports language. Soccer matches, we were told, don't tie, they draw. You also don't say two goals to nothing - it's two to nil. Like this...


UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Manchester United now they are stopped by two goals to nil.

A short-lived attack near Karachi's airport today interrupted prayers for security officers who died in Sunday's violence at the facility. The attackers fled after firing shots near the Airport Security Force training facility, causing flights to be halted temporarily.

"3 to 4 terrorists fired near ASF Camp, ran away," reads a tweet from Army spokesman Major Gen. Asim Bajwa. "No breach of fence, no entry. Chase is on, situation under control."

Five U.S. service members died in southern Afghanistan in a possible case of friendly fire. Afghan media are citing a local official who says the troops' air support mistakenly bombed their position. The attack is still under investigation.

Update at 2:45 p.m. ET: More From Pentagon

"We have reason to suspect that friendly fire was the cause here, specifically from the air," Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said without elaborating.

"This is a tragic incident all around and our thoughts and prayers go out to the families," Kirby said.

To hear Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and once and maybe future Democratic presidential candidate tell it, her new book, Hard Choices, isn't the kickoff to a 2016 campaign.

She still hasn't made up her mind about another run for the presidency, she told Renee Montagne, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition. It's more a review of the decisions she made as the nation's top diplomat.

Below are excerpts from Hillary Clinton's interview Monday with NPR's Renee Montagne. Clinton's new book, Hard Choices, will be published Tuesday.

Portions of this interview will air on Morning Edition.

On running for president in 2016

HILLARY CLINTON: I have made some hard choices, and I face some hard choices. And, as I say in the book, I have not made a decision yet. ...

RENEE MONTAGNE: This is, may I say, a classic campaign book. ...

Under a legal settlement, BP has been sending money to businesses affected by the 2010 Gulf of Mexico spill. The company said the terms of the settlement are being misinterpreted. The court disagreed.

Militants are attacking a security training facility near the Karachi airport. The incident comes less than two days after a deadly attack on the Karachi airport itself.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



We're going to hear next about the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. It's a short one.

MICHAEL WALDMAN: One sentence, lots of commas and lots of confusion.

Some of the toughest stuff in nature is spider silk — as strong, ounce for ounce, as nylon. And a silk web makes a great trap for prey, as well as a nice place for a spider to live.

Skip Stiles stands on the edge of a small inlet known as the Hague, near downtown Norfolk, Va. The Chrysler Museum of Art is nearby, as are dozens of stately homes, all threatened by the water.

If someone tapped your Internet connection, what would he find out about you?

It's been just over a year since Edward Snowden became a household name, and his disclosures about the reach and extent of the National Security Agency's online monitoring programs led to headlines around the world.

But one big, basic question remains more or less unanswered: What exactly does the NSA's surveillance reveal?

To try to answer that question, I had my home office bugged.

It's been a little more than a year since San Jose, Calif., increased the city's minimum wage by $2 per hour, with adjustments for inflation. Now at $10.15 an hour, it's one of the state's highest.

Back in 2012, as voters were debating the wage hike, some in the restaurant and hospitality industry warned that an increase would be bad for the sector. It would deter new businesses from opening, they said, and would cause existing businesses to slash hours for employees.

So how are San Jose's businesses faring today? The answer is, it depends.

Japan, which earlier this year said it would scale back what it has described as "research whaling," is signaling that it wants to go back to a larger hunt.

"I want to aim for the resumption of commercial whaling by conducting whaling research," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said.

Japan, which is a signatory to a 1986 International Whaling Commission moratorium, has nonetheless continued to hunt cetaceans using a loophole in the ban that allows taking some whales for scientific purposes.

A single legislator in Virginia's statehouse normally doesn't rate much attention beyond, say, his or her district or Richmond, the state capital.

But then again, the resignation of a single Democratic state senator doesn't normally shift control of Virginia's Senate from Democrats to Republicans — a move that possibly stops dead in its tracks Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe's plans to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

Supreme Court Rules Against Homeowners In Superfund Case

Jun 9, 2014

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that a federal law seeking to improve accountability for environmental spills and pollution can be circumvented by certain kinds of state laws.

The federal Superfund law supersedes state statutes of limitations. Instead the federal law dictates that lawsuits alleging environmental injury need only be filed when individuals either first learn or should have learned that they have been harmed. But what the court gave with one hand, it took away with the other, ruling that rare state statutes of another sort can limit lawsuits in a different way.

China is calling a friendly get-together between soldiers of Vietnam and the Philippines on islands in the South China Sea claimed by Beijing "a clumsy farce," demanding that the two countries cease-and-desist.

Why NYC Is Afraid Of Free Lunch For All

Jun 9, 2014

More than 30 million kids a year participate in the National School Lunch Program, getting free or reduced-price meals at school. Hunger experts believe many more qualify but don't use it because a.) their families haven't filled out the necessary paperwork or b.) they don't want to be seen as poor.

Sitting in a dentist's chair hardly rates as a vacation. But every year, tens of thousands of people go to a tiny border town near Yuma, Ariz., that has proclaimed itself the dental capital of Mexico.

Los Algodones is a virtual dental factory. Some 350 dentists work within a few blocks of downtown. Because of the low prices and fast service, most patients come for major work.

President Obama made big news today for student loan borrowers. He said he'll use his executive power to expand a program called Pay As You Earn, which limits borrowers' monthly debt payments to 10 percent of their discretionary income. Under the program, loans don't just get less expensive; they can actually disappear. The balance of a loan is forgiven after 20 years — 10 years if the borrower works in public service (for government or a nonprofit).

Apple Jacks The Headphone Port

Jun 9, 2014

Apple may be set to end its use of the standard 3.5mm headphone connector — the mini plug — in favor of its proprietary connector, the Lightning port. If it was to do that, new iPhones, iPads and iPods wouldn't work with old headphones. It's had more than a few industry folks and Apple fanatics upset, to say the least.

As Detroit's bankruptcy trial inches closer, groups are contributing funds to what's become known as the "Grand Bargain" — the effort to protect retired city workers' pensions and the Detroit Institute of Arts from creditors. General Motors, Ford and Chrysler just announced they will pitch in, too. But, as Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the entire Grand Bargain could unravel if the city's retirees reject the deal.

A fractured U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that when parents wait years to win legal entry into the United States, their children may have to go to the back of the line when they turn 21. The court's decision came on a 5-to-4 vote, with the majority split into two camps.

Under the Immigration Act, citizens and lawful permanent residents may sponsor family members petitions' for visas and green cards. In most cases, those immigrating with a minor child stand in line with their children. But even after approval, the process of getting a visa can take as long as decades.

The World Cup kicks off Thursday in Brazil, and ESPN viewers can expect to hear the familiar voice of lead play-by-play commentator Ian Darke. This will be his sixth World Cup, and he tells Melissa Block how he keeps track of the more than 700 players participating at this year's tournament. He even shares a reoccurring nightmare he has about calling games.

People who take statin medications are less active than those not taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs, a study finds.

And that's a problem, because lack of activity increases the risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as other diseases. That's just what the statins are supposed to prevent. So people may be canceling out the good work of the statins if they're putting in more couch time.

Our first thought was that these people were taking it easy because hey, who needs to sweat when those statins are hard at work lowering cholesterol?

A computer program masquerading as a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy has reached a technological and philosophical threshold by passing the so-called Turing Test: it fooled a third of its human interlocutors into believing they were conversing with a real person instead of a machine.

A married couple apparently killed two police officers and another woman in Las Vegas. The husband and wife, also killed in the shooting, appear to have held anti-government and anti-law enforcement views.

President Obama is signing an executive order Monday, which will expand a loan forgiveness program for college debt. NPR's Mara Liasson looks at the program and the political salience of the issue.



It's been billed as a breakthrough in artificial intelligence - a computer in England has fooled human beings into thinking it is a 13-year-old boy, not by the way it looks, but by the way it chats through instant messaging. NPR's Aarti Shahani reports some analysts are unimpressed by this digital trickery.

AARTI SHAHANI, BYLINE: A team from the University of Reading put the computer through a test - it's called the Turing Test - and to pass it, the computer had to fool people.



From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.