Homeless

flu shot, vaccine
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District

The state reports more than 2,600 people have been hospitalized because of the flu so far this season. And, St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction has seen its share of those cases. 

Gretchen Gore, with the hospital, says after patients are discharged it’s recommend they rest at home, but that’s not an option for everyone. 

"It was discovered that when we have someone that is homeless they don’t have a warm home to go home to and recover," Gore says.  

For five years, the Abraham Connection, a homeless shelter in Delta, has been providing overnight stays from November until May.

If you don't have a place to live, getting enough to eat clearly may be a struggle. And since homelessness in the U.S. isn't going away and is even rising in some cities, more charitable groups and individuals have been stepping up the past few years to share food with these vulnerable folks in their communities.

But just as more people reach out to help, cities are biting back at those hands feeding the homeless.

Every summer for 27 years, a small tent city has popped up in San Diego. "Stand Down" is a three-day oasis for homeless veterans, with showers, new clothes, hot meals, medical help, legal aid and a booth set up for every housing program in the city.

Increasingly, the event needs ways to keep children entertained.

"They've got the kids zone and everything. My kids live out here very happy. They're looking forward to it from last year," says Alex Morales, who served in the Army in the 1970s.

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