Population Growth

According to state and federal census figures, Colorado's population is expected to grow by an additional 2.3 million people by 2040. That's going to significantly impact the way we live – from traffic congestion, to water, to quality of life.

Most noticeably will be a shift to an older population.

Paonia, North Fork Valley
Steve Huntley

It’s estimated 7.8 million people will live in Colorado by the year 2040. A Rocky Mountain PBS I-News analysis of data from the state demographer and the U.S. Census Bureau shows, seven of the 10 fastest growing counties will be on the Western Slope, including Garfield and Montrose. 

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  • Water conservation pays off for Lake City
  • Women’s health expected to big issue in upcoming legislative session
  • Regional cold snap here to stay

  • Roadwork on Highway 92 near Hotchkiss delayed until spring
  • Police recover guns stolen from Grand Junction museum
  • Census Bureau: North Dakota, Colorado fastest growing populations
  • A conversation with outgoing Colorado natural resource director Mike King

"Colorful Colorado" may one day need to be referred to as "Crowded Colorado," given the number of people expected to soon move here.

Weld County's population is expected to double to half-a-million – and El Paso County will still be the largest county. It's not just the Front Range; A Rocky Mountain PBS I-News analysis of data from the state demographer and the U.S. Census Bureau shows seven of the 10 fastest growing counties will be on the Western Slope, including Eagle, Garfield and Routt.

The numbers show an estimated 7.8 million people will call Colorado home by 2040. All that growth will take a toll on the state's infrastructure as well as water and other natural resources.

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  • Colorado looking towards population boom in coming years

Headlines

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  • Water Conflicts Escalating between Agriculture and Growing Colorado Cities
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  • Colorado Oil and Gas Association Donates Over $604,000 to Pro-Fracking Campaigns
  • KVNF Sports Report

Connecting the Drops: "Buy and Dry"

Oct 18, 2013
Maeve Conran

Water has always been a source of conflict in the arid West, but in recent years the conflict between agriculture and growing cities has escalated as both entities compete for this limited resource.