Eric Goold

Eric Goold moved to Paonia in 2008. His career as a journalist spans more than 15 years, mostly as a sports writer for both daily and weekly newspapers in four different states. His background in radio began at KVNF in 2012 when he became a volunteer DJ hosting the Emotional Rescue show. He did a stint as KVNF's morning news host in 2014 and came back in 2016 to host Morning Edition as well as produce and host KVNF's Regional Newscast.

Goold is proud to carry on a strong tradition of community journalism at KVNF and works hard to maintain the standard established by the volunteers and professionals who created the KVNF News department. When he has free time he likes to walk his 12 year old pitbull Isabel around town.

Eric Goold

Tuesday night's regular meeting of the Paonia Board of Trustees was disrupted when former trustee Suzanne Watson, who was trying to speak during the public comment portion of an agenda item, was ordered to leave the meeting by Mayor Charles Stewart. KVNF News has audio from the meeting and spoke with all participants.

  • Dysfunction on Paoina Town Council continues despite new board
  • Former trustee ordered out of Paonia Town Council meeting
  • More details on recent murder of Hotchkiss woman

  • Free lunch program for kids in place at 500 Colorado locations
  • Tamarisk removal programs neglect to consider plant's positive role
  • Water managers in Phoenix debate use of Colorado River water

  • Democratic nominee for Governor Jared Polis visits Delta for a town hall
  • Polis talks campaign finance reform at Delta town hall
  • Western Slope Resources Reporting about using prescribed burns to fight wildfires

  • Democratic nominee for Governor Polis talks health care, education
  • H2O Radio reports on wildfires, climate change and water supply
  • Red Mountain Pass open after rockslides forced closures yesterday

  • Governor candidate Jared Polis visits Delta, talks fracking, gun control
  • Firefighters on Weston Pass witness dramatic weather occurence last week
  • Update on wildfires around the state; weekend rain helps battle blazes
  • Paonia woman will stand trial next week for January shooting

  • Lake Christine Fire outside Basalt grows, some evacuations ordered
  • Non profit group trains next generation about stewardship in Colorado
  • BLM is proposing nearly 8,000 acres in North Fork Valley go up for lease
  • EPA boss Pruitt resigns after 16 months amid numerous ethics investigations

  • State on track for largest fire season since 2002
  • More than 12 wildfires in state have already burned over 147,000 acres
  • Connecting the Drops
  • St. Vrain River recovers after devastating floods of 2013

Ever since there were coal mines in the North Fork Valley, there has been the problem of what to do with methane byproduct that continues to pour into the atmosphere.

Meanwhile, at the Paonia Dam, another problem threatens the climate of the North Fork Valley. Years and years of mud and silt have built up against the Dam, creating a thick clay that is rapidly filling up the reservoir.

Now, an innovative scientist and the North Fork Coal Methane Working Group have come up with a possible solution to both problems.

  • BLM to allow oil and gas development on land protected for sage grouse
  • Montrose city council will move slowly in possible sales tax raise for police
  • Race for Montrose County sheriff goes down to final overseas ballot counts
  • Vehicle used to transport slain Hotchkiss woman found in Utah
  • Cost of President Trump's immigration policies impacts states

  • Democrats, Republicans hold rallies behind candidates for governor
  • Capitol Conversation disccusses high priced race for Colorado governor
  • At least 8 wildfires burning over 100,000 acres across the state

  • Shortage of foster homes creates backlog of needy children in Colorado
  • 2020 Census could leave out many Colorado children and cut funding
  • Montrose election results should be finalized this morning

  • Missing Hotchkiss woman's body found in Utah; suspect turns himself in
  • Stapleton, Polis polar opposites running for Governor
  • Montrose commissioner, sheriff races still too close to call
  • Ballot printing error in Montrose due to incorrect bar codes

Quartz

KVNF News spoke with officials from the Town of Hotchkiss, the Town of Paonia and Colorado Parks and Wildlife to get first hand information on how the drought is impacting life on the Western Slope. Also included are reports about the potential of a dry Colorado River and new farming techniques that create energy rather than use it.

  • Big spending Jared Polis wins Democratic nomination for governor
  • Outspoken Walker Stapleton wins Republican nomination for governor
  • Paonia activist wins lawsuit against him, gives interview with KDNK
  • North Fork Activist hopes his story inspires others to talk truth

  • Western Slope Resources Reporting covers EPA cleanup of Ouray mine
  • New techniques and creative thinking help cleanup of Camp Bird Mine
  • BLM to rollback sage grouse protections, taking public comment

  • Candidates for governor will be set after tomorrow's primary
  • Bears seek food due to changing climate, causing conflict with people
  • Western Slope Resources Reporting examines bear encounters
  • Three Colorado cities ranked as best in country for livability

  • Paonia activist cleared in libel case brought by energy company
  • Arizona lawmakers debate use of Colorado River water
  • Cutbacks to use of Colorado River water could impact Colorado users
  • San Juan National Forest reopened after fight with 416 Fire

  • Climate change impacting air quality in Colorado
  • Fires in southwest cause decline in air quality
  • Town of Ophir uses composting to increase sustainability
  • Western Slope Resources Reporting about a town reinventing itself

  • Governor Hickenlooper opposes immigration policies at the border
  • Western Slope Resources Reporting about Pieance Mustangs
  • Group supports BLM efforts to take care of wild horses in Northwest Colorado
  • Updates on 416 Fire, Upper Mailbox Fire in listening area

  • Reservoirs along Colorado River to remain less than half full all year
  • Cost of sexual harassment scandal at state capitol measured in more than dollars
  • Despite Pride Month in Colorado, LGBTQ teens report bullying

  • Three of four Republican candidates for governor have debate
  • Dry southwest, low snowpack, warm weather  contribute to fire danger

  • 416 Fire causes evacuation of Hermosa area, now over 4,000 acres in size
  • Love Fire in Montrose County deemed fully contained
  • Stage I fire restrictions enacted for most BLM lands in Western counties
  • Governor Hickenlooper responds to SCOTUS ruling in favor of cake maker
  • Governor vetoes nine bills in two weeks, drawing criticism
  • Climate change has big impact on Colorado River system

  • 416 Fire causing economic stress on Silverton
  • Love Fire in remote Montrose County fought by hotshot crews
  • Further reaction to SCOTUS ruling on baker's case in Lakewood

  • State capitol reaction to SCOTUS ruling in favor of Lakewood baker
  • Latest report from Western Slope Resources Reporting
  • Scientist proposes using sediment, methane to make bricks in North Fork
  • Governor Hickenlooper vetoes five bills in two days

  • Four Democrat candidates for governor debate issues
  • New study cautions countries considering fracking technology
  • 416 Fire outside of Durango disrupting lives, traffic in area

  • Hinsdale County School District wins BEST grant
  • Lake City Community School to be renovated, repaired
  • Immigrant getting sanctuary in Mancos church a national leader

  • Parks and Wildlife offers free fishing weekend on Saturday and Sunday
  • Emergency life saving devices installed on Arkansas River for rafters
  • Parks and Wildlife will hold commission meeting in Cortez
  • Feature story on reestablishing beaver presence in the West

City of Montrose

On May 14th, citizens, police officers and members of Montrose Crime Stoppers went before the City Council and asked for a ballot initiative in November that would raise sales tax revenue for public safety. A sharp increase in petty and property crime has taxed an already shorthanded Montrose Police Department. KVNF News got the details from Montrose Police Chief Tom Chinn and Montrose Crime Stoppers head John W. Nelson.

  • Local farmers get boost in spending from legislature
  • H2O Radio reports on trees and how they live
  • Colorado juvenile justice system undergoes outside review

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