Morning Edition

Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne & David Greene

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a7a8e1c86a2e61ba3cde|5182a7a3e1c86a2e61ba3cd1

Pages

Around the Nation
4:24 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Cubs Fan Continues Wait For World Series Win

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This next news story has been a tradition since roughly 1908. It's the story of a Chicago Cubs fan waiting to win the World Series. The News-Sun says Doris Davis has been a fan since 1926. In the days before TV, she listened on the radio while moving players around a diamond she made from a checkerboard. And she's still waiting for that championship. As the season nears its end, the Cubs are 22 games out of first.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

2 Democratic Senators Propose Alternate Plan For Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

President Obama on Tuesday meets with Democratic senators to press his case for military action against Syria. Two moderate senators are offering an alternative plan. It would delay military action for 45 days, and give Bashar Assad another chance to get rid of his chemical weapons. Steve Inskeep talks to Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota about the plan.

Politics
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Tea Party Won't Let Congress Forget Obamacare Issues

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Congress did not expect to spend September debating Syria. Many Republicans, instead, were planning battles over the budget and over the healthcare law that's about to take affect. Tea Party activists are going ahead with meetings on their issues. One event comes in Washington D.C. today. NPR's Don Gonyea has been talking with activists.

Read more
Asia
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

India Court Convicts 4 Men In Fatal Gang Rape

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A judge in New Delhi has just delivered his guilty verdict for four men who raped and murdered a young woman on a city bus back in December. It was one of the most high profile cases in Indian history. The horrific crime stirred a national debate over the country's lax prosecution of crimes against women and became an international issue as well. We talk to NPR's Julie McCarthy who was at the courthouse. Good morning.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

Read more
Politics
1:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Colorado Voters To Decide 2 Lawmakers' Fates In Recall Elections

State Sens. Angela Giron and John Morse, both Democrats, face recall elections Tuesday. The battle in Colorado has attracted major players from across the nation, reflecting the sustained intensity over the issue of gun rights.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 12:01 pm

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:05 am
Tue September 10, 2013

During Katrina, 'Memorial' Doctors Chose Who Lived, Who Died

Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2005.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

On Aug. 30, 2005, a doctor climbed the stairs through a New Orleans hospital to the helipad, which was rarely used, and so old and rusted it wasn't even painted with the hospital's current name.

From that helipad over Memorial Medical Center, the doctor looked out over New Orleans, now flooding after Hurricane Katrina. He considered the more than 2,000 people in the hospital below — 244 of them patients.

Read more
Code Switch
1:04 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Congress Honors Victims Of Infamous Alabama Church Bombing

One man was convicted in the bombing in 1977, but more than two decades would pass before any other suspects were tried for murder.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 8:32 am

On Tuesday, Congress will bestow its highest civilian honor — posthumously — on the young victims of a deadly Alabama church bombing from the civil rights era.

The Congressional Gold Medals for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley come 50 years after the black girls were killed by a Ku Klux Klan bomb.

Just as the federal recognition is long in coming, so was justice.

Read more
History
1:04 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Remembering A 'Brave,' 'Lucky' Hero In The War Of 1812

The U.S. Brig Niagara is a replica of the ship Oliver Hazard Perry sailed to victory. The Niagara carries four carronades, or short-range cannons. The original ship was outfitted with 18 carronades that could shoot a 32-pound ball about half a mile.
Ryan Whaley Green Door Mediawork

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Two hundred years ago today, a young U.S. naval captain named Oliver Hazard Perry penned the words, "We have met the enemy and they are ours ..."

Perry's remarkable victory over the British changed the course of the War of 1812, and a full-scale re-enactment — the largest sailing re-enactment ever attempted in the U.S. — recently commemorated the anniversary of the win in the Battle of Lake Erie.

A Bit Of History

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Humanitarian Aid Agencies Brace For Fallout From Syrian Strikes

At the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, many families struggle to get clean water, food and health services.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:04 am

The World Health Organization says the Syrian civil war is currently the worst ongoing humanitarian crisis on earth.

Aid groups have been scrambling to provide shelter, food, water and health care to the huge numbers of people who've been uprooted by the fighting. The big question now is whether U.S. military action could spark another wave of refugees and make the situation worse.

Read more
Europe
5:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Tourists Flock To Downton, England

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Pages