David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

Ground control to Buzz Aldrin! The Apollo 11 astronaut is reportedly recovering well in a New Zealand hospital, after being evacuated with medical problems from Antarctica last week. And he's being helped by none other than Dr. David Bowie. Not the late pop star David Bowie, whose 1969 Space Oddity song was released just days before Aldrin walked on the moon. His doctor is named David Bowie. Aldrin's manager posted a photo of the the astronaut and his doctor on Twitter, noting, you can't make...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Until a few days ago, if you visited www.clintonkaine.com, you'd find a story. JEREMY PETER GREEN: Timartinus (ph) Kaine - he would help Hillary vanquish Don Marvolo Trump, known in popular parlance as He Who Must Not Be Elected. GREENE: That's the author of this story, Jeremy Peter Green - no relation. Green bought the domain clintonkaine.com in 2011 for $8. He's been using this site to showcase his "Harry-Potter...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Good morning. I'm David Greene with a story of a village that is now flush with amenities. It's located on an island in the South Pacific. The village, Paunangisu, had a problem. Tourists just wouldn't visit. Their buses just drove by, but that's before the village built the best public toilet in the South Pacific - at least that's what the roadside billboard proclaims. Their logic - everyone likes a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID REENE, HOST: Good morning, I'm David Greene. A customer at a sushi restaurant in LA brought his pet snake to dinner. Restaurant managers demanded he leave. He did. But here's the twist. Minutes later he was back with a bigger snake, a 13-foot-long python that he let loose in the restaurant. The fire department and animal services arrived on the scene. The man was arrested. And the snake, they found it by the cash register,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: We are marking the anniversary of a tragedy today. One year ago, Andreas Lubitz, a co-pilot for the airline Germanwings, deliberately crashed a plane into the French Alps, killing all 150 people on board. French investigators said Lubitz had developed symptoms that, quote, "could result in a psychotic depressive episode." Now in Europe and also in the United States, the system for tracking pilots' mental health...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Good morning. I'm David Greene. Smokers in Chicago have been planting too many cigarette butts at the beaches along Lake Michigan. The Chicago Tribune reports 52,000 butts were found in the sand last year. The Alliance for the Great Lakes is fighting back at the ballot box - well, they're bringing out ballot boxes where smokers can toss butts in one box or another to weigh in on key issues like Cubs...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: There's a historic ball game tonight in Havana. Major League Baseball's Tampa Bay Rays play Cuba's national team. President Obama will be there. So will 87-year-old Felipe Nunez. FELIPE NUNEZ: Baseball? Tremendously important. You know, I was raised following the Yankees since I was 9 years old, you know? GREENE: Nunez is a Cuban-American who lives in Florida. He and his son, Mario, were eating at a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Voters delivered a surprise last night. Michigan gave a Democratic primary win to Bernie Sanders. DAVID GREENE, HOST: He narrowly defeated Hillary Clinton despite polls that showed him far behind. That was just one result on a night when Clinton also won Mississippi, not to mention Republican wins for Donald Trump and also Ted Cruz. INSKEEP: Let's focus on the Democratic results now with NPR's national...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Let's sort out what happened in New Hampshire yesterday. Huge, huge wins for Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, two men whose candidacies were not considered all that serious a year ago. I'm joined by NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea. Hey, Don. DON GONYEA, BYLINE: Hi, David. GREENE: So what happened yesterday? You've covered New Hampshire a couple times. What's your overall impression? GONYEA: Well,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene at a coffee shop in Des Moines, Iowa. Well, caucus night is over. Ted Cruz was the winner on the Republican side. Hillary Clinton won on the Democratic side by a razor-thin margin. And then came this ritual in American politics - a caravan of planes left Des Moines and headed overnight for Manchester, N.H. I am joined in this coffee shop in Des Moines by two of my colleagues who...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: This is shaping up to be another tumultuous day in the financial markets. Stock prices are already falling this morning, and this comes after a big selloff in Asia and Europe. Once again, the turmoil seems to have started in China. And we have NPR's Jim Zarroli on the line to help us understand this. Jim, good morning. JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Good morning. GREENE: So the markets have just opened in New...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: A young man who caused a huge controversy by trying to jack up the price of a life-saving drug is back in the news. Martin Shkreli was arrested this morning and will reportedly be charged with securities and wire fraud. The charges stem from his time as CEO of a biotechnology company called Retrophin. An outside counsel to the company has also been charged. And let's talk about this with NPR's Jim...

Los Angeles is a region better known for Hollywood, but it actually has more manufacturing jobs than any other metro area in the U.S. Of the more than half-million manufacturing jobs in the region, about 50,000 of them are in the garment industry. Fashion is a big part of LA's identity, and you feel it in the Fashion District downtown. It has changed a lot since the late 1980s, when plain beige towers called California Mart bustled with all things related to the garment industry. Brian...

In 2015, what's American made? The U.S. is known for manufacturing — it's part of our identity, though jobs have been lost. They've gone overseas. Technology has changed the way things are made. Nevertheless, America is still making stuff. And in terms of jobs, the Los Angeles area is the biggest manufacturing hub in the country. There are a few reasons why. There is plenty of space here to build things like factories and runways. That beautiful California weather? It's actually great for...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: We have breaking news this morning of the death of the man who planned the attacks in Paris last Friday. His name is Abdel Hamid Abaaoud. He was in the apartment that police raided yesterday morning in a Paris suburb. And until now, police had said it was difficult to determine whether he had died in that raid. The Paris prosecutor now says that he did indeed die in that raid. And NPR counterterrorism...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris this morning where there is news that the man who is suspected of having planned the attacks here in Paris last Friday that massacred many different locations - that man is dead. Abdelhamid Abaaoud was killed in a dramatic raid on an apartment in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis. And because of the confusing circumstances there, it's taken until now for French...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: We have breaking news this morning of the death of the man who is believed to have planned the attacks here in Paris last Friday. He is confirmed dead by French authorities, and the city is breathing a tentative sigh of relief for now, though this might not be over. There could still be part of a terror cell in the city. His name was Abdelhamid Abaaoud. He was in the apartment that police raided...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: In Paris, has been a chaotic morning here, surreal in many ways. We are sitting in our makeshift studios here overlooking a boulevard in the central part of Paris, where life seems pretty normal. Not so just north of this city in a suburb called Saint-Denis, where there was a police raid early this morning. The police were searching for the man they believe planned the attack in Paris that killed 129...

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Residents of a northern suburb in this city woke up to the sound of gunfire and explosions. They were told to stay in their homes. Schools have been closed. This is all surrounding an apartment in the neighborhood, the community of Saint-Denis. Police surrounded an apartment before daybreak, and when they burst in, a woman blew herself up using a suicide vest. French authorities have said the operation...

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: I'm David Greene live in Paris in our makeshift studio that we've set up along Rue Saint-Lazare, a street that leads to a Metro station and commuter train station here in Paris. It has been four days now since 129 people were killed in a massacre in this city. Last night, we were at a cafe just up the boulevard here. The television above the table next to us had the banner headline, France is at war....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris on anything but a normal day. Although people are going through the motions, we have been watching the morning commute in Paris. I went by a metro station this morning. Commuters stopped to pick up a quick latte, maybe a croissant at a coffee stand near the trains. Jonathan Felipe (ph) works at that kiosk. JONATHAN FELIPE: (Speaking French). GREENE: And he was telling me there that he...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene, live in Paris where people are returning to work this morning on a Monday morning like no other. People are going to work on the street behind me, Rue Saint-Lazare, heading to the metro station; it's near a commuter train station - all this after the unimaginable violence Friday night. This morning, I met a 15-year-old girl outside the train station, her name is Louise Adam(ph) and she was...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And I'm David Greene in Paris. We're in a studio overlooking a major Boulevard in the city leading to one of the major commuter train stations in Paris. Now, we should say news this morning, French police made raids last night here in Paris and across much of the country as they searched for suspects linked to Friday's attacks in Paris that killed 129 people. This is a city in mourning and also clearly in fear....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Good morning. I'm David Greene with an update on a military surveillance blimp that broke loose over Maryland and Pennsylvania this week, ripping power lines and generally causing chaos. The blimp is part of the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System. Wow. You can just call that JLENS. It's a high-tech program, but AP is reporting state troopers had a low-tech solution to...

Fans involved in the baseball playoff series between the Toronto Blue Jays and Kansas City Royals seemed under control — until the gauntlet was thrown by the Kansas City Public Library. The library posted a photo on Twitter of three books stacked so that when you read down the stack, it left a message: But then, the Toronto Public Library responded and the conversation continued: Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Good morning, I'm David...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Now to a company that spent $7 billion on a project that has now decided to abandon it. Royal Dutch Shell announced yesterday that it is shutting down offshore oil operations in the Arctic. The energy giant was drilling some 150 miles off the coast of Barrow, Alaska, and what the company found was pretty disappointing. We reached Amy Myers Jaffe, a professor of energy and sustainability at the...

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