western colorado

Doug Tucker

The first batch of Colorado's recreational marijuana stores opened this month on New Years Day in Telluride, Breckenridge and Denver among other places, marking the beginning of what's expected to be a multi-million dollar industry.


The first recreational marijuana shop west of Breckenridge along I-70 is now open for business in Carbondale.

KDNK's Ed Williams reports that long lines and high taxes are not deterring a steady stream of customers at the shop, called the Doctor's Garden.

Travis Bubenik/KVNF

KVNF recently spoke in Ridgway with Susan Long, manager for the Ouray County Fairgrounds as well as the 4-H Events Center for the past eight years. 

Ms. Long and I spent an afternoon touring the rodeo grounds and talking about the association's plans to renovate the fairgrounds' historic WWII-era grandstands, as well as the aging announcer's booth and bucking shoots. 

Long says the planned renovations are aimed at increasing safety and bringing more outdoor to the grounds, all while preserving the unique western heritage of the region.

Anda Rojs Smalls

Unlike other Western states, Colorado’s moose population is growing. It’s healthier than ever with an estimated 2300 moose across the state. While other states are grappling with why their herds are shrinking, Colorado is studying the population’s fast growth. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Anda Rojs Smalls has lived in the Aspen area for over a decade. But, it was just recently that she saw a moose.

"My first moose sighting was about two years ago, in the summertime, with my kids up at the Maroon Lake," she says.

Patty Kaech-Feder

Though we’re barely a week into August, some signs of fall have started to appear in western Colorado.


  • April showers: an aberration, not a trend
  • Sounds of the High Country: Idaho’s political polarization
  • Number of children needing fostering and adoption soars
  • Ozone violations in Western Colorado for the first time
  • Parachute Leak Update
  • Growing A Local Beer, Farm To Glass

Andrew Cranson

Last week, the Delta County Health department reported three additional cases of West Nile Virus among residents. That brings the total number of confirmed and suspect human cases of the virus in the county to 20–most of which have resulted in uncomplicated fever. Most of the reported cases have been in the Delta and North Fork areas, and on Saturday, the town of Hotchkiss sprayed to kill adult mosquitoes. For KVNF and the iSeeChange project, Julia Kumari Drapkin takes a closer look at why mosquitoes and West Nile Virus are thriving in a DROUGHT year and whether community efforts to spray late in the season will pay off.

Produced by Julia Kumari Drapkin, the iSeeChange project at KVNF is part of Localore, a nationwide production of AIR designed to accelerate transformation and extend public service media to all Americans.   KVNF was selected as one of  only 10 Localore stations across the country—learn more at airmediaworks.org. Localore is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Wyncote Foundation, the John T. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Interactive storytelling partner Zeega co-produced TheAlmanac.org with iSeeChange.