Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Shoko Asahara, the leader of the Japanese doomsday cult that carried out a deadly 1995 sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway system, was executed by hanging Friday along with six of his followers.

Asahara, the visually impaired, heavyset self-styled guru of Aum Shinrikyo, was sentenced to death in 2004 in part for directing Japan's deadliest terrorist attack — a complex plot that came to fruition on March 20, 1995 when cult members boarded five separate trains during morning rush hour and released the nerve agent, killing 13 commuters and sickening some 6,000 others.

A former IT specialist for congressional Democrats who has figured prominently in right-wing conspiracy theories pleaded guilty Tuesday to making false statements on a loan application. Nevertheless, federal prosecutors said they found no evidence that he stole government secrets, as many conservatives, including President Trump, have suggested.

A 3-year-old girl who was among nine people injured during a stabbing attack at her birthday party has died from her wounds.

Six of the victims were children, and three were adults. Of the children, one is the 3-year-old girl who died and there are two 4-year-olds, a 6-year-old, an 8-year-old and a 12-year-old.

One other child was released from the hospital, but seven other victims of the stabbing on Saturday are still being treated for their injuries, according to the Idaho Statesman.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. ET

President Trump has ordered U.S. flags to be lowered to half-staff as "a mark of solemn respect" for the four journalists and a newspaper sales representative killed last week at the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Md. The proclamation came after Annapolis' mayor said his request to lower flags had been denied.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

A dozen boys and their soccer coach were found alive inside a flooded cave in Thailand on Monday, nine days after they went missing.

A British diver participating in the international rescue mission appears on a video to be one of the first two divers to have reached the boys, who all seemed responsive and happy to be found.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is celebrating the company having reached its goal of producing 5,000 Model 3 electric cars a week by the end of June.

"We did it!" Musk wrote in an email to the company, as reported on the website Electrek, which follows Tesla closely. "What an incredible job by an amazing team."

Updated at 6:30 a.m. ET

Germany's interior minister has offered his resignation to Chancellor Angela Merkel over the government's policy on accepting migrants.

Horst Seehofer, a member of the conservative Bavarian Christian Social Union, has not only offered to resign from Merkel's Cabinet, but also from the leadership of the CSU.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET

Leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador — who campaigned partly on a platform of standing up to President Trump — will become Mexico's next president after easily outpacing his two main rivals.

With about a third of the votes counted, López Obrador was polling about 53 percent to 24 percent for conservative candidate Ricardo Anaya and 15 percent for Jose Antonio Meade of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary (PRI) party.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

The man suspected of fatally shooting five people and wounding two others at the newsroom of the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Md., had filed a lawsuit over the coverage by one of its publications, The Capital newspaper, of a criminal harassment charge against him.

Gerald Fischman, 61, editorial page editor

Fischman was an award winning writer and editor in the Capital Gazette newsroom who had worked there for more than a quarter century. The Baltimore Sun, owner of the Annapolis-based Capital Gazette, which publishes The Capital and other newspapers, says colleagues noted Fischman's quiet personality, which masked a keen mind that produced editorials ranging from state politics to arts reviews.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders will reportedly receive temporary Secret Service protection days after she was asked to leave a Virginia restaurant.

NBC first reported that Sanders would receive the high-level protection, which is ordinarily reserved for the president, vice president and their families. CNN subsequently quoted sources it said corroborated the report. NPR was not immediately able to independently confirm the reports.

A federal judge in San Diego has barred the separation of migrant children and ordered that those currently detained under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy be reunited with families within 30 days.

In a stunning primary upset, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — a young socialist activist, woman of color and political newcomer — has unseated leading House Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley in New York's deep-blue 14th Congressional District.

Updated at 8:42 p.m. ET

Guatemala's opposition is accusing the head of the country's emergency response agency of failing to heed warnings ahead of the eruption of a volcano that has left 109 dead and almost 200 others missing.

The finger-pointing came as rain showers and the fear of mudslides hindered the search for possible survivors and the recovery of the dead from Sunday's eruption of Fuego (Spanish for fire). It is one of Central America's most active volcanoes.

Chinese cellphone maker ZTE Corp. — the target of U.S. sanctions before President Trump ordered an abrupt about-face last month — has reportedly agreed to a preliminary deal to lift a U.S. Commerce Department ban on it buying from American suppliers.

The commander of the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Okinawa, Japan, has been relieved from his post over a "loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead his command," an official statement said without elaborating.

Col. Mark Coppess was fired on Tuesday by Marine Corps Installations Pacific chief Brig. Gen. Paul Rock, according to a III Marine Expeditionary Force statement quoted by Stars and Stripes.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

The death toll from Guatemala's Fuego volcano rose to at least 99 on Wednesday, with many people still missing, after two strong explosions that scattered ash over a wide area and displaced thousands of residents from their homes.

The scenes of devastation were accompanied by heartbreaking stories of entire families devastated by the disaster — the biggest eruption from the mountain in four decades.

A former Defense Intelligence Agency officer has been charged with attempted espionage for allegedly selling secrets to China.

Ron Rockwell Hansen, a 58-year-old Utah resident, was seized on Saturday on his way to the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, where prosecutors say he meant to board a China-bound flight.

According to The Associated Press, a 41-page felony complaint details how Hansen was paid as much as $800,000 over a period of years to provide technology and secrets to Beijing.

The Justice Department is appealing a ruling made last month that President Trump cannot block followers to his Twitter account based on their political views, according to a court filing.

In the past, the president has blocked critics from his @realDonaldTrump account, ranging from novelist Stephen King, comedian Rosie O'Donnell and Philip Cohen, a professor of sociology at the University of Maryland and one of seven plaintiffs in the case.

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered a new hearing at which she is expected to consider accusations by prosecutors that former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort tampered with witnesses in his case.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Manafort, prosecutors, witnesses and others to be prepared to appear and to testify on June 15, according to the new order.

Prosecutors have asked Berman Jackson to rescind Manafort's bail and order him to jail ahead of his trial, which is scheduled for this autumn.

Australia's largest bank has been hit by a record $531 million fine for delays in reporting tens of thousands of transactions – a breach of the country's anti-money laundering and counterterrorism regulations.

The Commonwealth Bank of Australia, or CBA, admitted that it had been late in reporting 53,000 transactions in excess of AU$10,000 over a three-year period from 2012 to 2015. The settlement, which amounts to AU$700 million, is the largest civil penalty in Australia's corporate history.

Updated 10:18 a.m. ET

President Trump has the "absolute" power to pardon himself, he argued on Monday morning, then asked rhetorically why he would use it because he hasn't done anything wrong.

Spainish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has been forced out by a no-confidence vote led by the country's opposition Socialist party.

The motion passed by a narrow margin in the 350-seat lower house of Spain's parliament after the Socialists were able to corral enough votes from other parties. The final vote was 180 in favor, 169 against and one abstention, El País reports.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET

Italy's anti-establishment 5-Star Movement and the right-wing League have persuaded the country's president to allow them to form a new government – a populist coalition that is already making waves with the European Union.

The coalition will be headed by Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, an untested political figure.

"Koinonia," a Greek word meaning Christian fellowship or communion that appears a number of times in the Bible, put 14-year-old Karthik Nemmani of McKinney, Texas, over the top at the 2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday night.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says his government "cannot accept" new U.S. tariffs on imported automobiles, as is reportedly being considered as a possible next move by the White House.

President Trump last week launched an investigation into whether auto imports posed a national security risk to the U.S., a justification that might be used to raise the duty on cars from 2.5 percent up to 25 percent.

The board of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary has voted to fire its longtime president, Paige Patterson, who was ousted from the top post last week amid controversy over past counsel he had given women concerning marital abuse and rape.

The Fort Worth-based seminary's board voted a week ago to replace Patterson as president, appointing him instead "president emeritus with compensation."

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is meeting with a top North Korean official for the second day on Thursday, resuming talks that began over dinner in New York as the two seek to salvage a June 12 summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un.

The summit, planned since April, was called off just a week ago by Trump amid a renewed round of heated rhetoric from Pyongyang and concerns over whether North Korea was sincere about "denuclearization." Within days of canceling the summit, however, there was talk of getting it back on track.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

Alberto is pushing deeper inland after making landfall in the Florida Panhandle on Memorial Day, causing flash flooding, mudslides, downed trees and power outages through parts of the South, East and central U.S. and prompting officials to warn of a possible dam failure in North Carolina.

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