Black Canyon Astronomical Society

Western Slope Skies
8:15 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Western Slope Skies 9/13/13

The sun rises in the east each day in our western slope skies and appears to shine with constant brightness. However, we shouldn’t take the sun for granted, because the sun’s energy sustains most life on Earth.  And, in this age of widespread, complex technology, the sun can impact our daily lives. 

The sun, in fact, is not constant, and we need to pay attention to our active, local star.  

Read more
Western Slope Skies
10:05 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Western Slope Skies 8/30/13

Just about any clear night provides an invitation to go outside and see what’s up. Some nights, however, might offer a special attraction: a meteor shower; a conjunction between the Moon and a bright star or planet; or even a lunar eclipse. If you are a beginner stargazer you can maximize your sky watching efforts by taking a few simple steps.

Start with a star chart, and/or a Planisphere or a star-charting app that runs on a smart phone, tablet, or PC.  These are valuable tools in learning the night sky, displaying any number of sky objects for any hour of the night.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
10:16 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Western Slope Skies 8/16/13

As August began, all of the bright planets were visible in our western slope skies. Since all of our solar system planets orbit the sun, the visible planets change from night to night. 

As of today’s program, we have already lost Mercury from view for the rest of this month. It was visible in the early dawn for the first two weeks of the month. However, we still have Venus shining low on the evening horizon. Saturn will end the month just a little higher than Venus. Jupiter rises well after midnight, followed by Mars even later.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
9:08 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Western Slope Skies 8/2/2013

The Perseid meteor shower sprinkles the night sky with shooting stars in August.

The meteors are bits of icy and rocky debris left behind by the Comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862. As Earth flies through the comet’s path, some bits of comet dust slam into the atmosphere at tens of thousands of miles per hour. They quickly vaporize, creating bright but brief streaks of light in the night sky.

Read more
NEWS
8:26 am
Fri August 2, 2013

KVNF Local Newscast Friday, August 2, 2013

  • Allegiant Air Again Offering Flights from Arizona and California to Montrose This Winter
  • 200 Million Gallons of Contaminated Groundwater Removed During Uranium Mill-Tailings Cleanup
  • Western Slope Skies – Meteor Showers in August
  • Billion-Dollar Tax Increase for Education Likely to Appear on Ballot
  • Controversial Grading System for Colorado Teachers Begins This Fall
  • Delta County November Ballot Likely to Include More Questions than Usual
  • Report: Illegal Exports of
Read more
Western Slope Skies
8:53 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Western Slope Skies 7/19/13

This is the second in a series on Women in Astronomy. 

In the early 1900s, Henrietta Swan Leavitt discovered a characteristic of certain variable stars that is still used today to measure astronomical distance. 

Read more
Western Slope Skies
1:22 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Western Slope Skies 7/5/2013

While there are always objects of interest to see in the night sky throughout the year, the summer sky is unique in that it offers us a view into the very center of the Milky Way, our home galaxy.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
8:15 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Western Slope Skies 6/21/13

This is the first in a series of Western Slope Skies episodes about Women in Astronomy.  We hope that, in some manner, these inspire our young female listeners to become involved in astronomy.

On June 16, 1963, the Russians launched Vostok 6.  The lone astronaut on board was Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space.  She was in space for 48 orbits over three days.  In her single mission, she logged more time in space than all the American astronauts who had been in space to that date combined.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
8:00 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Western Slope Skies 6/7/2013

Have you ever attended a night sky session and heard people talk about Messier 13 or Messier 6?  Today we discuss the man whose list is a legacy that still excites astronomers over 200 years later. 

Charles Messier was born in France on June 26, 1730.  He became interested in astronomy at a young age.  In 1751, the French Navy hired Messier as an assistant astronomer in Paris. 

Read more
Western Slope Skies
5:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Western Slope Skies 5/10/2013

“Hey, can you see the flag in that thing?!”  It’s a question that makes us wince when observing the moon at astronomy outreaches.  The answer is…Maybe if you were aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter… but, all six of the flags are now faded to white, and the first one blew over when the Apollo 11 lunar module blasted off departing the moon.  

From our backyards, the moon, our closest celestial neighbor, is easily observed by the unaided eye  as it moves through its changing phases.  During the next two weeks, the moon will move from new to nearly full.

 

Read more
Western Slope Skies
9:38 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Western Slope Skies 4/26/2013

Saturn…The ringed planet. The sixth planet from the Sun; second largest in the Solar System behind Jupiter; and the one that evokes the most vivid images in our thoughts. It is an unforgettable sight, even in a small telescope.  

From now until early May, Saturn will be the brightest it has been for more than 5 years. It rises in the east as the Sun sets and will be visible all night long.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
10:32 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Western Slope Skies 4/12/2013

Listen to Western Slope Skies, a report on the night sky by the Black Canyon Astronomical Society.  

Read more
ENVIRONMENT
2:12 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Western Slope Skies 3/15/2013

Listen to Western Slope Skies, an astronomical report created by the Black Canyon Astronomical Society.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
8:00 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Comet Pan-STARRS

This could be a spectacular year for comets, ending with one that may be the brightest comet in many years appearing in the last 2-3 months of the year. 


Read more
Western Slope Skies
8:00 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Light Pollution

The term Light Pollution refers to excessive and glaring artificial lighting, especially light that is scattered above the horizon.  This is a very serious problem for astronomers, because it can prevent them from seeing objects in space.

Read more
Western Slope Skies
11:56 am
Wed December 19, 2012

Winter Solstice

December 21st marks the year’s longest night and shortest day, with daylight lasting only 9 hours and 20 minutes on the Western Slope.  This is our winter solstice, the first official day of winter.


Read more

Pages