Jeff Reynolds

Operations Manager

Email:  jeff(at)kvnf.org

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardeners Lance Swigart and Lulu Volckhausen discuss end-of-season garden issues and take listeners' calls.

Host Jill Spears is in the studio with gardening experts Lulu Volckhausen and Lance Swigart, chatting about garden chores & taking calls from listeners. Also, "Lance's Pet Peeve," (possible new feature?) This week - Put drains on your sprinkler systems so they don't need to be "blown out" every year. 

In the summer of 1977, NASA launched the Voyager 1 and 2 space probes.  Their original 5-year mission was to study Jupiter and Saturn.  Voyager 2 was actually launched 2 weeks before Voyager 1, but arrived at Jupiter after Voyager 1. Both probes are still functioning today after more than 40 years.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardening gurus Lance Swigart and Lulu Volckhausen talk about fall gardening chores, post-frost cleanup and other topics.

Guest host Amber Kleinman is in the studio with regulars Lulu Volckhausen and Lance Swigart. The first bit of frost has hit many gardens - what's the best way to deal with it?

Callers:
Jane has grown brussel sprouts and wants ideas for how to cook them.
Marty has potted her tomato plants and wonders how much water they will need to survive inside.

Garlic!

Peering upward on late September evenings, the sky is dominated by the Milky Way, which arches from the southwest to the northeast.  High overhead, we can easily view the Great Rift, an area within the Milky Way but, seemingly, almost completely devoid of stars.  In fact, this absence of stars is due to the gas and dust, common in spiral galaxies such as our own, which obscures the stars beyond.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen discuss fall gardening and take calls from listeners.

Host Jill Spears and gardeners extraordinaire Lulu Volckhausen and Lance Swigart discuss late summer gardening & harvesting tips, and take calls from listeners.

Tyler Nordgren

Consider how the night sky has influenced life on Earth. What have the darkness, the stars, and the moon helped create?

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardeners Lance Swigart and Lulu Volckhausen discuss late summer gardening and harvesting tips and take calls from listeners.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears welcomes gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen and special guest Jere Lowe of Earth Friendly Supply for a discussion of late summer gardening tips.

Trying to find the official constellations can be a challenge, but most of us saw shapes in the clouds without even trying as children. In the same way, we can see new shapes in the stars, if we simply slow down and look. In doing so, we can reconnect with all the people who for millennia passed the time after dark by simply looking up at the stars, and coming up with their own constellations. 

Host Jill Spears welcomes gardeners Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen, plus special guest Jere Lowe of Earth Friendly Supply.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

LULU'S  BACK! And Jill & Lance are here as always, discussing late summer gardening and taking your calls.

Dan from Log Hill w/a question about pumpkins.Anthony has a comment about box elder bugs, and a question about cannabis seeds. Also Woodstock...

 

The western sky darkens, air temperatures drop, birds and animals become suddenly quiet.  Almost instantly, daylight is transformed into deep twilight, as Venus and the brighter stars appear.  Incredibly, where the Sun stood sits a black disk surrounded by a pearly white halo with delicate, spiky streamers extending outward in all directions.  You’re experiencing a total solar eclipse.

Marilyn Stone

Host Jill Spears chats with gardening guru Lance Swigart, and our usual 3rd  crew member, Lulu Volckhausen, calls in from Glenwood Springs.

Calls from Darrell in Peach Valley, Duna in Norwood, Sue in Ridgway, Katie in Crawford.

Listener Marilyn Stone emailed us the picture shown here, with this question: "We have 2 nests of these bees or wasps near RxR ties that border the yard. They don't seem to be overly aggressive. I've never seen bees or wasps build this kind of nest before. Any ideas what they are? Are they beneficial?"

By NASA/JPL

October 15, 1997 – The Cassini Mission to Saturn is launched. After almost seven years en-route to Saturn, the space probe entered orbit on July 1, 2004.

Host Jill Spears and gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen chat about summer gardening & take calls.

Amber calls with a question about whiteflies.

Andrea has a question about dealing with ants in a potted cactus that she wants to be able to bring indoors this winter.

Tim calls with a question about a sickly cherry tree, and also a report that the CSU Extension Research Center on Rogers Mesa west of Hotchkiss will be reopening.

Jeff Reynolds

Eilen Jewell, with opening act Carrie Rodriguez, live from Ridgway's Hartwell Park tonight at 7 pm! Live stream here at kvnf.org, or tune in to 90.9 or 89.1.

Suze Smith

Jill, Lance & Lulu dive into mid-summer gardening tips & take calls from listeners every Tuesday, 6:30-7:00 pm.

Email your questions to worm@kvnf.org if you like, or call 866-KVNF-NOW during the program.

The summer night sky is teeming with bright stars, but one outshines them all and has stories to tell that rival its brightness. Head outside at nightfall and look almost straight overhead to spot the brightest star in the summer sky, the red giant, Arcturus.

Host Jill Spears and her garden gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen chat about their latest garden adventures and take calls from listeners.

Jen calls with a question about ants. Anthony calls with a tomato-planting question. Charris calls from Horsefly Mesa, wondering how to transplant wild lupines.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

The garden gurus share mid-summer gardening tips & take your calls on the Independence Day Edition of As the Worm Turns. Watering tips, how to transplant irises, harvesting & drying garlic.

NASA

“As one great furnace flamed, yet from those flames / No light, but rather darkness visible,” wrote English poet John Milton in Paradise Lost, describing the infernal realm into which the archangel Lucifer fell. Milton’s words could equally describe a more astronomical sort of descent-- the whirling dervish and collision of orbiting black holes, warping the very fabric of space and time around them. Such events are detectable from Earth in the form of gravitational radiation, a phenomenon offering a novel way of seeing the Universe.

Jill, Lance & Lulu discuss the best ways to beat the heat in the garden! "Lots of water" is the answer for many issues with our current dry spell.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

As we celebrate the Summer Solstice, (10:24 pm MDT Tuesday 6/20/17,) host Jill Spears and her gardening experts Lulu Volckhausen and Lance Swigart discuss tips for summer gardening, including dealing with the current heat wave.

Garlic is ready for harvest. Time to plant fall cabbage crop.

Dave calls from Delta to ask "Are carrot tops edible?" Answer: Yes they are.

What value can be found in a truly dark, star-speckled sky? Simply put, there is no universal answer.

Host Jill Spears and her gardening gurus Lance Swigart & Lulu Volckhausen discuss summer gardening tips and take calls from listeners.

Jefferson in Paonia has an issue with the crew's potato advice.
Margit in Paonia has a question about compost.
Dave, who helps with Northside Elementary School garden in Montrose, has a couple of questions.
Scott from Moab calls in, with issues similar to Dave's - yellowing leaves.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Jill, Lance & Lulu wax eloquent about all things garden-related. Rich & Joy call in with a question about something eating their newly-sprouted beans. Josephine has a question about box elder bugs.

My husband is an amateur astronomer and we are fortunate to have great dark skies at home and at other Western Slope venues.

Most people assume that we use telescopes for observing and ask how many we have and what kind. We explain that we have several telescopes, but some of our favorite viewing is with binoculars.

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