Jeff Reynolds

Operations Manager

Email:  jeff(at)

Colorado Department of Transportation crews were able to clear the 100-ton rockfall Friday afternoon. CO-133 is now open once again. Cleanup & permanent repair  work will continue in coming days.

Miss your favorite music show on KVNF? No worries - now you can stream it on demand, for up to two weeks after the original air date!

The nineteenth-century English poet John Keats famously described autumn as the “season of mists and mellow fruitfulness / close bosom-friend of the maturing sun”-- a welcomed time of harvest beneath golden afternoon light. Autumn customarily heralds the appearance of falling leaves, ripe pumpkins, and wool sweaters. But also, it occasions an elusive apparition in the nighttime sky, a celestial ghost showing up for Halloween— the Gegenschein.

Steve Allen

A large rockslide at mile marker 29.5 has close Highway 133 between Paonia and McClure Pass. CDOT has not estimated how long it will take to reopen the road.  More info at

UPDATE: Closure will be "long-term," per CDOT.

Dolores Minette copyright 2016 deviantART

Pledge Drive Show!

First frost in the North Fork! Harvest is in full swing & garden cleanup is next. Anthony calls with a suggestion to "recycle" your grass, rather than raking/burning/etc.  David calls with an offer of free wood chips, and Bud calls from Rogers Mesa, wondering when he should harvest his butternut squash crop.

Joyce Tanihara

At Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, we are lucky to have dedicated local astronomers, powerful telescopes, and pristinely dark skies.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESO/R. Hurt

Now is a great time to gaze into our dark skies and to contemplate the Milky Way, our home galaxy.   After twilight ends on late September evenings, the luminous band of the Milky Way stretches from the southwest to overhead and beyond, into the northeastern sky.   To the southwest in the direction of Sagittarius, the Milky Way’s clouds of stars and glowing gas are brightest.  This is the direction of the galactic center, where stars are most concentrated.   As we trace the Milky Way from overhead in Cygnus and into Perseus in the no

Soil Scientist Ron Godin of CSU Extension is our guest tonight, with gardening guru Lance Swigart & host Jill Spears. (Lulu has "gone to the dogs" - she's away at the National Sheep Dog Trials in Carbondale. We do get a call from her during the show...)

September 8th marked the beginning of NASA’s launch window for OSIRIS-Rex, a mission to study an asteroid called Bennu and return a sample of the asteroid’s surface material to Earth for further analysis. This mission is particularly exciting because it will not only give us a peek back in time towards the beginnings of our planet and our solar system as a whole, but also might provide clues as to how life began here on Earth. (Ed.

Jeff Reynolds

Gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen and KVNF host Jill Spears ruminate on late summer/early fall gardening matters, while masticating the fruits of their labors...

Lance also brought in a curiosity - a fruit from an Osage orange tree that he has growing at his place.  These are common as hedgerows in plains states, and their wood was prized by Native Americans for  making bows.

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen nibble on Lance's delicious Reliance seedless grapes while discussing the state of late-summer gardening & harvesting. Anthony calls with a question about how to transplant some 100-year-old raspberry plants.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Exciting research in the field of astronomy has been the search for exoplanets. An exoplanet is a planet that is orbiting a star other than our Sun.

What's Up On Redlands Mesa? Farm, Garden & Artists' Studio Tour

Jill, Lance & Lulu get started with a sample of corn smut from Lance's garden. (Corn smut is an edible fungus that infects corn. It's considered a delicacy in Mexico.)

Jill, Lance & Lulu chat about summer harvest & more! Skip has a question about why fruit trees bear so much fruit that they break. John wants to know when to plant new plum trees & where to get them. Hope calls in with an apricot tree question.

Public Domain (CC0)

A clear evening in late August offers much to contemplate, both near, relatively speaking astronomically, and far.

Public Domain (CC0)

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart discuss summer gardening tips, sample some wild plums, and entertain the burning question "Why isn't composting an Olympic sport?"

Lightning has apparently once again zapped our receiving equipment on Round Top, interrupting the KVNF signal into Lake City. We are awaiting delivery of replacement parts, and will get the 88.7 translator back on the air just as quickly as possible. In the meantime, you can stream KVNF here. Thanks for your patience.

By Sage Ross (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 ( or GFDL (], via Wikimedia Commons

Host Jill Spears visits with gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen about mid-season garden cleanup & other topics. Amber calls to ask what might be eating her hops, leaving "skeletonized" leaves. Lulu's neighbor Ben calls with a seed-saving question.

Today, I thought you might like to hear how any young person can get started on a career path to astronomy.

Host Jill Spears & gardeners Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart discuss summer gardening & take listener calls.

Jeff Reynolds

KVNF's Lake City translator is down for repairs. We apologize for the inconvenience. Lake City listeners can still tune us in online at

We hope to have everything back up & running in a few days.

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lulu Volckhausen & Lance Swigart discuss the latest happenings in their gardens.


One year ago, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft made its historic flyby of Pluto.

CCO Public Domain

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen discuss the latest news from their gardens. A whole lotta plantin' still going on.

Something took out Lulu's squash plants - a mystery!

Volunteer plants popping up here & there - tomatoes, squash, etc.


Chelsea Bookout

Host Jill Spears & gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen dig deep into summer garden tips. Georgia calls with a question about fire blight. Toni wonders what to do with wild sumac berries. Lance has a trick question about mulberries.

Joyce Tanihara

It’s a dark area broken by the faint glow of red lights, and your eyes are just adjusting to make out a figure, hunched over what vaguely looks to be a telescope.

“Hey, I’ve got Saturn!” exclaims the figure. “I’ve got a double star,” shouts another voice. “I’ve got the Andromeda galaxy. Come take a look!” says someone toward the back.

Chelsea Bookout

Summer is here & the gardening crew is deep in the thick of it. Jill, Lulu & Lance are joined this week by special guest Ron Godin, Soil Scientist from CSU Extension. He discusses treating peach trees for gummosis, a fungal disease, and using specific cover crops to help control pests such as soil nematodes.  Did you know that winter rye can actually crowd out bindweed?

Spring turns into summer - a solstice edition of the show! Jill, Lance & Lulu discuss the latest news from the gardens, and take calls.

If you look to the east after sunset, you will notice a bright, reddish-orange object.  This is the planet Mars, 4th rock from the Sun.  Less than one month ago, Mars was at opposition.  This means that it is directly opposite from the Sun, as we view it.  This also means that it is very bright, because it is reflecting light directly back to us.  Opposition is the planetary equivalent of a full moon. 

The diameter of Mars is about 4200 miles, compared to Earth’s diameter of about 8,000 miles and its mass is just 11% of Earth’s.  On May 30, Mars was 47 million miles from Earth.